Paid Advertisement
Historynet/feed historynet feedback facebook link Weider History Group RSS feed Weider Subscriptions Historynet Home page

Wyatt Earp

Facts, information and articles about Wyatt Earp, a famous sheriff from the gunfight at the O.K. Corral in the Wild West

Wyatt Earp Facts

Born

March 19, 1848

Died

January 13, 1929

Notable For

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

Spouse

Urilla Sutherland (wife)
Celia Ann “Mattie” Blaylock (common law wife)
Josephine Sarah Marcus (common law wife)

Wyatt Earp Articles

Explore articles from the History Net archives about Wyatt Earp

» See all Wyatt Earp Articles

Wyatt Earp summary: Wyatt Earp was born in Monmouth, Illinois. He had a half-brother Newton and a half-sister Mariah Ann from his father’s first marriage. In March of 1849 the whole family started to move to California. They got as far as Iowa and decided to settle there instead. Seven years later, his father sold his 160-acre farm and returned to his home state Illinois. His father got into legal trouble and the family left for Iowa once again. His father cleared his name in Illinois and after reuniting with his family, enlisted in the Army. After recovery from a serious wound, the family set out to follow their original dream and headed to California in 1864.

Wyatt-earp-1923-lg
Wyatt-earp-1923-lg

Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp began his work in law enforcement in Kansas where he held the title of Assistant City Marshall. He also worked as a local constable in 1869 when his father, who held the job prior to him, became Justice of the Peace. Later that year, Wyatt Earp fell in love with Urilla Sutherland. They were married early in 1870. Urilla was about to give birth to their first child when typhoid fever took her life and that of the child.

Wyatt Earp moved to Tombstone, Arizona with his common law wife in 1879. By 1880, several of his brothers and their wives, including his good friend Doc Holiday and his common law wife, all lived in Tombstone. He was elected deputy sheriff in part of Pima County and later became a U.S. Marshall. He made a name there for himself by cleaning up the county of unlawful men.


 

Articles Featuring Wyatt Earp From History Net Magazines

Wyatt Earp’s Vendetta Posse

At about 11:30 p.m. on December 28, 1881, some two months after the so-called Gunfight at the O.K. Corral had rocked Tombstone, assassins opened fire on City Police Chief Virgil Earp outside the Oriental Saloon in that same divided community. At least three men fired double-barrel shotguns from their dark hiding place across the street. Virgil’s left side took most of the pellets, and doctors were forced to remove several inches of shattered bone from his upper left arm. Virgil’s distraught brother Wyatt was still assuming the worst when he telegraphed Crawley P. Dake, the U.S. marshal for Arizona Territory, a few hours later.

Tombstone, Arizona Territory, December 29, 1881
Virgil Earp was shot by concealed assassins last night. His wounds are fatal. Telegraph me appointment with power to appoint deputies. Local authorities are doing nothing. The lives of other citizens are threatened.
-Wyatt Earp

Marshal Dake readily agreed, and Wyatt Earp, now with federal authority, assembled a posse of gunmen to protect his family and to hunt for the men who had shot his brother. One of the prime suspects was Ike Clanton, who wanted revenge after an inquest had cleared the Earp brothers of any wrongdoing in the O.K. Corral fight.

Read More in Wild West Magazine

Subscribe online and save nearly 40%!!!

Wyatt knew he must choose trustworthy men who would not be intimidated by further threats or acts of violence by the Cowboys, the group of alleged rustlers who had lost three of their own (Billy Clanton, Tom McLaury and Frank McLaury) in the October 26, 1881, street fight with three Earps (Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan) and Doc Holliday. The possemen not only would help Deputy U.S. Marshal Wyatt Earp enforce the law but also would act as bodyguards for the Earp brothers (Warren, as well as Morgan and Virgil) and their wives. Doc Holliday, a gambler, a lunger and a diehard friend, continued to stand by Wyatt during these dark days, and now the deputy marshal gathered some more help — gunmen who had mysterious, if not dubious, backgrounds and tough reputations. For $5 a day, these men were willing to place themselves in extreme danger, though they all probably had different motivations for riding with Wyatt Earp.

In 1882 (from left) Sherman McMaster, Wyatt Earp and DocHolliday lead the charge after their Cowboy enemies during Earp’s Vendetta, which is also the name of this Bud Bradshaw painting.

The first of these men was John “Texas Jack” Vermillion. A carpenter by trade who was said to have hailed from Virginia (not Texas), Vermillion gave his age as 36 in 1881. He had arrived in Tombstone from New Mexico Territory and had proved his worth to the Earps after the June 1881 town fire, when he was deputized by Virgil to help keep lot jumpers at bay. Here was a man who could enforce the law in times of trouble. Vermillion apparently wore his hair long and was sometimes called “Shoot-Your-Eye-Out Jack.” Recent researchers have said that his full name was John Wilson Vermillion, that he had been a sharpshooter with the Virginia Cavalry during the Civil War, and that he was rumored to have been a lawman in Missouri.

Sherman W. McMaster, who was 28 in 1881, was the most complex and valuable deputy among Earp’s group, as he possessed an extensive knowledge of the local terrain and personally knew many of the Cowboys said to be gunning for the Earp family. Born in Galena, Ill., to a wealthy family and well educated in Rock Island, Ill., McMaster saw service with the Texas Rangers in 1878-79. Stationed in El Paso, he tracked renegade Indians, chased horse thieves, and acted as a scout for the 9th Cavalry, which was situated nearby.

McMaster’s Texas Ranger Company held outlaw (and future Clanton and McLaury confederate) “Curly Bill” Brocius prisoner over a five-month period in 1878, and McMaster was later said to have associated with the San Simon Cowboys. To further complicate matters, Sherman was also accused of army mule theft and stage robbery in company with the infamous Cowboy Pony Diehl. Although these charges were never proved, Wyatt admitted that McMaster had been friendly with the Cowboy element, and he was, therefore, able to make use of his inside knowledge. McMaster spoke fluent Spanish, rode fine horses and was skilled with a gun (Bat Masterson’s brother Thomas called McMaster the fastest man on the draw he had seen). He is thought by some to have been an undercover operative for not only Earp but also Wells Fargo. If that was true, McMaster’s open association with the Earp posse ended any hope he had of staying in Arizona, and he may have seen Wyatt’s posse as his paid ticket out of the territory.

Perhaps the most dangerous man deputized by Wyatt Earp was Jack Johnson. Earp biographer Stuart Lake referred to him as “Turkey Creek Jack” Johnson, but his real name, according to Wyatt, was John William Blount. He was 34 in 1881 and had a unique reason for joining the posse. A native of Missouri who was raised in the lead mining area of Neosho, he became a wanted man and was forced to flee the state in 1877 after he and his brothers were involved in a violent street battle in Webb City, Mo. One brother, Bud, killed a man in a quarrel in May 1881 in Tip Top, Arizona Territory, and was sent to Yuma Prison. John Blount, using the alias Jack Johnson, then went to Tombstone to see if Wyatt Earp could help get his brother pardoned. Indeed, Wyatt assisted with a petition to the governor, and Bud Blount was eventually freed. As a way to repay his debt, Johnson joined the posse. Johnson was also said to have previously associated with the Cowboys and therefore, like McMaster, was able to pass on important inside information.

Origen Charles Smith and Daniel “Tip” Tipton, two gamblers who supplemented their incomes with mining ventures, completed the Earp posse. Smith, a 37-year-old native of Connecticut, had a close and long connection to the Earp family. Charlie was fluent in Spanish, having spent several years in Texas working in saloons. In Fort Worth he had been associated with barman James Earp, the oldest of the Earp boys, as well as saloon owner and future Earp business partner Robert J. Winders. Smith took a hand in at least two Fort Worth gunfights and sustained a serious chest wound in 1878. The following year, Smith came to Tombstone with Winders and immediately became associated with all the Earps.

