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Travel

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Bodie, California

    In the summer of 1859, W.S. Bodey struck gold in the stark hills north of Mono Lake. Alas, the pioneering prospector froze to death that November in a blizzard less than a mile from his cabin at “Bodey’s Diggings.” Within 20 years,...

  • American History Magazine

    Alaskan Gems

    Lovers of American history will strike gold in Alaska. Here are five must-see stops along the path less traveled in the Last Frontier State. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve At 13 million acres, Wrangell-St. Elias is the...

  • American History Magazine

    Walking Boston’s Historic Freedom Trail

    Boston, known as The Cradle of Liberty, played a central role in the winning of American independence from Great Britain. Nothing shows this better than a leisurely afternoon walking tour of Boston’s historic Freedom Trail. This writer...

  • American History Magazine

    Destinations: Raymond Chandler’s L.A.

    The blonde was tall and wore stiletto heals that could pin your chest to the sidewalk; you’d die, wriggling but smiling up at that smooth, cold face. She wore a black mesh of mourning cloth that hid blue eyes— one that wept over a dead...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The Hallowed Ground of Antietam

    It isn’t easy to unravel the multilayered complexity of the Battle of Antietam, a fight on September 17, 1862, that left 23,000 dead and wounded soldiers in its wake and that some historians consider to be the turning point of the war....

  • AMERICA'S CIVIL WAR MAGAZINE

    Trailside: Coastal Charm of Elizabeth City, N.C.

    Control of coastal North Carolina was critical in the Civil War. The inlets and sounds behind the Outer Banks sheltered ships running the Union blockade. ...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Bastogne, Belgium

    The Belgian market town of Bastogne sits astride seven roads in the midst of the Ardennes Forest. The Ardennes comprises thick stands of fir and pine trees, gorges, brambled hills and rolling plateaus. Roads are at a premium here, vital...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Agincourt, France

    History’s original Band of Brothers, the army of England’s King Henry V, won its stunning victory against an overwhelmingly larger French force on a flat piece of plowed ground only slightly larger than a dozen football fields. The...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Arlington, Virginia

    By the time the sun darts across the Potomac River and casts Arlington House, the old Custis-Lee Mansion, in pink morning light, someone has already raised the flag on the hilltop to half-staff, signaling the start of another day at...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Kall Trail, Germany

    As one hikes down the Kall Trail today in Germany’s Hürtgen Forest, it is almost impossible to visualize how U.S. forces in November 1944 managed to get M4 Sherman tanks and M10 Wolverine tank destroyers down that steep and narrow...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Tarawa, Central Pacific Ocean

    Sixty-five years ago, U.S. Marines launched a daring and most dangerous amphibious assault against Tarawa in the Central Pacific. The bitter battle lasted just 76 hours, but the price in lives and the number of wounded was astounding and...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Grafton, Utah

    In 1849 Elder Parley P. Pratt, the great-great-grandfather of presidential candidate Mitt Romney, led the first Mormons into southwestern Utah, describing it as “a country…turned inside out, upside down, by terrible convulsions in some...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: St. Elmo, Colorado

    In 1875 prospector Dr. Abner Ellis Wright struck gold in Colorado’s remote Chalk Creek Canyon, discovering the vein that would yield the Mary Murphy Mine and support St. Elmo for 50 years. In spring 1880, Griffith Evans and several...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Garnet, Montana

    Lode mines were discovered at the 6,500-foot level in the Garnet Mountains as early as 1867, when prospectors from Bear Gulch, 2,000 feet below, wandered up First Chance Creek looking for the source of their placer gold. But the area was...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Animas Forks, Colorado

    Prospectors first discovered silver in 1873 and settled where several streams met to form the Animas River, 12 miles northeast of present-day Silverton, in Colorado’s San Juan County. Originally called Three Forks of the Animas, the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Chloride, New Mexico

    In 1879 Englishman Harry Pye hid in a gulch from Apaches while transporting freight via an Army mule train to Camp Ojo Caliente in the Black Range of southwestern New Mexico Territory. The site contained a rich vein of silver chloride. The...