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  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: John B. Armstrong

    John B. Armstrong: Texas Ranger and Pioneer Ranchman by Chuck Parsons, Texas A&M University Press, College Station, 2007, $20. This slim book on Texas Ranger John B. Armstrong surveys the life of the lawman most famous for arresting...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ronald Burgess Honors Quanah

    Comanche artist works in black and white. The Indian’s face is lined with battle scars, long braids wrapped in skins, narrow eyes staring into your soul, a diamond and pearl pin at his neck. It’s a perfect picture of the last chief of...

  • Wild West Magazine

    University of Arizona Holds Special Status

    The University of Arizona is a fine modern institution with terrific collections of Western materials, but in the beginning, Tucson wasn’t exactly jumping for joy at the prospect of getting the school. What do we want with a university?...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Christmas Frontier-Style

    Yes, Virginia City, there is a Santa Claus. On Christmas Day 1863 in Virginia City, Nevada, Mark Twain received a gift from a Miss Chase. “The diabolical box had nothing in it but a ghastly, naked, porcelain doll baby,” newspaperman...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Plenty Horses’ Vengeance

    The young Brulé Sioux, wanting to avenge the one-sided fight at Wounded Knee, shot down a veteran lieutenant. The U.S. Army touted the December 29, 1890, bloody incident on South Dakota’s Wounded Knee Creek as a battle of such magnitude...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Quanah Parker: Man of Two Worlds

    Half-white but raised a Comanche, he led the ‘Lords of the Plains’ in times of war and peace and knew enough about the white man’s world to become a successful cattleman. In the heart of the Stockyards Historic District of Fort Worth...

  • Wild West Magazine

    John Grass Stood Tall at Standing Rock as a Farmer, Judge, Leader

    The cooperative Blackfoot Lakota became a culture broker. John Grass, a major Blackfoot Lakota leader, is often overlooked because his reputation was not based primarily upon his exploits as a warrior. Rather, it was his outstanding...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Newlywed Maggie Graham Met Sudden Disaster in the Desert

    Apaches ambushed her in Texas’ Bass Canyon. The wedding held on September 16, 1879, in Frio Town, Texas, was a well-attended, luxurious affair. The guests packed the second story of the courthouse, where the reception was held. Long...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Guns Were Sometimes in Christmas Stories

    The sharing of six-shooters was no holiday. The Christmas season, at least a modern-day Christmas, is largely secularized and dominated by gifts and decorated fir trees. On the frontier in the 19th century, most missionaries and settlers...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Interview: Jerry Keenan Keen on Luther Kelly

    The scout was in the hopper for 40 years. Research can sometimes become a quagmire, as any historical writer will tell you. In the first place you may not be able to devote as much time to a project as you would like;in the second,you may...

  • American History Magazine

    Whacking Hitler

    In 1933 the FBI was on the hunt for a would-be assassin reputed to have ties to the country’s most notorious criminals.The objective: to take out the Nazi chancellor of Germany. Dutch said the contract was simple. And Dutch, I...

  • American History Magazine

    Power and Vitality: Margaret Bourke-White

    On the evening of October 29, 1929, a 25-year-old photographer entered the First National Bank of Boston hoping the building would be empty, so she could finish shooting pictures of its new lobby for an advertisement. Instead, she found...

  • American History Magazine

    King’s Last Crusade

    Martin Luther King went to Memphis in March 1968 to lead a peaceful demonstration in support of civil rights and economic justice. Instead, the city became his final battleground. Sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee, had been on...

  • American History Magazine

    A Day to Remember: January 25, 1787- Shays’ Rebellion Gets Bloody

    The United States was not kind to the Revolutionary War veterans who had created the new nation. Demobilized troops of the Continental Army received little, if any, back pay due to them. What payment they did collect was typically made in...

  • American History Magazine

    The Battle to Save Blair Mountain

    More than 85 years after the miners’ ill-fated march, another battle for Blair Mountain is being waged in the courts. Over the years, the miners’ battlefield disappeared piece by piece as coal companies mined the mountain. The mining...

  • American History Magazine

    A Powder Keg Ready to Blow

    Coal miners toiling in the bowels of the earth kept American industry humming in the early 1900s. Their fight for better working and living conditions led to the nation’s largest armed uprising since the Civil War. It was a tableau that...