Tipton, also 37, arrived in Tombstone in March 1881 with a shady reputation earned during the early days of the mining boom in Virginia City, Nev. Tipton, who sported several tattoos on his hands and forearms, was a former Civil War Union seaman who took up mining and gambling after the war. In 1879 he spent time in the Gunnison district of Colorado before coming to Tombstone at the request of his friend Lou Rickabaugh, a gambling kingpin who needed help during the town’s so-called Gamblers War (see story in the October 2004 Wild West). Ricka­baugh was a business partner of Wyatt Earp. Tipton was said to have traveled to Tombstone in the company of another Earp ally, Bat Masterson. By the time of the serious trouble with the Cowboys in October 1881, Masterson had left Tombstone, but Tipton was still there supporting the Earp faction.

COWBOY WATCH AT THE COSMOPOLITAN
Wyatt Earp’s early prognosis about his wounded brother was wrong. By mid-January 1882, Virgil’s condition had improved slightly, and Wyatt decided to headquarter the Earp families with Virgil at the Cosmopolitan Hotel for safekeeping. Tombstone was a powder keg, and Wyatt knew there was safety in numbers. On January 17, 1882, Doc Holliday and Cowboy rival Johnny Ringo had a much-celebrated standoff on Allen Street. The men faced off with their hands on their revolvers, but a town deputy prevented them from taking matters any further. On the same day, gambler and Earp ally Lou Rickabaugh came to blows with Ben Maynard, a Cowboy associate, but they were separated before weapons could be used.

After spending the first half of January watching out for Cowboys and watching over his injured brother, who had lost the use of his left arm but would survive, Wyatt Earp decided it was time for action. On January 23, 1882, Wyatt and his possemen rode out of Tombstone with warrants for Virgil’s suspected attackers — Ike and Fin Clanton and Pony Diehl. On the ride, they arrested the fiery Maynard and forced him to lead the way as they descended on the nearby Cowboy hangout of Charleston. The posse went door to door in Charleston but failed to find the Clantons or Diehl. After riding out of town, the men scouted through the countryside, eventually setting up a camp near Tombstone at a place known as Pick-em-up.

Unbeknown to Wyatt, the Clanton brothers had surrendered themselves and were already back in Tombstone. To make matters worse, on January 30, a deputy sheriff rode out to Pick-em-up and served his own warrant on Earp posseman Sherman McMaster, who was wanted for “borrowing” two horses from the Contention mine the previous fall. No resistance was offered, and the entire Earp posse returned to Tombstone, where McMaster was bailed, and he and Charlie Smith booked into the Cosmopolitan Hotel.

Courtroom dramas dominated the Tombstone newspapers throughout February 1882, as both factions sought justice through the legal system. McMaster gave evidence against Ike Clanton during the latter’s hearing on the attempted murder of Virgil Earp. Although Ike’s hat was found at the scene of the crime, he provided an alibi and the charges were dismissed due to inconclusive evidence.

On February 9, Ike Clanton went to the town of Contention and filed new charges against the Earps and Doc Holliday relating to the O.K. Corral shootout, but these charges were later dismissed. With tensions close to breaking point on February 15, Earp deputy Dan Tipton and the ever-ready Ben Maynard came close to a gunfight in Tombstone’s Alhambra Saloon. Tipton was left with a bloody eye, and both men were fined. Two days later, the Earp posse was riding again. Heavily armed, they left Tombstone with warrants for the arrest of Pony Diehl, who was now wanted for a January 1882 stage robbery. That expedition proved fruitless, and Wyatt and his men eventually returned empty-handed to town.

As March 1882 progressed, an uneasy quiet fell over Tombstone. Wyatt and his men had heard that the Cowboys were plotting more revenge attacks, but no one knew for sure when, or where, the attacks would take place. There seemed to be an air of inevitability about further violence occurring. Tipton would later state that members of the Earp faction had been repeatedly warned to be on the lookout for a Cowboy ambush, and on March 18, it finally came. At about 11 p.m., Morgan Earp was playing pool at Campbell and Hatch’s Saloon, while Tipton, McMaster and Wyatt watched. As Morgan turned his back to a rear door to play a shot, gunshots tore through the door widows and struck him in the back. Morgan collapsed at the scene and died within the hour.

Read More in Wild West Magazine

Subscribe online and save nearly 40%!!!

A coroner’s jury later identified the men suspected of killing Morgan as Cochise County Deputy Frank Stilwell, his friend Pete Spence (or Spencer), and three of Spence’s employees — Indian Charlie, Frederick Bode and an unnamed half-breed. The cowardly assassination of his brother was a turning point for Earp and his posse. Until that time, Wyatt had attempted to rely on the legal system to bring Virgil’s assailants to justice. He now understood the futility of that effort and knew the only way to deal with Morgan’s murderers was to kill them.

VENDETTA CLAIMS FIRST VICTIM
Before he could concentrate on the hunt, Wyatt had to secure what was left of his family. Morgan’s coffin was loaded on a train, and James Earp accompanied it to Colton, Calif., where Morgan’s distraught widow, Louisa, was residing. The wives of James and Wyatt, Bessie and Mattie, would follow five days later. Wyatt and his men then escorted Virgil and his wife, Allie, to the train station at Contention. The original plan was to see them safely as far as Benson, but reports came in that Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell had been seen in Tucson. Fearing another ambush, Wyatt and Warren Earp, Sherman McMaster, Doc Holliday and Jack Johnson boarded their train on March 20 and guarded Virgil and his wife all the way through to Tucson. A passenger later commented that the men carried pistols, rifles and shotguns and that McMaster wore two belts of cartridges.

The party arrived safely at Tucson that evening and went to the nearby Porter’s Hotel for dinner. At the end of the meal, the rest of the group helped Virgil and Allie back onto the westbound train. At that point, two men thought to be Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell were seen lying on nearby flatcars with guns pointed at the train. Wyatt quickly alighted from the train and moved quietly between the cars. He would later claim that both men saw him and ran. Wyatt chased hard after the men, who separated among the rail cars. McMaster, Holliday and Johnson also gave chase. A railroad fireman testified that he saw one man running along the tracks followed by four armed pursuers. Wyatt claimed that he caught up with one would-be assassin and fired both barrels of his shotgun when the man made a grab for it. The remaining posse members then arrived at the bloody scene and proceeded to fire more shots into the corpse. The dead man was Frank Stilwell.

Stilwell’s corpse was found in the Tucson rail yard the next morning, but Earp and his men were long gone. A witness would later say that he heard six to 10 shots and at the same time heard men cheering. One eyewitness claimed that Stilwell “was shot all over…the worst shot-up man I ever saw.” The coroner’s inquest later found at least five separate gunshot wounds on the body — one for each member of the Earp posse. They had wanted to send a clear message to Ike Clanton and the other Cowboys: There would be no more attempted arrests from now on; Wyatt and his men would dispense their own law.

After the killing, Wyatt and his possemen had watched Virgil’s train depart and then had searched the rail yard for Clanton and his men. Having no luck, they then walked in the darkness to the Papago station, where they hopped a freight train and rode back to Benson. Next, the group rented a wagon and drove to Con­tention, probably joining “Texas Jack” Vermillion, who had not traveled to Tucson but had stayed behind in Contention with their horses. The posse then rode back to Tombstone and immediately went to the Cosmopolitan Hotel. Later that day, Charlie Smith and Dan Tipton joined them, and plans were made to again leave town.

