Today in History: September 14 | HistoryNet MENU

Today in History: September 14

What Happened This Day In History.

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.


September 14
1146   Zangi of the Near East is murdered. The Sultan Nur ad-Din, his son, pursues the conquest of Edessa.
1321   Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after finishing writing Paradiso.
1544   Henry VIII‘s forces take Boulogne, France.
1773   Russian forces under Aleksandr Suvorov successfully storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey.
1791   Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French constitution.
1812   Napoleon Bonaparte‘s invasion of Russia reaches its climax as his Grande Armee enters Moscow–only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained.
1814   Francis Scott Key writes the words to the “Star Spangled Banner” as he waits aboard a British launch in Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
1847   U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually bringing the two-year Mexican War to a close.
1853   The Allies land at Eupatoria on the west coast of Crimea.
1862   At the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap, Maryland Union troops smash into the Confederates as they close in on what will become the Antietam battleground.
1901   Vice President Theodore Roosevelt is sworn in as the 26th President of the United States upon the death of William McKinley, who was shot eight days earlier.
1911   Russian Premier Pyotr Stolypin is mortally wounded in an assassination attempt at the Kiev opera house.
1943   German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy..
1960   Iraq, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia form OPEC.
1966   Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops, becomes a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
1975   Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
1979   Nur Muhammad Taraki, president and former prime minister of Afghanistan, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power.
1982   Bachir Gemayel, president-elect of Lebanon, is killed along with 26 others in a bomb blast in Beirut.
1984   Joe Kittinger, a former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
Born on September 14
1769   Baron Friedrich von Humboldt, German naturalist and explorer who made the first isothermic and isobaric maps.
1849   Ivan Pavlov, Russian physiologist who studied dogs’ responsiveness.
1860   Hamlin Garland, author who wrote about the Midwest in novels such as A Son of the Middle Border and The Book of the American Indian.
1864   Lord Robert Cecil, one of the founders of the League of Nations and its president from 1923 to 1945.
1867   Charles Dana Gibson, illustrator, creator of the ‘Gibson Girl.’
1879   Margaret Sanger, birth-control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood.
1898   Hal B. Wallis, film producer (The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca).
1921   Constance Baker Motley, the first African-American woman to be appointed a federal judge.
1930   Allan Bloom, writer (The Closing of the American Mind).
1934   Kate Millet, feminist writer, author of Sexual Politics.
1936   Ferid Murad, Albanian-American physician and pharmacologist, a co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on nitroglycerin’s effects on the cardiovascular system.
1948   Marc Reisner, author and environmentalist best known for his book Cadillac Desert, a history of water management in the Western portion of the US.
1955   Geraldine Brooks, Australian-American journalist and author; her novel March won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005).
1961   Wendy Thomas (Melinda “Wendy” Thomas Morse), namesake, mascot and spokesperson for the Wendy’s chain of fast-food restaurants.
1983   Amy Winehouse, singer-songwriter; her five Grammy wins (out of six nominations) for her Back to Black album (2006) tied the existing record for most wins by a female artist in a single night; won the Brit Award for Best British Female Artist (2007).