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  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Review: Destroyed Japanese Zero

    Destroyed Japanese Zero As the Allies’ nemesis in the Pacific air war, the Zero epitomized Japanese air power. Combining excellent maneuverability and range, the Mitsubishi A6M Zero gained a legendary reputation early in the war. As the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Juan Trippe’s World

    How one ambitious American businessman—and his fleet of silver planes—helped the Allies win the war. As searchlights scoured the skies over blacked-out, bomb-battered London in June 1941, Juan Trippe stood atop the roof of his hotel,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    They Can’t Realize the Change Aviation Has Made

    Charles A. Lindbergh was convinced that the airplane gave the Nazis an unbeatable edge. His fears set the tone—and the terms—of the war debate in America.  ON THE SAME SEPTEMBER DAY IN 1938 that Neville Chamberlain returned in...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Dinky Toys Aircraft

    Dinky Toys Aircraft: 1934-1979 by Geoffrey Randolph “GR” Webster, blurb.com, London, 2011, $95.95 Funny thing about history: Time can confer it on anything and everything. After Liverpool-based Dinky Toys began producing die-cast metal...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: The Curtiss Hydroaeroplane

    The Curtiss Hydroaeroplane: The U.S. Navy’s First Airplane 1911-1916 by Bob Woodling and Taras Chayka, Schiffer Publishing, Atglen, Pa., 2011, $59.99 The Hydroaeroplane was the brainchild of Glenn Hammond Curtiss, who had made his name...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Last Gunfighter: F-8 Crusader

    Vought’s F-8 Crusader successfully bridged the gap between the days of close-quarters dogfighting and the supersonic era of long-range missile engagements. The carrier plowed through the gale- wracked Barents Sea, its escorts shedding...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The War of Electricity

    Long before he gained fame as the leader of Britain’s “Dambuster” raid, Guy Gibson helped pioneer night fighter radar interception during the dark days of the Blitz. On a gray, wet day in November 1940, Flight Lieutenant Guy Penrose...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Game Changers- The 15 Most Influential Aircraft

    Aviation is full of firsts—first flight, first dogfight,first crossing of this or that, first jet, first widebody. And some firsts are debatable. New Zealanders still insist that secretive savant Richard Pearse beat the Wright brothers...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Saving a Whale

    A team of U.S. Navy retirees rescues an abandoned Douglas Skywarrior—and finds it a new home. Th 40 years on an abandoned runway at Edwards Air Force Base, visited only by rattlesnakes, souvenir hunters and e A-3A Skywarrior sat grounded...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Project Tip-Tow

    The “floating wingtip” concept led to Cold War experiments that had pilots tip-towing on the verge of disaster. The history of aviation is full of ideas that seemed ingenious when first pro- posed but failed in practice. These notions...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Story of the Republic XR-12 Rainbow

    World’s Fastest Four-Engine Piston-Powered Aircraft: Story of the Republic XR-12 Rainbow by Mike Machat, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2011, $32.95 Artist, publisher and author Mike Machat actually offers two books in one here....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Airline of the Jet Age

    Airline of the Jet Age: A History by R.E.G. Davies, Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, Washington, D.C., 2011, $99.95 Many words describe this book, including encyclopedic, impressive, indispensible and groundbreaking. But sadly, the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Republic’s Fleeting Masterpiece

    Despite its sleek lines and unparalleled performance, there would be no pot of gold at the end of this Rainbow. In real estate, it’s location, location, location. In aircraft, it’s timing, timing, timing. Some examples proving this...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Meatboxes Versus Doodlebugs

    Although Britain’s first operational jet never mixed it up with the Messerschmitt Me-262, the Gloster Meteor did take on a dangerous jet-powered opponent. The first two confrontations between the jet-propelled aircraft of opposing air...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Modest Mal

    For airline pilot Mal Freeburg, handling in-flight emergencies was all in a day’s work. The bad news traveled fast on a beautiful afternoon at St. Paul’s Municipal Airport in April 1932. Sitting in Northwest Airway’s Minnesota...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Bent-Wing Phoenix

    Jim Tobul’s prize-winning F4U Corsair Korean War Veteran has beat the odds—twice. All too few warbirds are rescued from the scrap heap, carefully restored and returned to the air. Even fewer get rebuilt a second time after a crash. Jim...