The coroner’s jury in Tucson duly found that five members of Earp’s posse were responsible for the death of Stilwell, and warrants were issued for their arrest. A telegram sent to Sheriff John Behan in Tombstone advised him that his deputy had been murdered and asked him to detain the men responsible. When Behan arrived at the Cosmopolitan Hotel, he found Earp and his posse walking through the lobby to the street, armed to the teeth and in no mood to chat. Behan approached the group and said he wanted to see Wyatt, but all the men brushed past him. As Wyatt passed the ineffectual sheriff, he remarked, “You may see me once too often,” or something similar. He and his men strode on to a nearby corral, where they mounted their horses and rode defiantly out of Tombstone.

After spending that night in a camp outside of town, the Earp posse rode hard in the direction of the Dragoon Mountains. Pete Spence operated a woodcutting business in the foothills, and the posse hoped to catch not only Spence but also the other three men named in the coroner’s report. On the morning of March 22, Wyatt’s party rode into Spence’s camp, but failed to find him. Spence had judiciously surrendered in Tombstone, and an Indian known as Hank had already been arrested. Two Earp posse members, probably McMaster and Smith, questioned a worker in Spanish at the camp, and then the group rode up a hill in the direction of a half blood known as Florentino.

The eight-man posse must have been convinced they had their man, because they opened fire. Florentino ran but was quickly brought down in a hail of bullets. Wyatt Earp would later say that Florentino was one of the men who had stood watch for the murderers on the night Morgan was killed. During the inquest into the half blood’s death, he was further identified as Florentino Cruz. The Arizona Weekly Citizen later published a letter, stating that he was also known as Philomeno Sais, and he was wanted in connection with the robbery and murder of two U.S. marshals in 1878. The Arizona Weekly Star added weight to this argument, as it had previously identified the 1878 murderer as Florentino Saiz. Whatever his correct name, he was guilty as far as the Earp posse was concerned.

After the killing, the posse rode out of the area, and on March 23, Smith and Tipton separated from the others to obtain information in Tombstone. The two men immediately ran into trouble. Sheriff Behan liked the odds this time and arrested both of them for “resisting arrest and conspiracy.” The men were immediately bailed, and Smith left town to rendezvous with the posse while Tipton remained in Tombstone. Smith met with Earp and then was sent back to town to obtain $1,000 in expense money for the posse. Wyatt and his men were to meet Smith later in the Whetstone Mountains, at a watering hole known as Iron Springs.

SHOOTOUT AT IRON SPRINGS
Back in Tombstone, a coroner’s inquest found that Florentino Cruz was killed by Wyatt and Warren Earp, Sherman McMaster, Jack Johnson, Doc Holliday, Texas Jack and two other unnamed gunmen (Dan Tipton and Charlie Smith). Sheriff Behan then organized his own posse and set out after the wanted men. Behan drew criticism as his group included noted Cowboys Johnny Ringo, Fin Clanton and Johnny Barnes. A second posse, made up of Charleston Cowboys, also took to the field. On March 24, that bunch rode into Contention, and a witness reported that the Charleston contingent was well mounted, well armed and hunting for the Earp posse.

The afternoon of the 24th was warm, and Wyatt loosened his cartridge belt as he led his men toward Iron Springs. To his surprise he did not find Charlie Smith but a gang of Cowboys, who opened fire without warning. Earp jumped from his horse with a shotgun in his hands, while McMaster, Johnson and Doc Holliday wheeled their horses and sought cover. Vermillion’s horse was shot and collapsed, pinning Texas Jack’s leg. At the first shot, according to Earp, McMaster recognized “Curly Bill” Brocius and cried out his name.

Earp then returned fire and blasted Brocius with his double-barrel shotgun, almost cutting the Cowboy in two. Amid the gun smoke and mayhem, Wyatt pulled up his cartridge belt and attempted to mount his horse while taking fire from the remaining Cowboys. He fired in their general direction as Cowboy bullets struck the pommel of his saddle and the heel of his boot. One slug hit with such force that Earp believed he had been wounded. He somehow managed to partially mount his horse and scampered back to safety, picking up Texas Jack Vermillion as he went.

The Earp posse had miraculously survived the gunfight without any serious casualties, other than the loss of Texas Jack’s horse. Bullets had perforated Wyatt’s coattails and McMaster had sustained a grazed side when a bullet cut through the straps of his field glasses and tore through his clothes. The posse rested, counted their blessings and then rode back toward Tombstone. The Cowboys would later deny that Curly Bill Brocius had been killed at Iron Springs. Although debate raged in the Tombstone newspapers, Earp always maintained he had blasted Brocius, and the fact remained that Curly Bill was never seen in Tombstone again.

Charlie Smith’s exact movements are hard to trace at this stage. Apparently he rejoined Earp’s posse just after the Iron Springs shootout, but he did not supply the much-needed funds. That task would eventually fall to Dan Tipton. In any case, on March 26 Earp and his men rode out to Dragoon Summit Station, where they stopped an eastbound train at 1 p.m. and hunted unsuccessfully through the carriages. Whether they expected to find a messenger with additional funds, or Ike Clanton himself, is not exactly clear. They needed money and a place to rest before deciding their next move, so they rode north to Henry Clay Hooker’s Sierra Bonita Ranch. Hooker was an influential cattle rancher in nearby Graham County and a supporter of Earp’s actions.

The Earp posse arrived at Sierra Bonita on March 27. There, they fed their worn-out horses and took advantage of Hooker’s hospitality. Early that same morning, Dan Tipton left Tombstone on the first stage heading for Benson, carrying $1,000 from mining man E.B. Gage for the posse. At Benson, Tipton boarded a train to Willcox, where he rented a horse and rode to Hooker’s ranch. Lou Cooley, a stage driver and likely Wells Fargo operative, also provided the Earp posse with additional funds, from the express company. Wyatt and his seven men now had traveling money and fresh horses. They left Hooker’s ranch the next morning and set up a camp on a nearby butte. From their vantage point, they could see the approach of any riders from rival posses, and they waited for a possible confrontation. It never came. Sheriff Behan and his men eventually arrived at Sierra Bonita, but they were refused assistance. According to one report, Hooker mockingly told Behan where to find the Earps, but the sheriff rode off in the opposite direction.

The eight-man Earp posse remained in the area for a few more days, but the so-called Vendetta had run its course. With two hostile posses on their trail, Wyatt and his men were outnumbered and knew it would be extremely dangerous to stay in Arizona any longer. Early in April 1882, Wyatt and his posse rode to Silver City, New Mexico Territory. They spent one night in the home of a friend, and the next day sold their horses and saddles, before taking a stage to Deming. From there they traveled by train to Albuquerque and made plans to move to the relative safety of Colorado. Charlie Smith parted company with the group in Silver City and headed back to make Tombstone his home. He was the only member of the Earp posse to do so.

Read More in Wild West Magazine

Subscribe online and save nearly 40%!!!

Once in Colorado, the posse fragmented. Wyatt and Warren Earp, Dan Tipton and Texas Jack Vermillion headquartered at Gunnison. Doc Holliday went to Denver, while Johnson and McMaster probably reunited with their respective brothers in Leadville. The men had found their sanctuary, as Colorado Governor Frederick Pitkin refused extradition requests from the Arizona territorial authorities.

