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Women’s History

  • Military History Magazine

    Women in War

    In the roughly organized armies of 16th century Europe, there was literally a woman with every man. They were partners in pillage. “When you recruit a regiment of German soldiers today, you do not only acquire 3,000 soldiers; along with...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Neta Snook

    She was more than just Amelia Earhart’s instructor. Anita “Neta” Snook achieved a long list of firsts: first woman aviator in Iowa, first woman student accepted at the Curtiss Flying School in Virginia, first woman to run her own...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Glory & Appendicitis

    Endurance fliers Louise Thaden and Frances Marsalis triumphed over exhaustion—and media hype—in 1932. In July 1932, Louise McPhetridge Thaden received a call from Charles S. “Casey” Jones, manager of Curtiss Airport at Valley...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Finding Amelia

    Finding Amelia: The True Story of the Earhart Disappearance by Ric Gillespie, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., 2006, $28.95. Ric Gillespie has been the most dogged investigator among more than three dozen writers, several of them...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Captive Clara Blinn’s Plea: ‘If you love us save us’

    “A fate worse than death” was a common frontier phrase for what was thought to be the destiny of any woman unfortunate enough to be taken by the Indians. White settlers were captured by Indians for about 300 years, from when the first...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: A Fate Worse Than Death

    A Fate Worse Than Death: Indian Captivities in the West, 1830-1885 by Gregory and Susan Michno, Caxton Press, Caldwell, Idaho, 2007, $24.95. If you were out in the Western plains alone and unarmed in the 19th century, what could be worse...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Walking in Two Worlds

    Walking in Two Worlds: Mixed-Blood Indian Women Seeking Their Path by Nancy M. Peterson, Caxton Press, Caldwell, Idaho, 2006, $16.95. At his First Annual Message in 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant said, “No matter what ought to be the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Belle of Tombstone

    Belle Le Van cut away the rough edges of life on the frontier to shine as a successful business woman. The mining town of Tombstone became one of the best-known places in the American West during Arizona’s territorial days thanks to a...

  • Wild West Magazine

    She Was a Daisey in Oklahoma Territory

    Pioneer, Sooner & newspaperwoman. Petite Nannita Daisey lifted her dusty skirts and plopped her high-top boot onto the platform of the Santa Fe Boomer Special, which would carry her to the “Promised Land” on April 22, 1889....

  • Wild West Magazine

    Newlywed Maggie Graham Met Sudden Disaster in the Desert

    Apaches ambushed her in Texas’ Bass Canyon. The wedding held on September 16, 1879, in Frio Town, Texas, was a well-attended, luxurious affair. The guests packed the second story of the courthouse, where the reception was held. Long...

  • American History Magazine

    Power and Vitality: Margaret Bourke-White

    On the evening of October 29, 1929, a 25-year-old photographer entered the First National Bank of Boston hoping the building would be empty, so she could finish shooting pictures of its new lobby for an advertisement. Instead, she found...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Shout, Sister, Shout

    Shout, Sister, Shout: The Untold Story of Rock-and-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe By Gayle F. Wald, Beacon Press, 2007 It’s a truism about rock ’n’ roll—and about most other things: The more you know, the more you realize...

  • American History Magazine

    Glow in the Dark Tragedy

    Fatally poisoned by the glowing paint they used on the job, the ‘Radium Girls’ challenged workplace safety rules and helped shed light on the unseen dangers of radioactivity. When Grace Fryer landed a job at the United States Radium...

  • American History Magazine

    Dialogue: Maythee Rojas on a Gold Rush Hanging

    On July 5, 1851, a Mexican woman became the only woman ever hanged for murder in the state of California. She was charged with killing Frederick Cannon, a white man, in the gold mining town of Downieville. The incident has become part of...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Diary of a Union Lady

    Diary of a Union Lady, 1861-1865 by Maria Lydig Daly Internal discord, debate and bitter disagreement afflict all nations at war. The latitude given to dissenting opinions tells us a great deal about that nation’s commitment to...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Mary Todd Lincoln’s Lost Letters

    Just found, 25 notes cast new light on the manic-depressed first lady. On July 2, 1863, while a ferocious battle raged between Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and George Meade’s Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, Mary...