Military Technology Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Military Technology

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Clyde Built

    Clyde Built: Blockade Runners, Cruisers and Armoured Rams of the American Civil War by Eric J. Graham, Birlinn Press, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2006, 238 pages, $34.95. Eric J. Graham’s Clyde Built provides a unique Scottish perspective on...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Behind the Horsepower of Civil War Armies

    Despite the available technology of roads and steamships, Civil War armies were supplied much like the Roman armies had been. North and South still relied on the simple strength of wagons, the brawn of mules, horses and oxen, and the skill...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Behind the Steam Power of Civil War Armies

    I am willing to do all that I can do,” Confederate railroad man F. W. Sims wrote in February 1862, “but to improve transportation without men and materials is the requisition of the Egyptian taskmaster. Give me the men and you shall...

  • World War II Magazine

    An American Bomber for Moscow

    When the Soviets asked the United States for advanced B-17 and B-24 bombers in 1941, what they got instead were workhorse Douglas A-20s. During the cataclysmic initial phase of Operation Barbarossa that began on June 22, 1941, the Ger-...

  • World War II Magazine

    Some Assembly Required

    The men of the 148th Motor Vehicle Assembly Company put together the dependable ‘deuce and a halfs’ that carried the Allies to victory. Whenever I watch movies about the Normandy invasion, I find that I am bothered by a detail that...

  • World War II Magazine

    Japan’s ‘Suicide Gun’

    The Nambu Type 94 Shiki Kenju 8mm pistol was the worst military small arm of World War II. There are many contenders for the honor of World War II’s best infantry weapon. Nazi Germany had the fearsome MG42 light machine gun, capable of...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Quickly Improvised Panzer Killer

    The M-3 Gun Motor Carriage served the U.S. Army’s tank destroyer force temporarily but well. With war looming in Europe in the late 1930s, the United States began the long, slow process of rearming its military, hoping to achieve field...

  • World War II Magazine

    Poetry in Motion on the High Seas

    Japan’s Fubuki-class destroyers could take on virtually anything afloat. The Japanese named all their destroyers after elemental and weather conditions, but they had particular reason to wax poetic with the “special class” they...

  • World War II Magazine

    Einstein and the Bomb

    The scientist who unlocked the secrets of the atom warned FDR about the Nazis’ nuclear ambitions and then watched in horror from the sidelines as the U.S. let the genie out of the bottle. Albert Einstein spent the summer of 1939 in a...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Homemade Aussie Submachine Gun

    The unconventional Owen stood up well to the hard conditions of jungle fighting. Army ordnance officers at the Victoria Barracks in Sydney politely showed 24-year-old inventor Evelyn Owen the door in July 1939 when he came calling with the...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Young Physicist Who Blunted the Blitz

    Like many a scientist on the eve of World War II, R. V. Jones wondered if he had made a terrible blunder by offering his brains rather than his brawn to his country. For every Ph.D. lucky enough to be assigned a truly war winning...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man on the Trail of the Nazi A-bomb

    The first five Allied vehicles to enter Paris on its day of liberation from Nazi occupation on August 25, 1944, were tanks of the Free French forces. The sixth was an American jeep. Dodging sniper fire, it cut through back streets and...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Gritty City That Armed America

    Decades ago, when I sailed my small sloop from Richmond, California, into San Francisco Bay, I passed ghostly artifacts of America’s monumental World War II industrial effort. Disused dry docks, rusting cranes, and abandoned buildings...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Jet Race and the Second World War

    The Jet Race and the Second World War By Sterling Michael Pavelec. 248 pp. Praeger Security International, 2007. $49.95. The first true jet vs. jet air war took place over Korea, but jet-propelled aircraft debuted during World War II. The...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Town that Gave Birth to the Bomb

    Los Alamos is misleading. Most New Mexico towns, with their quaint adobe walls, emanate a sense of the past. But Los Alamos on first inspection lacks any feeling of real history. You drive up through some magnificent country into this town...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Ultimate Weapon

    Precision-guided munitions have changed the modern battlefield, and in the process created a new American way of war. On March 30, 1972, as American troop strength in Vietnam fell to a seven-year low—well below the hundred-thousand...