In time, the law did catch up with some of the surviving Cowboys. Johnny Ringo was shot dead — some say by his own hand — in July 1882, while Ike Clanton was gunned down in 1887 resisting arrest. Johnny Barnes was said to have died of wounds sustained at the Iron Springs shootout, while Pete Spence, Fin Clanton and Pony Diehl were eventually convicted of various crimes and all did time in state penitentiaries.


Peter Brand, from Australia, has done extensive research on the Vendetta (see his Web site www.tombstonevendetta.com) and writes for the Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association (WOLA) Journal and the National Outlaw-Lawman Association (NOLA) Quarterly. See his “Daniel Tipton and the Earp Vendetta Posse” in the Fall 2000 NOLA Quarterly, and his “Sherman W. McMaster: The El Paso Salt War, Texas Rangers and Tombstone” in the Fall 1999 WOLA Journal. This article originally appeared in the March 2007 issue of Wild West magazine. For more great articles be sure to subscribe to Wild West magazine today!

Wyatt Earp in Seattle

Gambling was illegal in Seattle in 1899, but three gambling houses existed in a combine run by gambling kingpin John Considine. The established gamblers paid their fines to the city and county and were prepared to crush anyone who dared enter their territory and open up a gambling house.

No one opposed the combine until late November of that year, when a Westerner best known for his gun-related activities in Tombstone, Arizona Territory, 18 years earlier made his presence felt in Washington’s largest city. The Seattle Star ran the following item on November 25 about the new gambler in town:

SHERIFF FROM ARIZONA TO OPEN A GAMBLING HOUSE
Considine’s Combine Greatly Disturbed
over the Outlook.
The New Man Refuses to Put Up
Says He Will Run in Spite of Opposition
Won’t Knuckle to Chief of Police
Reed or Anybody Else
Racy Developments.

The “sheriff from Arizona” was Wyatt Earp, who indeed had been a lawman in Arizona Territory, including the post of deputy sheriff of Pima County under Sheriff Charles Shibell. Since then he had been mostly a capitalist—saloon keeper, gambler, horse breeder, boxing referee, etc.—in such places as Colorado, Idaho Territory, San Diego, San Francisco and Alaska Territory. Now, Earp was going to open a new gambling house in Seattle’s tenderloin district. The Seattle Star, in almost purple journalistic jargon, described the new man on the scene: “Wyatt Earp, a man of great reputation among the toughs and criminals, inasmuch as he formerly walked the streets of a rough frontier mining town with big pistols stuck in his belt, spurs on his boots and a devil-may-care expression upon his official face.”

The Seattle Daily Times had a different approach. That newspaper announced in a very small article that Wyatt Earp, who had a reputation in Arizona as a “bad man,” was going to open a gambling house. Both the Times and the Seattle Post Intelligencer mentioned Earp’s boondoggle with the Tom Sharkey–Bob Fitzsimmons fight in 1896 San Francisco, where Wyatt was the referee who awarded the decision to Sharkey on an alleged foul. Fitzsimmons had knocked Sharkey out. Wyatt, among others, was accused of fraud by the Fitzsimmons side. The case had gone to court and although there was no ruling by the judge regarding Wyatt’s role, he had been smeared in the press. The Post Intelligencer described Earp as a “quiet sort of individual, good natured and does not talk much.”

Wyatt Earp took on a partner in his new Seattle venture, Thomas Urquhart. He was a well-known sporting man in Seattle and had supposedly been around the area for several years. Earp and Urquhart opened the Union Club at 111 Second Ave. South, near Yesler Way. Urquhart would continue to run the Union Club after Earp went back to Alaska in the spring or summer of 1900.

Upon learning that Earp intended to open a gambling house, the Considine combine sent a representative to inform Wyatt that he should take his interests outside of Seattle. The gamblers suggested if he really did intend to open in Seattle, he should check with Police Chief C.S. Reed. The assumption on their part was that Reed would not find Earp acceptable. The police chief had taken an extended vacation at this particularly dicey time in Seattle’s history, and Wyatt had no intention of waiting for his return. Earp, according to the Seattle Star of November 11, 1899, told them, “You fellows are paying enough, why should I add any money?” Furthermore, Earp boldly stated, “If Reed closes me up, he will have to close you all up too. See.” The newspaper recognized the threat to the gambling fraternity, stating, “Of course Earp expects a war to the knife to be waged up on [sic] him by the combine, but as his fighting powers are said to be so good and his wind excellent, the chances are that he will put up a pretty strong defense, and may come out the winner.”

Gambling had been shut down in Seattle in April 1899, but in September it had been reopened with John Considine as leader of the gambling trust. While gambling was still illegal, it was permitted under certain conditions. The leading gamblers laid down the rules during a September meeting in the office of Police Chief Reed, and these rules were in place two months later when partners Earp and Urquhart opened their doors:

No. 1 No minors allowed to participate.
No. 2 No drunks admitted.
No. 3 Must place door-tenders.
No. 4 No crap or blackjack games.
No. 5 Police to notify when fines are due.
No. 6 Doors to close at 3 a.m. except on
Saturday night. When business
must close at midnight.
No. 7 No entrance to gambling games
from any saloon.

The city was reaping a bountiful harvest in fines, and the gambling houses employed about 1,000 men. Gambling was big business in Seattle, and the established proprietors had a promising future. In October 1899, the Star interviewed a gentleman identified only as a “well known sporting man” who claimed to be an insider in the gambling fraternity: “Several days ago I overheard a conversation between Dave Argyle, one of the proprietors of the White House, in which he stated that the Seattle gamblers ‘cut up’ $50,000 in their last monthly settlement, and if permitted to run until April, would clear between $350,000 and $300,000 above all expenses including ‘hush money.’”

The Seattle Star sent a reporter around to the gambling houses on December 12, 1899, and reported in next day’s edition: “Earp and Urquhart’s new house, the Union Club…is having a large patronage. When it was first opened, about two weeks ago, five games were run. Last night the management placed several new games on the floor.” The newspaper reported the following fines from the police records:

The Standard, fourteen games $400
White House, six games $200
Horseshoe, eight games $250
Clancy House, five games $175
Union Club, five games $175

In January 1900, Seattle became the scene of what the Daily Times described as a “Gambler’s War.” Clancy House—not part of the original combine of the White House, the Standard and the Horseshoe—was shut down because John Clancy was running lotteries, one of the prohibited forms of gambling. Clancy had a beef: The other houses were running prohibited types of games, and therefore he should be allowed to run his lotteries. In reality, all gambling was illegal, but enforcement was selective. Determined to not let others have their cake, Clancy swore out complaints against the Standard and the Horseshoe. Indeed, those two houses were both shut down, according to the January 28 Seattle Post Intelligencer. It was expected that Earp and Urquhart’s Union Club would be next if the proprietors did not close of their own accord. The Post Intelligencer reported on February 1, 1900, that the Standard and Horseshoe had reopened. The same article indicated that evidence was being gathered to swear out warrants against Earp and Urquhart as well as the California Club run by David Argyle. No charges were filed against Earp and Urquhart in that particular round.

Court records show that city officials charged Urquhart, along with H.B. Kennedy, proprietor of the Horseshoe Club, with conducting gambling games on January 10, 1900, February 13, 1900, and March 12, 1900. This all occurred during the time when Wyatt Earp was Urquhart’s partner in the Union Club. For whatever reason, Urquhart was not charged in his business with Wyatt.

Apparently, Wyatt made a big enough splash in the community to be referenced in a Seattle Daily Times story of December 4, 1899, about the welterweight championship bout between Peter Jackson and Arthur Walker. The betting was heavy and many well-known sporting men were expected to be in attendance. Wyatt Earp was given top billing, followed by John Considine. Wyatt had not only waltzed into Seattle and opened a gambling house, apparently against Considine’s wishes, now he had seemingly bypassed Considine in local celebrity status.

