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Military Technology

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Japanese Type 97 Chi-Ha Tank

    The Type 97 was Japan’s standard medium tank during World War II. It first saw action against Russian forces at Nomonhan in 1939, and continued service throughout the war. When the Type 97 found itself outclassed by Allied tanks later in...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Review: Britain’s Spitfire Mk. IXC

    The German Fw 190 asserted its authority as soon as it appeared over the English Channel in September 1941. It was so clearly superior to the Spitfire Mk. V that RAF Fighter Command curtailed operations due to unacceptably high losses. As...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Everyman’s Gun- The AK-47

    How Cold War politics made the AK-47 the world’s most ubiquitous gun. Plus—Fidel, Saddam, and the history of automatic weapons. One weapon alone has been a consistent presence in modern war: the infantry rifle. Tanks can rout...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Underwater Terror

    The plucky Bushnell brothers invented the military submarine, frightened the mighty British fleet, and gave George Washington a bit of hope. LEONARDO da Vinci, a great dabbler in military machines, once sketched designs for a crude subma-...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Navy’s big, green monster

    The first U.S. submarine targeted wretched Rebel ironclads. In 1869, Jules Verne wrote Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, a novel about circumnavigating the  globe underwater, in which he introduced readers to Captain Nemo’s...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Confederate Invention

    Confederate Invention: The Story of the Confederate States Patent Office and Its Inventors H. Jackson Knight; LSU Press Registered patent agent H. Jackson Knight stumbled across the Confederate States Patent Office’s annual summary...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Simple. Cheap. Deadly.

    Nasty little coal bombs. In January 1864, Confederate President Jefferson Davis sat at his desk in the Richmond White House, admiring a new secret weapon. What resembled nothing more than a lump of coal was in fact a miniature torpedo, or...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Review: BMW R75 Motorcycle

    German BMW R75 Motorcycle In 1916, two premier German aircraft companies merged to become Bavarian Motor Works, or BMW. Their logo symbolized a white airplane propeller against a blue sky. But the company would soon be grounded by the 1919...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Clearing the Fog of War

    In the late 1800s, countries raced to make smokeless gunpowder. The result changed the face of battle. The story of smokeless gunpowder begins in Switzerland, in the impeccable kitchen of Frau Schönbein. One fateful day in 1845, her...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Uncle Sam’s Flying Fire Trucks

    U.S. Forest Service adaptations of helicopters to fight raging forest fires in 1967 proved to be highly effective in Vietnam. “Here come the flying fire trucks!”shouted the heat-blasted engineer sergeant, rallying his weary firefighter...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letter from the Editor- August 2012

    Discoveries and Rediscoveries When U.S. military leaders in Vietnam decided late in 1966 to launch Operation Cedar Falls, the biggest operation of the war to date, their goal was to clear an area not far from Saigon that was under Viet...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Confederate Coal Torpedo

    Confederate Coal Torpedo: Thomas Courtenay’s Infernal Sabotage Weapon Joseph M. and Thomas H. Thatcher; Kenerly Press Books have been devoted to ironclads, observation balloons, rifled artillery, repeating rifles and the Gatling gun, but...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The ’61 Springfield Rifle Musket

    Strong right arm of the infantry. Federal infantrymen were armed mainly with the Springfield rifle musket, Model 1861, or variants of this model, i.e., the Model 1863 or 1864 rifle musket. If you have a “Civil War musket” in your...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Logs to Mortars- Natural Killers

    Union troops at Vicksburg were so desperate for siege weapons they made logs into mortars. During the early phases of the Vicksburg Campaign, General Ulysses S. Grant tried using both direct assault and maneuver to dislodge Confederate...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Kit: German Rail Car G10

    Rail cars were indispensable to the German army when used for moving military troops and supplies— and, of course, moving souls to concentration camps. But despite the historical importance of military rail transport, until now there has...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Review: Bishop 25 Pounder Self-Propelled Artillery

    When the British Army faced off against the Germans in North Africa’s western desert, they were very much surprised and impressed by the enemy’s use of mobile artillery. Desperate to keep up, the British looked for a fix to their...