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  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Harshaw to Lochiel, Arizona

    In 1539 Franciscan friar Marcos de Niza set out to explore the region north of Sonora, Mexico, fabled to contain untold riches. Fray Marcos found no gold, but he is credited with being the first European to set foot on U.S. soil west of...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Shakespeare, New Mexico

    A spring in an arroyo near New Mexico’s Pyramid Mountains brought Apaches, Mexicans and Americans to what would become Shakespeare. Dubbed Mexican Spring by whites, in 1856 it became a stop on an alternate route of the early San Antonio...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Ashcroft, Colorado

    Prospectors Charles B. Culver and Amos Kindt spent the winter of 1879– 80 at the forks of Castle Creek, 12 miles south of Aspen in central Colorado’s Elk Mountains. In May 1880 Culver and William F. Coxhead filed claims in the area,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Sego, Utah

    Gold and silver drew men west, but coal powered the nation. While most of today’s well-known Western ghost towns prospered during the search for precious metals, Sego was a coal town, supplying fuel for railroads, homes and industry....

  • Wild West Magazine

    Haunted Hotels of the West

    Writer-photographer Bob Stinson, an aficionado of the Wild West and a believer in paranormal activity, recently ventured to a handful of Western hotels, armed only with a camera, in hopes of “shooting” a ghost at rest or otherwise. We...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Terlingua, Texas

    Terlingua, near the Chisos and Christmas mountains in Texas’ Big Bend region, owes its existence to the blood-red ore cinnabar, from which quicksilver, or mercury, is extracted. But its character stems equally from one overbearing Yankee...

  • American History Magazine

    History Happened Here

    Five heritage sites you should go out of your way to visit. Chances are you can quickly tick off the country’s major historic sights: Independence Hall in Philadelphia and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, Bunker Hill in Boston...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: Cross-Country Road Trip

    There had to be an easier way to win a $50 bet. When Dr. Horatio Nelson Jackson wagered in May 1903 that he could drive from San Francisco to New York in 90 days, there were only 150 miles of paved road in the entire country. Jackson (at...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Ural on URLs: The Historical Marker Database

    We’ve all done it. We’ll be driving along a rural road or zipping down a highway when we spot a historical marker off to the side. We find ourselves swerving dangerously onto the shoulder, catching just enough words on the marker to...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Pearl Harbor

    … a date which will live in infamy At 0645 on Dec. 7, 1941, the destroyer USS Ward’s No. 3 deck gun sent a high-explosive round into the conning tower of a Japanese midget submarine attempting to enter Pearl Harbor, the pivotal...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Fort Monroe, Virginia

    Coastal Virginia is seamed by tidal rivers, marshes and creeks that feed into and are fed by Chesapeake Bay, which in turn flows into the Atlantic Ocean. One fragile spit of land sits at the crossroads of this watery world—Old Point...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Oriskany, New York

    On Aug. 6, 1777, Brig. Gen. Nicholas Herkimer, 800 Tryon County militiamen and several dozen Indian scouts stood on an old military road at the edge of a dark forest six miles east of Fort Stanwix (near present-day Oriskany, N.Y.). In...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Bois des Caures, Verdun, France

    At 0715 on Feb. 21, 1916, German artillery started a nine-hour preparatory bombardment of the French fortress city of Verdun. When the shelling ended, lead elements of the VII Reserve Corps and the XVIII Army Corps quickly reached the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Balaklava, Ukraine

    I had read accounts of the October 1854 Battle of Balaklava— the most famous combat action of the Crimean War—since my childhood. I knew the theory of how Britain’s Light Brigade had galloped to its destruction because of muddled...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Hartmannswillerkopf, France

    Hartmannswillerkopf is a 3,136-foot rocky spur on the eastern ridge of the Vosges Mountains in France’s Alsace region. Site of one of the least known of the major World War I battles, it is also one of the most impressive and remarkably...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Vulture, Arizona

    Gold miners first drove picks in Arizona Territory along the Colorado River north of Fort Yuma, afterward fanning out north and east and entering the Hassayampa River valley. In November 1863 German immigrant Henry Wickenburg set out south...