As a resident of Seattle, Wyatt possibly had at least one acquaintance from his Tombstone days. George F. Spangenberg was in the cutlery business in Seattle in 1898 and lived there for many years. A George F. Spangenberg owned the gun shop in Tombstone where Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers were seen prior to the famous October 26, 1881, street fight near the O.K. Corral. Both the Arizona Spangenberg and the Seattle Spangenberg were born in New York City between 1855 and 1859. Arizona’s Spangenberg is known to have gone to Portland, Ore., in 1891, so it is possible he continued on to Seattle after that. Although Wyatt probably did not know it, he was acquainted with another Seattle resident, Annie Argyle, the wife of gambling club proprietor David Argyle. Annie had lived in Tombstone as the wife of Jack Crabtree, brother of Lotta the famous actress. Wyatt later testified in the Lotta Crabtree will case verifying his acquaintance with Jack and Annie and the birth of their child who was contesting Lotta’s will (see “Pioneers & Settlers” in the June 2007 issue of Wild West). Wyatt would have known Argyle but probably never met his wife. The sporting men generally kept their family life apart from business.

Prior to the local election in 1900, the Seattle Daily Times was very outspoken against Mayor Thomas D. Humes, who was running for reelection. It was on his watch that gambling was allowed to continue in Seattle, and a March 3, 1900, article in the Times let the public know that the gamblers had contributed $2,000 to Humes’ campaign. George Cotterill, a temperance leader, lost to Humes, but the days of open gambling were numbered, at least temporarily.

Rumors suggested that Humes had gained support and votes by promising his councilmen that he would clean up some of the vice in the tenderloin district. Shortly after the election, one of the councilmen declared that gambling in Seattle must end. In conjunction with that declaration, temperance leader J.L. Meade, with the support of the YMCA, filed complaints against the proprietors of the clubs. On March 23, 1900, the state of Washington filed charges in the Justice Court against the gamblers; among others, “Tom Urquhart and Dave Wyatt, [sic] Earp” were charged with “conducting as proprietor a certain gambling game.” Each gambling house was served separately. Warrants were issued, and Urquhart was served, but no mention is made in the court record of Wyatt being served. Urquhart appeared with his attorney William Parmelee (who represented one of the madams in another vice crackdown). After a couple of continuances, Urquhart, through his attorney, pleaded nolo contendere. Urquhart was fined $75.

All the furnishings were confiscated from the clubs that had been charged, and by order of the Superior Court, all the gaming paraphernalia was to be anted up for a large bonfire. Roulette wheels, green-clothed tables and the attending chairs were put to the torch, and a dark cloud of smoke—cheered by some, but not all residents—rose above the city. Wyatt’s investment in the tools of the trade and furnishings is unknown. By the time the charges were made in March 1900, Wyatt may have already left for San Francisco. In Seattle, officials were enforcing not only the gambling laws but also a law against prizefighting. There wasn’t much left for Wyatt in the Washington city. His livelihood had gone up in smoke, and his favorite sport had gone dark. Seattle couldn’t have been much fun anymore. In late April, the San Francisco Call reported Wyatt was involved in a bar fight in that California city, so it is known he went to San Francisco sometime after he left Seattle and before he returned to Alaska.

The crackdown on vice in Seattle was short lived. Gambling was thriving again by the end of April. Urquhart, Clancy and Argyle had all reopened. Apparently some of the roulette wheels had escaped the pious bonfire and were soon back in operation. As the records show, Considine, Argyle, Urquhart and others were in and out of court. They paid fines and dealt with the nuisance of clubs being closed and gambling paraphernalia confiscated. The lure of money kept them coming back court date after court date.

In the spring or summer of 1900, Wyatt Earp was back in Seattle with his wife, Sadie, to catch SS Alliance and return to his saloon in Alaska. Seattle was again a wide-open town with saloons, gambling, fast women, sporting events on which to bet and the camaraderie of the sporting crowd. Rules were made to be broken in Seattle, and the tenderloin was the place to break them. Wyatt Earp, though, was only a transient character in the tenderloin’s history. He entered the Seattle gambling fraternity with passion, fortitude and resilience, and he slid out with nary a whisper.

California resident Pam Potter is a descendant of Tom and Frank McLaury of Tombstone fame. Her primary sources were Seattle newspaper archives and city records; researcher Tom Gaumer assisted her. Suggested reading: Pioneer Square: Seattle’s Oldest Neighborhood (2005, Pioneer Square Community Association).


This article was written by Pam Potter and originally published in the October 2007 issue of Wild West Magazine. For more great articles, subscribe to Wild West magazine today!

Did Wyatt Earp carry a Buntline Special?

I've been watching the old western, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" on TV. There was recently an episode where Ned Buntline gave Wyatt the famous Buntline Special.  Did Wyatt really carry the pistol, and before receiving it did …

Interview With Author Ann KirschnerAccording to Ann Kirschner, the gunfight at the O.K. Corral was a love story, fought over Josephine Marcus, a woman of beauty and spunk barely out of her teens.
Lady at the O.K. Corral: The True Story of Josephine Marcus Earp, by Ann Kirschner“The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral was a love story, fought over Josephine Marcus, a woman of beauty and spunk barely out of her teens..." says author Ann Kuschner.
Wild West - June 2013 - Letters From ReadersIn the June issue of Wild West, readers share dispatches about the history of Wild West magazine, old-time baseball in Colorado, the dragoon period of the American West and prolific Western author James D. Horan.
Letter From Wild West - June 2013Our 25th Anniversary! Wild West has been informing and entertaining readers with true tales and images of the Old West since June 1988.
Daily Quiz for March 30, 2013"Nothing’s So Sacred As Honor And Nothing’s So Loyal As Love" is the epitaph on this man’s tombstone.
Wild West - April 2013 - Table of ContentsThe April 2013 issue of Wild West features stories about the hard life of a 19th-century cowpuncher, the rough-riding Georgian performers in Buffalo Bill's Wild West, to death of infamous Alaskan con man Soapy Smith, the natural history of the coyote, and the Indians-vs.-settlers Owens Valley (Calif.) War.
Interview With Editor-Author Roy YoungRoy Young is editor of the Wild West History Association Journal and researches the West, including the tales of three Stil(l)wells.
Wild West - April 2013 - Letters From ReadersIn the April issue of Wild West, readers share dispatches about Arizona Territory Sheriff Glenn Reynolds, as well as Wyatt Earp's gun-handling skills and the gun he used in that 1881 fight on Tombstone's Fremont Street.
Letter From Wild West - April 2013Con man Jefferson Randolph "Soapy" Smith II stirred up trouble on the frontier and still sparks controversy today.
Book Review: When Law Was in the Holster, by John BoesseneckerIn this well-researched, lively biography John Boessenecker gives oft-overlooked Western lawman Bob Paul his due.
American Experience: The Abolitionists"American Experience: The Abolitionists" is a compelling, 3-part series on the rise, fracturing, decline, resurgence and ultimate triumph of the movement to make all Americans free.
Wild West - December 2012 - Table of ContentsThe December 2012 issue of Wild West features stories about the frontier friendship of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, a run-in between the U.S. Cavalry and Texian raiders near the Santa Fe Trail, Sheriff Glenn Reynolds fatal encounter with the notorious Apache Kid, Wild Bill Hickok's fatal encounter with a pair of drunken 7th Cavalry troopers, and latter-day train robber Buffalo Tom Vernon.
Interview With Author-Comedienne Chris EnssProlific Western writer Chris Enss has delved into the lives of ordinary Westerners, though the extraordinary Custers have also drawn her interest.
DVD Review: Frontier Marshal, by 20th Century FoxIn this new release of the fanciful 1939 version of Frontier Marshal, Randolph Scott portrays Wyatt Earp, Cesar Romero his friend Doc "Halliday."
Letter From Wild West - December 2012Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday had a friendship as famed as their 1881 fight with the Cowboys in Tombstone.
Wild West - October 2012 - Table of ContentsThe October 2012 issue of Wild West features stories about the reluctant participants of that October 1881 gunfight in Tombstone, a fight between Winchester-toting Rangers and a band of surprised Comanches and Kiowas, the lynching of hired gun Jim Miller, tombstones of the Western and famous, and the struggle between Spain and Russia for the California coast.
DVD Review: Maverick, by Warner Home VideoMaverick will appeal to fans of classic TV shows, with its sharp, funny writing and unique twist on the code of the West.
Gunfight of the Sierra MadreAlready famous for his daring deeds in California and Arizona Territory, lawman Bob Paul outdid himself in Chihuahau, Mexico, in a showdown with a trio of desperate armed train robbers
DVD Review: Wyatt Earp’s RevengeDirector Michael Feifer had plenty of good material in the real-life killing of Dodge City prostitute Dora Hand, but he fails to deliver the goods in this straight-to-DVD film.
Book Review: Judge William H. Stilwell, by Roy B. YoungRoy Young highlights Arizona Territory Judge William H. Stilwell in this biography, the first volume of a trilogy about the Stilwell family in the Wild West.

