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  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- December 2010

    Readers Point to the War’s Decisive Moments More than 100 readers responded to our article “What Was the Turning Point of World War II?” in the July/August issue, submitting their own turning points by mail and joining the debate at...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Play It Again, Putzi

    A piano-playing Nazi official charmed Hitler, then betrayed him to the United States. During the height of World War II, a longtime intimate of Adolf Hitler lived as a pampered prisoner on a Virginia plantation eight miles from the White...

  • World War II Magazine

    Terror and Survival at Tarawa

    The returning amtrac churned toward the safety of the invasion fleet at Tarawa. A Japanese shell splashed close behind. A second exploded to the right. Then came the third...

  • Military History Magazine

    Father of the Navy

    John Barry fought for his adoptive country at sea and presided at the birth of the U.S. Navy Royal Navy Lieutenant Richard Boger was vexed. The commander of the eight-gun sloop tender HMS Edward had been chasing an unidentified merchantman...

  • Military History Quarterly Magazine

    Why We Won’t Give Up Torture

    Some 150 years ago, Western armies all but abandoned torture. It has returned with a vengeance. In 1849, pacifists felt history was on their side. A series of idealistic revolutions had shaken autocratic regimes across Europe the previous...

  • World War II Magazine

    Fire for Effect: Invisible Man Simpson

    Skillful, reliable, and able to handle any mission, a guy named Bill Simpson managed to be one of the greatest generals all while avoiding the spotlight. ...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Still Desperately Seeking Sean

    Four decades later, iconoclastic photographer Tim Page and the U.S. military find themselves playing the same tune in the search for remains of Sean Flynn. The freelance war photographer who uncompromisingly documented the bloody grind of...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The ‘Suicide’ Mission That Wasn’t

    U.S. Embassy attackers reemerge from the fog. The 1968 Tet attack on the U.S. Embassy was one Vietnam War news story that the international press didn’t have to commute to aboard C-130s or be ferried in on helicopters to cover; it...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Letter from Vietnam- February 2011

    Peering through the fog Some of the most widely reported and well-known events in history are often, at the same time, among the most misunderstood or are saddled with “official” records forever factually flawed. The Tet Offensive that...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- February 2011

    LBJ’s White House Daily Diary Goes Digital FOR HISTORIANS AND researchers, and those just curious about the inner workings of the White House, more than 14,000 pages from President Lyndon B. Johnson’s “Daily Diary” are now posted...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Lawrence Sperry: Genius on Autopilot

    Lawrence Sperry, the maverick inventor who created the autopilot, had 23 patents to his name related to aircraft safety when he ran out of luck over the English Channel....

  • Vietnam Magazine

    An Angel in Dien Bien Phu’s Hell

    On a mission to evacuate wounded, a young flight nurse finds herself trapped, as the Viet Minh close in to capture the last French outpost. Born into a storied family, Geneviève de Galard was shaped by its patriotic spirit and even as a...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    One Wild Ride to Destiny

    A Marine helicopter pilot reveals new insights into the legendary 1965 mission chronicled in Life by photographer Larry Burrows. It was a clear, sunny Wednesday in the scenic Que Son Valley, southwest of Da Nang, the last day of March...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Garcia’s Cadillacs

    Although he stood less than 5 feet tall, Marine Salvador Garcia was a giant. There is a special place in my heart for Salvador Garcia. His curious eyes and humble expression opened onto a soul that was modest and accepting, but he was a...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A U.S. Traitor’s Odd Twist of Fate

    How an American deserter’s murder may lead to war crimes convictions for former Khmer Rouge leaders. Michael Nolan will not give up the ghost. In 2008 and 2009, he spent many agonizing weeks in Vietnam and Cambodia with a film crew and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- June 2011

    Vang Pao Gets Hero’s Farewell, But Not at Arlington THE DEEPLY REVERED former General Vang Pao of the Royal Army of Laos, who led thousands of Hmong guerrillas in a CIA-backed secret army during the Vietnam War, died in California at the...