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Women’s History

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    ‘Ethiopia’ On Broadway

    New York City women tried to erase the memory of the Draft Riots by helping raise a U.S. Colored Troops regiment. On March 5, 1864, “a vast crowd” of 100,000 New Yorkers “of every shade of color, and every phase of social and...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Rebel Woman: Interview with María Agui Carter

    In 1876 Loreta Janeta Velazquez penned a 600-page memoir, The Woman In Battle, about serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War. Documentary filmmaker María Agui Carter became so intrigued with the historical evidence...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- April 2013

    Broken Wings, Unbreakable Code? Britain’s modern-day code breakers say a message found with bones from a World War II carrier pigeon remains secret, though a Canadian historian claims he cracked the code. David Martin was cleaning a...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Kid Stuff June 2013

    Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon  By Steve Sheinkin 272 pp. Roaring Brook Press, 2013. $20.  The FBI has its eye on Harry Gold, and he has to stay at least one step ahead of them...

  • World War II Magazine

    Their Darkest Hour: With Friends Like These

    THE SECOND WORLD War was not the simple story of good versus evil that Hollywood would have us believe. Not least because in order to defeat the horrors of Nazism, the Western Allies had to form an alliance with a very nasty regime...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artemisia at Salamis

    When the outnumbered Greek feet outfought Xerxes’s great navy in 480 BC, the Persians’ only winner was Artemisia, history’s first known female admiral. In 411 BC the Greek playwright Aristophanes staged his famous play comedy in...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Book Review: Death Zones and Darling Spies

    Death Zones and Darling Spies  by Beverly Deepe Keever, University of Nebraska Press, 2013 The Vietnam conflict established women war correspondents as the equals of their male colleagues, and Beverly Deepe Keever set the bar high for...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    My War: Nancy Jurgevich

    Captain, Women’s Army Corps, October 1968 – December 1970 I grew up in Stoyswood in western Pennsylvania, a small town near the region’s steel mills, but I wanted to travel instead of work in a factory or be a housewife. I enlisted...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    To Tell the World: Wives of POWs

    The wives of POWs in Hanoi’s most notorious prison camp raised their voices to make sure Washington and the world knew the plight of their husbands. THE POWS CALLED IT ALCATRAZ, a Hanoi jail where 11 Americans were separated from other...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Our Woman in Saigon

    He was an American spy. She was a South Vietnamese chemist for an oil firm. They teamed up to root out corruption that threatened her country’s survival. When William R. Johnson arrived in Saigon at the end of 1972 as the new chief of...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: First feminist Angelina Grimke

    Angelina Grimke was like a meteor flashing across the 19th-century sky. Few individuals were more historically consequential. In her life and work, Grimke brought together the two great human rights issues the United States faced in the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Favorite Sons of the Civil War

    Even in war, parents need their children as much as their children need them. They stood together, the wife leaning close to her husband. Grasping his rough hand in hers, she begged him not to go. He was all she had in this world. All but...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Harriet Jacobs’ blunt biography

    This winter thousands of American moviegoers have been introduced to Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery in Louisiana. His life narrative provides the subject of Steve McQueen’s brutally painful new film, 12...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ‘I will never consent’: The Daughter of Jefferson Davis Falls for a...

    All’s not quite fair in love and war for the daughter of Jefferson Davis. Varina Anne “Winnie” Davis, younger daughter of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his second wife, Varina Howell Davis, was born in June 1864, only a...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: ‘In the company’ with Susie King Taylor

    In early April 1862, shortly after Union forces had taken Fort Pulaski in Savannah Harbor, 14-year-old Susie Baker was taken aboard a Federal gunboat and delivered, along with other fugitive slaves, to St. Simon’s Island, Ga. Susie had...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Army Wives’ Emancipation Complications

    In the summer of 1862, as the Union moved to embrace hard war tactics and President Abraham Lincoln contemplated emancipation, the U.S. Congress debated and then passed a confiscation bill that declared “forever free” all slaves of...