2012 Spur Award Finalist: Walter Noble Burns - The Wild West’s Premier MythmakerWalter Noble Burns wrote a trilogy that made household names of Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp and Joaquín Murrieta. But the author’s own story is little known.
Wild West - April 2012 - Table of ContentsThe April 2012 issue of Wild West features stories about Lakota Sioux leader Red Cloud, California Ranger Harry Love and the grisly end of bandido Joaquin Murrieta, the 1874 locust plague on the Great Plains, the unusual early life of Bat Masterson's wife Emma, and shotgun messenger Clark Stocking.
Book Review: Wyatt Earp in San Diego, by Garner A. PalenskeGarner Palenske relates the little-known story of Wyatt and Josie Earp's post-Tombstone life in San Diego.
Interview With Author Johnny D. BoggsProlific writer Johnny D. Boggs excels at stories of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, the Civil War, baseball and Western films.
Keeping a Date with Chris NoelHow a million GIs in Vietnam seduced one Hollywood starlet who was talking to them over the airwaves
Wild West - February 2012 - Table of ContentsThe February 2012 issue of Wild West features stories about the Homestead Act of 1862, Prohibition cowboy Richard "Two-Gun" Hart, Arizona's and New Mexico's respective statehood centennials, the conflicting stories of a Fort Laramie hanging, and the Battle of the Hot Springs (Ark.) Gamblers.
TV Series Review: American ExperiencePBS' American Experience adds to its lineup of Western offerings with new episodes on Billy the Kid and Custer's Last Stand.
Interview With Author Lee SilvaCalifornia-based author Lee Silva has earned his reputation as a Western historian, Old West firearms expert and Wyatt Earp authority.
Wild West - December 2011 - Table of ContentsThe December 2011 issue of Wild West features stories about the iconic photo of the infamous Fort Worth Five, the aftermath of Lt. Col. George Custer's 1868 victory over Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle, Wounded Knee reporter Teresa Dean, the controversial 1886 death of black Mormon sheepherder Gobo Fango, and West Pointer turned white renegade Thomas Twiss.
Letter from Wild West - December 2011As valuable as our cover image of the Fort Worth Five may be, the only known tintype of Billy the Kid fetched $2.3 million at auction last summer.
Book Review: Captain John R. Hughes, by Chuck Parsons, and Rawhide Ranger, Ira Aten, by Bob AlexanderChuck Parsons' book Captain John R. Hughes and Bob Alexander's book Rawhide Ranger, Ira Aten pay tribute to two of the celebrated cadre of Texas Rangers who tamed the Old West.
Wild West - October 2011 - Table of ContentsThe October 2011 issue of Wild West features stories about the Cheyenne-crushing 1876 Battle of Red Fork, haunted hotels of the West, the legacy of Texas gunfighters, Western mythmaker Walter Noble Burns, and Phoenix marshal and Mexican-American advocate Enrique Garfias.
Tim Trask - Art of the WestSculptor Tim Trask gives Tombstone founder Ed Schieffelin another marker.
Interview With Author Jeff GuinnIn an early Christmas present for Earp enthusiasts, Santa Claus author Jeff Guinn tackles the O.K. Corral.
Letter from Wild West - October 2011Texas produced more than its fair share of Old West gunslingers.
The Gila Monster Had a Killer ReputationFacts and myths about the most notorious lizard ever to spread its venom in the Southwest.
Wild West - August 2011 - Letters from ReadersIn the August issue of Wild West, readers bend our ears about Curly Bill Brocius, the Alamo and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe.
Murder at the Palais RoyalCardsharp Frank Fossett found limitless gambling opportunities in Fort Worth, but a saloon fight with former employee Doc Carver cut short both men's long-range plans.
Baseball in the WestNew Yorker Alexander Cartwright brought the game to the frontier during the California Gold Rush, making it truly the national pastime.
Wild West - June 2011 - Letters from ReadersIn the June issue of Wild West, readers bend our about the Bozeman Trail, Southern Cheyenne Chief Wolf Robe, Boone May, Marcus Reno, the Top 10 list, Jesse James and Spotted Tail.
Daily Quiz for March 8, 2011Big Nose Kate (Mary Katherine Horony or Haroney) was the on-and-off companion of this Old West figure.

Daily Quiz for February 27, 2011Before changing his name and becoming an Old West sheriff, this man was a bank robber and cattle rustler.
Wild West - April 2011 - Letters from ReadersIn the April issue of Wild West, readers bend our collective ear about the Belknap Scandal, WWA's list of Top 100 Western Songs, Cheyenne Chief Roman Nose and Adolph Metzger's bugle from the site of the Fetterman Massacre.
'The Greely Expedition' - Duty, Honor and Arctic IceThis review of American Experience: The Greely Expedition praises the way filmmaker Rob Rapley subtly utilizes visuals and simple music to tell this story of a promising 19th-century scientific adventure that devolved into loss and despair
Dinosaur Wars in the American WestAmerican Experience - Dinosaur Wars examines the fight over fossils between Othniel Charles Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope in the American West.
American Experience: Robert E. Lee - ReviewAmerican Experience: Robert E. Lee provides a competent examination of the iconic commander, but stylistically the program doesn't live up to others in this excellent PBS series.
Wild West - February 2011 - Table of ContentsThe February 2011 issue of Wild West features stories about the 175th anniversary of the Battle of the Alamo (with an aerial photo-illustration of how the mission-turned-fort looked in March 1836), persisting myths about the Alamo, "Curly Bill" Brocius' pre-Tombstone brushes with the law, a Texas cattleman's tryst with a Comanche girl, and the hard last years of Calamity Jane.
Wild West - February 2011 - Letters from Readers

'The gunfight made Tombstone the major tourist and history buff destination it is today. Since it is the pivotal town attraction, why not render the site to be historically accurate?'

