Aircraft Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Aircraft

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Neta Snook

    She was more than just Amelia Earhart’s instructor. Anita “Neta” Snook achieved a long list of firsts: first woman aviator in Iowa, first woman student accepted at the Curtiss Flying School in Virginia, first woman to run her own...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Too Hot to Handle

    The Macchi-Castoldi M.C.72 wrote a record-breaking epilogue to the Schneider Trophy races. Jacques Schneider, the son of a French steel and arms manufacturer, was a great aviation enthusiast. He came to believe that floatplanes and flying...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Scramjet Success

    March 27, 2004, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.—NASA’s experimental X-43 scramjet took off for its second test. It had plenty of help taking to the sky—it was appended to a modified Pegasus rocket booster, attached to a Boeing B-52B....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Albert Berry’s Leap of Fate

    March 1, 1912, Jefferson Barracks, MO.—Captain Albert Berry makes the first successful parachute jump from a moving airplane, touching down at this U.S. Army base just outside St. Louis. The Benoist biplane, piloted by Berry’s friend...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: The American Aircraft Factory in World War II

    The American Aircraft Factory in World War II (Zenith Press, St Paul, Minn., 2006, $40) Bill Yenne keeps his reputation for consistent quality in his nostalgic book The American Aircraft Factory in World War II. He provides a context for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    We Guide to Strike

    Gil Cohen’s ASAA “Award of Distinction” tribute to British Pathfinders. Gil Cohen’s painting We Guide to Strike is an example of his ability to offer insight into the emotions and character of his subjects while utilizing their...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MiG: Learning By Trial and Error

    The design bureau’s early years were marked by as many failures as successes, but the company would go on to produce some of history’s greatest fighter aircraft. Alesksei N. ”Lesha” Grinchik had only seconds to live. As he bottomed...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Britain’s ‘Bloody Paralyzer’

    Frederick Handley Page produced the RAF’s first successful strategic bombers. The first really large bombers to be produced in substantial numbers and employed in massed formations in a coordinated strategic offensive, the Handley Page...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Clippers Circle the Globe

    The attack on Pearl Harbor forced one Pan Am crew to attempt a round-the-world flight. It was a few minutes before 6 a.m. and still very dark on January 6, 1942, when the control tower at New York’s LaGuardia Airport received a radio...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    ‘Flying Classroom’ Reinvented

    Convair T-29A back on duty at the Strategic Air & Space Museum. After nearly a quarter-century in retirement, the Strategic Air & Space Museum’s Convair (Consolidated Vultee) T-29A is once again ready for duty in its original...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Curtiss A-18 Shrike

    Though less successful than Messerschmitt’s Bf-110, the A-18 was proof that a six-ton twin-engine attack plane could do the job. The time-worn formulas of World War I— wood and fabric construction, open cockpits, fixed undercarriage...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fritz Opel’s Manned Rocket

    June 11, 1928, Wasserkrupe, Germany— The world’s first rocket-propelled manned aircraft took to the sky. The sailplane, designed by Alexander Lippisch and called the Ente (German for “duck”), was powered by two black-powder rockets...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: I’ll Fly Away

    I’ll Fly Away: A World War II Pilot’s Lifetime of Adventures From Biplanes to Jumbo Jets by Jack Race with William F. Hallstead, University of Scranton Press, Scranton, Pa., 2006, $20 softcover. Jack Race soloed in an Aeronca C-3 at...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The U.S. Navy’s Last Flying Boat

    Development of Martin’s P6M was delayed until its time ran out. Middle River, Maryland, July 14, 1955: Martin Aircraft’s XP6M-1 Seamaster, the world’s first jet-powered seaplane, taxied into the river for the first flight of what one...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Paper Airplanes

    On the eve of World War II, the U.S. Army Air Corps ordered hundreds of medium bombers right off the drawing board—before they had even been test flown. In the late 1930s, U.S. Army Air Corps doctrine had been centered on using...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Return to USS Macon

    More than 70 years after the giant airship went down off the coast of California, a research expedition captures ghostly images of genius from a bygone era. Sitting inside Western Flyer’s command center three miles off the California...