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William T. Sherman

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    ‘Terrible Has Been the Storm’

    William T. Sherman’s own soldiers were shocked by the destruction they left behind in South Carolina. On December 22, 1864, William T. Sherman offered Abraham Lincoln a special Christmas gift, namely the city of Savannah. General Sherman...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Demon of the Lost Cause

    Demon of the Lost Cause: Sherman and Civil War History Wesley Moody; University of Missouri Press In this latest entry in the University of Missouri Press’ “Shades of Blue and Gray” series, Wesley Moody explores the myths that still...

  • MHQ Magazine

    William T. Sherman Joins the Navy

    Throughout the American Civil War, both sides understood the importance of railroads and rivers, the two primary means of moving goods and people across vast distances. In A Blaze of Glory, the first volume in Jeff Shaara’s Civil War...

  • CIVIL WAR TIMES MAGAZINE

    The War In Their Words: “On Account of a Bug”

    Multi-legged dangers lurked in camp and field ivil War soldiers expected to duck bullets and bomb bursts. But Ohioan William W. Richardson discovered that a simple crawling creature could also lay a fighting man low, and even cause a...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Slavery, sex and sin

    On January 3, 1865, a little more than a month after Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman’s troops destroyed her plantation in Burke County, Ga., Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas sat down at her desk in Augusta and transcribed into her diary an...

  • CIVIL WAR TIMES MAGAZINE

    The War’s Biggest Blunder

    William T. Sherman had many opportunities to capture Augusta’s ordnance complex And didn’t even try In the June issue, we published Part 1 of author Ted Savas’ account of Georgia’s Augusta Arsenal in which he described the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: Forty Acres and a Mule

    The Inside Story of Sherman’s Special Field Orders, No. 15. Most Americans have heard the phrase “40 acres and a mule.” Few, however, know it originated in a directive known as Special Field Orders, No. 15 (SFO 15), issued by Union...

  • AMERICA'S CIVIL WAR MAGAZINE

    Signals Crossed

    Communication Failures Cost Forrest and the Rebels Dearly at Tupelo he summer of 1864 was in many ways the Confederacy’s last gasp for survival. Ulysses S. Grant had gone east to take overall command of the Union Army, but he left his...