Benefit of the Doubt
I am always amazed by Earp …

Letter from Wild West - February 2011Few frontier women remain in Americans' memories these decades later, but Calamity was a hard-drinking, big-talking exception even in her day.
Letter from Wild West - October 2010Such famous (and infamous) brothers as the Earps, Mastersons, Chisums, Daltons, Youngers and Jameses made their mark on the Western frontier. Morgan Earp is the cover subject of the October Wild West.
Wild West - August 2010 - Table of ContentsThe August 2010 issue of Wild West features stories about Cheyenne warrior Roman Nose, Indian captive Cynthia Ann Parker and her Comanche husband Peta Nocona, bandido Tiburcio Vàsquez, frontier Fort Gibson and Wyatt Earp's turn in the ring as a boxing referee.
Wild West - August 2010 - Letters from Readers

'There's a very important element of classical drama involved with Wyatt that we don't have with Virgil—Wyatt's good guy/bad guy friendship with Doc Holliday'

Pony Express Rider
I just perused the April 2010 edition of your magazine. On P. 31 …

Wild West - June 2010 - Table of ContentsThe June 2010 issue of Wild West features stories about Little Bighorn scapegoat Captain Frederick Benteen, Chinese workers on the Central Pacific Railroad, William Crush's publicity-seeking train wreck, an 1861 shootout in Fort Worth and the Belknap Scandal.
Wild West - April 2010 - Letters from Readers

'I was rather shocked to read the interview with Boyer and not see a single mention of the fact that the University of Arizona Press dropped I Married Wyatt Earp from publication'

Walker Look-Alike
If you shaved off the beard, …

'American Experience' Explores Wyatt EarpThe life of controversial lawman Wyatt Earp is the subject of an episode of American Experience on PBS. This History Net article includes an interview with the show's writer, producer and director, Rob Rapley.
Interview with Author Wm. B. ShillingbergAfter tackling tough Tombstone in print, author Wm. B. Shillingberg gets the hell into Dodge.
Glenn Boyer Answers Six Questions About Wyatt EarpAuthor Glenn Boyer answers some of the oft-asked questions posed by Wyatt Earp fans.
Scott Dyke on Glenn Boyer and the Boyer CollectionScott Dyke, a former Wall Street broker, banker, businessman and investigator talks with Wild West magazine about the extensive Glenn Boyer collection relating to Wyatt Earp, his family and his contemporaries.
Wild West - December 2009 - Table of ContentsThe December 2009 issue of Wild West features stories about Tombstone lawman Virgil Earp, the 1841 fight between Texas Rangers and Comanches at Pinta Trail Crossing, the tragic killing of Dodge City doyenne Dora Hand, Cornelia Adair's rise to ranch baroness and a gruesome 1891 lynching in Bridgeport, Calif.
Letter from Wild West - December 2009Virgil Earp was the man with the star at O.K. Corral, but younger brother Wyatt stole his thunder in the history books.
The Killing of Dora HandIn October 1878, Texas cowboy Spike Kenedy went gunning for Dodge City Mayor Dog Kelley, his rival for the affections of stage performer Dora Hand. In a tragic twist of fate, Kenedy instead shot Hand, sparking a determined manhunt.
Not Married to Wyatt Earp - Glenn Boyer InterviewControversial writer Glenn Boyer talks to Wild West magazine about his career, his controversies and his main man - Wyatt Earp.

Wild West - October 2009 - Table of ContentsThe October 2009 issue of Wild West features stories about Teddy Roosevelt's Dakota days and the cowboys that rode in his inaugural parade three decades later, as well as classic Western quotes, poet bandit Red McNeil, Wyatt Earp biographer Glenn Boyer and massive Lewis freight wagons.
Interview with Author-Playwright Louis KraftAuthor/Playwright Louis Kraft turns his attention to Indian agent Ned Wynkoop, portraying him onstage.
Letters from Readers - October 2008 Wild WestReaders express their opinions on Bill Tilghman, what the "wild" in Wild West means, and Western movies from 1908's "A Bank Robbery" to 1976's Western comedy "Hawmps!"
Letters from Readers - August 2008 Wild WestReaders' comments on Wyatt Earp, Bill Tilghman, and camel drivers of the Old West.
Ellsworth: Ben and Billy Thompson's Cow Town

Noted gunfighter Ben Thompson and his younger brother Billy were among the Texans who had their hands full with the overzealous law enforcers in the Kansas community. By Richard H. Dillon

Newton, Wichita, Abilene and Dodge City were tough Kansas …

Letters From Readers - April 2008 - Wild West

KNOWING NOSES

In the December 2007 issue of Wild West Magazine, the article "Quanah Parker Man of Two Worlds," by Richard Selcer, has a quote on the top of age 31 to wit: "He had the high cheekbones of his …

John Flood and Wyatt Earp

Surely you've heard authors bemoan getting enough rejection slips from publishers to paper a room. But what if the author were the famed frontier lawman Wyatt Earp, and the man sending his book-length autobiography around was Western silent film idol …

Wyatt Earp in Seattle

Gambling was illegal in Seattle in 1899, but three gambling houses existed in a combine run by gambling kingpin John Considine. The established gamblers paid their fines to the city and county and were prepared to crush anyone who dared …

Dressed to Kill: The Guns Used by the Daltons at Coffeyville

The bungled double bank robbery attempt by the Dalton Gang in the brothers' old hometown of Coffeyville, Kansas, on October 5, 1892, left eight men dead and four wounded. The saga of that holdup attempt would have been Keystone Kops …

Letters from Readers -- April 2007 Wild West Magazine

IKE STORY LIKED
I am writing you after reading John Rose's excellent article "Twenty-Four Hours with Ike Clanton" in the October 2006 issue of Wild West Magazine. The article is one of the best simple synopses I've ever seen of …

Charlie Russell's Last LegacyBefore his heart gave out in 1926, famed Western artist Charles Marion Russell completed two incredible murals that provide a panoramic vision of the West.
Gunfight at the O.K. Corral: Did Tom McLaury Have a Gun

One of the most candidly understated descriptions of a funeral in the history of the Old West was written by Arizona historian Opie Rundle Burgess in her 1967 book Bisbee, Not So Long Ago, when she recorded her mother's …

Spitting Lead in Leadville: Doc Holliday's Last StandAlthough his glory years in Tombstone were behind him, down-on-his-luck Doc Holliday delivered a parting shot or two in Colorado.

By Roger Jay

O.K. Corral: A Gunfight Shrouded in Mystery

Cowboy Billy Clanton still lay dying, his face contorted with pain, when the press began the difficult task of piecing together the details of an October 1881 street battle in Tombstone, Arizona Territory. In later years it would become known …

Wyatt Earp's First StarYoung Wyatt Earp wears his badges well. Learn more about the photo's history and provenance.
Twenty-Four Hours With Ike Clanton

All-night card games were hardly unusual at the Occidental Saloon in Tombstone, Arizona Territory. But the game that broke up at 7 o'clock on the morning of October 26, 1881, was one the players would never forget — nor would …

Willie Kennard: Yankee Hill's Black MarshalThe unlikely tamer of Colorado's wild Yankee Hill was 42-year-old black marshal Willie Kennard.
Bat MastersonWhen the west wasn't so young, fearless Bat Masterson went to live and work in New York City.
Reign of the Rough-Scuff: Law and Lucre in WichitaWyatt Earp and other lawmen 'disciplined' the Texas drovers who sought entertainment at the end of the trail, and also fined those in the Kansas cow town who provided the entertainment.
Lawmen, Outlaws, and S.O.B.s: Gunfighters of the Old Southwest (Book Review)

Reviewed by Louis Hart
By Bob Alexander
High-Lonesome Books, Silver City, N.M., 2004

Although the title of his fourth book does not suggest it, Bob Alexander is not dealing here with the likes of Billy the Kid or Wyatt Earp. …

