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Weapons Manual: Infographs by Max Gadney

By Max Gadney 
Originally published by World War II magazine. Published Online: June 26, 2007 
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"Weapons Manual", a featured department in World War II magazine, takes an in depth look at a different weapon used during the war.

From the February 2011 issue: The Decision to Drop the Bomb

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From the December 2010 issue: The Me 262 Jet Fighter

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From the October 2010 issue: The Mk2 Hand Grenade

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From the August 2010 issue: The M18 "Hellcat" Tank Destroyer

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From the June 2010 issue: German Night Fighter Tactics

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From the April 2010 Issue: American Aircraft Carriers in the Pacific War

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From the February 2010 Issue: The Makeshift MP3008

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From the November 2009 Issue: The Spitfire's Finest Hour

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From the September 2009 Issue: Flak Fills the Skies of Europe

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From the July 2009 Issue: The Glider – Silent Wings Over Normandy


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From the May 2009 Issue: The Browning Battlefield

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From the March 2009 Issue: An Undersea Killer Evolves

German naval mines. Click for larger image.
German naval mines. Click for larger image.

From the January 2009 Issue: The Norden Bombsight

The Norden bombsight. Click here for larger image.
The Norden bombsight. Click here for larger image.

From the November 2008 Issue: Fighter Planes Get Faster and Deadlier

 From the September 2008 Issue: The Fearsome, Flawed Tiger I

The Tiger I tank
The Tiger I tank

From the June 2008 Issue: V-3: The Vengeance Weapon

V3 The Vengeance Weapon
V3 The Vengeance Weapon

 

From the May 2008 Issue: Kamikazes, Deconstructed

From the March 2008 Issue: Battling Through the Bocage.

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From the January/February 2008 Issue: Which Tank Was Tops?

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From the December 2007 Issue: Radar Rules the Waves

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From the November 2007 Issue: Assault Rifle – Theory to Practice

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From the October 2007 Issue: Delivering Flames and Fear

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From the July/August 2007 Issue: Birth of the Bazooka

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For more information on Max Gadney, visit www.maxgadney.com. For more great features, subscribe to World War II magazine today!


8 Responses to “Weapons Manual: Infographs by Max Gadney”


  1. 1
    Levi says:

    I like what you guys do , this is good for history projects.

  2. 2
    giancarlo says:

    Where are the italian planes? terrificant Macchi 205 every american p38 or p51 escapes every time see an Macchi 205. WHY?
    WHY you don't speak of MAcchi 205? Nazi's think to transport the lines of production in Germany because was SUPERIOR spitfire, p51 p38 and mosquitos.
    Allied escapes every time see Macchi 205 and Fiat G55

  3. 3
    giancarlo says:

    excuse me for the little english language

  4. 4
    acid says:

    becouse there was only 105 G.55 Producted and MC 205 shooted down many p 40 but by allies (Fuerza Aerea Italiana Cobeligerante? if im correct) used them only for recon.

  5. 5
    JBone says:

    It is well known that the Japanese made the request for surrender under the condition that their emperor (who they viewed as almost a deity) would not be subject to war crimes or be punished in any way. All of the higher ups in the U.S. pacific command believed the japanese would surrender within 6 weeks when asked about the possibility of nuclear bombs. The Japanese fleet at this point had pretty much been completely eradicated, firebombs were dumped on all major cities with little to no resistance. Sure, we had nuclear weapons and it would have been political suicide if Truman wouldn't have used this technology, but don't be narrow minded so much to believe dropping the bombs had nothing to do with showing the Russians, using the bombs simply because we spent billions developing them, or political necessity. It wasn't ever simply use the bombs or 1,000,000 Americans die. (BTW the same terms of surrender the Japanese were willing to take before the 2 bombs were dropped were agreed by MacArthur after they were dropped)

    The Japanese were guilty of war crimes as well, but if we were to have lost… even McNamara agrees most U.S. commanders in the pacific would have been guilty as war criminals.

  6. 6
    RAH says:

    There was no such request for surrenduer made by the Japanese. This is a piece of academic disinformation started by egg heads that objected to the use of the bombs. Their meetings with the then neutral Soviets were aimed at gaining a limited armistisce leaving not only the emporer in place but also the military leadership/government that actually ran Japan and took the country to war with imperial designs in the first place. They proposed that the Soviets then ally with them and after Japan's Navy was rebuilt and the two would share the bounty of China. If, as you and others claim, Truman wanted to make a point to the Soviets, then why did he give them free reign in Eastern Europe at Pottsdam jsut weeks before the bombs were dropped?

  7. 7

    [...] Grab em before they disappear! [...]

  8. 8


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