Murder in Tombstone: The Forgotten Trial of Wyatt Earp (Book Review)

Reviewed by Johnny D. Boggs
By Steven Lubet
Yale Univ. Press, New Haven, Conn., 2004

Is there anything left to say about the October 26, 1881, fight in which three Earp brothers and Doc Holliday killed Billy Clanton and brothers …

Gambling in the Old WestRecreation in the Old West oftentimes meant betting on the turn of a deck of cards. But for many colorful Westerners, gambling was a serious, sometimes deadly, business.
Faro: Favorite Gambling Game of the FrontierDid Hickok 'Buck the Tiger'? Did Holliday 'Twist the Tiger's Tail'? You bet. While the west was being won, many westerners were losing at Faro.
Picture of the Day: January 12


Wyatt Earp Dies
Frontiersman Wyatt Earp died on January 13, 1929, after an illustrious life in the West. Born in Illinois in 1848, he served as a lawman in Wichita and Dodge City, Kansas, as well as Tombstone, Arizona Territory, …

Gem Saloon ShootoutWilliam Rayner fashioned himself a Southern gentleman, but the citizens of El Paso usually gave him a wide berth. It took a stranger in town to cut him down to size.
The Dodge City WarWhen saloon owner Luke Short was told to get out of Dodge in 1883, he went. But he soon came back, and he was joined by the likes of Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson and Doc Holliday.
Warren Earp: The Little BrotherOvershadowed by his older brothers, Warren Earp struggled to live up to the Earp name.
The Gamblers' War in TombstoneBefore the bloody feud with the Cowboys reached a head, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and other 'Easterners' had to deal with the 'Slopers.'
Tombstone's Cemetery: BoothillThe old cemetery boasts graves of Clantons, McLaurys and other legendary Tombstone characters--not to mention some of the world's most famous (and funny) epitaphs.
Lawmen's Heated Gun Battle in Hot SpringsIn the popular Arkansas resort town, members of the police department and sheriff's office resorted to violence in March 1899 --against each other.
Wyatt Earp's Lost YearThe future lawman and O.K. Corral legend was seized in several 1872 police raids -- twice at brothels in Peoria, Ill., and once on a floating brothel downriver.
Hard Times Along the Chisholm TrailJesse Chisholm's trail led from Texas to Abilene, Kansas, and driving a herd of half-wild Longhorns over it was a baptism by fire.
Bat Masterson and the Sweetwater ShootoutBat Masterson's legend began at a backwater hamlet in the Texas panhandle when young Bat and a disgruntled 4th Cavalry soldier engaged in a deadly gunfight.
Doc HollidaySoutherner John Henry -- better known as Doc Holliday -- became a dentist, went West for his health and was soon transformed into a legendary killer...but just how deadly was he?
Frontier Lawman Virgil EarpVirgil Earp enforced the law before and after his famous stint as Tombstone's marshal.
Fort Worth's Wild White Elephant SaloonFor three decades, the Main Street establishment offered some of the finest gambling and food in the Wild West, as well as a few shootouts to remember.
Book Review: Westward Ho! ( MORT KÜNSTLER) : WW


MORT KÜNSTLER PORTRAYS HIS VISION OF THE OLD WEST IN HIS LATEST COLLECTION OF ARTWORK.

BY ANN THOMPSON

THE DRAMATIC EVENTS that shaped the Wild West–and the extraordinary cast of characters who populated it–have long inspired artists and authors to …

Book Review: The Illustrated Life & Times of Billy the Kid (Bob Boze Bell) : WW


The Illustrated Life & Times of Billy the Kid, by Bob Boze Bell, Tri Star­Boze Publications, Inc., Phoenix, 1996 (second edition), $39.95 hardbound, $29.95 softbound.

Since there is only one "known" photo of Billy the Kid, you can't very well …

Book Review: Lawmen of the Old West: The Good Guys (Peter Aleshire) : WW


Lawmen of the Old West: The Good Guys, by Del Cain, Republic of Texas Press, an imprint of Wordware Publishing, Plano, Texas, 2000, $16.95 paperback.

Author Del Cain makes a point of looking beyond such well-known lawmen as Wyatt Earp, …

Book Review: Lawman: The Life and Times of Harry Morse, 1835-1912 (by Allen Barra) : WW

'
Lawman: The Life and Times of Harry Morse, 1835-1912, by John Boessenecker, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1998, $29.95.

"Harry Morse was a gunfighter, manhunter, and sleuth whose career is without parallel in the history of the American frontier," …

Book Review: Jesse James (John Wukovits) : WW


Jesse Jamesby John Wukovits, Chelsea House Publishers (division of Main LineBook Co.), Philadelphia, Pa., 1997, $14.95.

Is there any reason why middle-school children shouldn't know something about Jesse James–the real Jesse James that is, not the Hollywood versions? After all, …

Book Review: By Grit & Grace, Eleven Women Who Shaped the American West (edited by Glenda Riley and Richard W. Etulain) : WW


By Grit & Grace, Eleven Women Who Shaped the American West, edited by Glenda Riley and Richard W. Etulain, Fulcrum Publishing, Golden, Colo., 1997, $22.95 paperback.

By Grit & Grace is the first offering in a new series called "Notable …

Book Review: With Badges & Bullets: Lawmen & Outlaws in the Old West (edited by Richard W. Etulain & Glenda Riley) : WW


With Badges & Bullets: Lawmen & Outlaws in the Old West, edited by Richard W. Etulain & Glenda Riley, Fulcrum Publishing, Golden, Colo., 1999, $17.95 paperback.

If you like to read about the big and often deadly personalities in the …

Book Review: Inventing Wyatt Earp: His Life and Many Legends (by Allen Barra) : WW

'
Inventing Wyatt Earp: His Life and Many Legends, by Allen Barra, Carroll & Graf, New York, 1998, $27.

On the heels of Casey Tefertiller's big (403 pages to be exact) 1997 biography Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend …

Book Review: Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend, 1850­1950 (Casey Tefertiller) : WW


Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend, by Casey Tefertiller, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1997, $30.

Western historians, especially the gunfighter specialists, all agree on these three things about Wyatt Earp–he was born in the usual way, …

Book Review: Apache Days & Tombstone Nights: John Clum's Autobiography 1877­1887 (edited by Neil B. Carmony) : WW


Apache Days & Tombstone Nights: John Clum's Autobiography 1877­1887, edited by Neil B. Carmony, Univ. of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1997, $12 paperback.

As the Indian agent at the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona for three years in the 1870s, …

Paid Advertisement
Paid Advertisement
History Net Daily Activities
History net Spacer
History net Spacer
Historynet Spacer
HISTORYNET READERS' POLL

Which of these wars resulted in the most surprising underdog upset?

View Results | See previous polls

Loading ... Loading ...
History net Spacer
STAY CONNECTED WITH US
RSS Feed Daily Email Update
History net Spacer History net Spacer
Paid Advertisement

Paid Advertisement
What is HistoryNet?

The HistoryNet.com is brought to you by Weider History, the world's largest publisher of history magazines. HistoryNet.com contains daily features, photo galleries and over 5,000 articles originally published in our various magazines.

If you are interested in a specific history subject, try searching our archives, you are bound to find something to pique your interest.

From Our Magazines
Weider History

Weider History Network:  HistoryNet | Armchair General | Achtung Panzer! | StreamHistory.com
Today in History | Ask Mr. History | Picture of the Day | Daily History Quiz | Contact Us

Copyright © 2014 Weider History. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.
Advertise With Us | Subscription Help | Privacy Policy