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Military Technology

  • Military History Magazine

    The Biggest Gun in the World

    In 1918 the Germans hit Paris from 68 miles away with 330-pound artillery shells fired by a mysterious gargantuan cannon. At 7:15 am on March 23, 1918, Parisians near Number 6 Quai de Seine, in the northeastern part of the city, were...

  • Military History Magazine

    Dark Past, Bright Lights

    How the U.S. got Nazi Germany’s best scientists. World War II was as good as over in Europe and the rubble of Berlin and Dresden was still smoking as American, Soviet and British armies ransacked war-ravaged Ger- many. The Allied race...

  • Military History Magazine

    Weaponry: The Springfield Trapdoor rifle

    Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Roosevelt found himself in a tight spot on the outskirts of Santiago, Cuba, on July 1, 1898. He had just led his Rough Riders in an attack up a winding muddy road from the beach. At a curve in the road he found...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: AK-47

    AK-47: The Weapon That Changed the Face of War by Larry Kahaner, Wiley, Hoboken, N.J., 2006, $25.95. On January 4, 2002, a 31- year-old Green Beret was killed during an ambush in Afghanistan’s Paktria province. Nathan Chapman was the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Voice: Dreams of Dominance Collide With Reality

    In the wake of the Cold War, a quartet of ideas emerged that seemed to define the future of international politics. The first of these ideas was Francis Fukuyama’s argument that history had “ended” with the victory of liberal...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Letters from Readers- April 2007

    Defending S.L.A. Marshall Robert L. Bateman’s “Personality” article on S.L.A. Marshall in the January/February issue is dismaying for a number of reasons. The author’s over-the-top vitriol toward Marshall is disturbing and mars the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Interview with Ronald Arkin: Building Trust in Combat Robots

    In 1958, shortly after the Soviet launch of Sputnik, the Department of Defense created the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop and apply cutting-edge advances in military technology. Stemming from DARPA’s...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Colt Also Offered Revolving Rifles

    Long guns upstaged by Colt revolvers. When Samuel Colt patented the first practical revolving pistol design early in 1836, he kindled the torch of legend for what became one of the most famous firearms in Western history. The Paterson Colt...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Clyde Built

    Clyde Built: Blockade Runners, Cruisers and Armoured Rams of the American Civil War by Eric J. Graham, Birlinn Press, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2006, 238 pages, $34.95. Eric J. Graham’s Clyde Built provides a unique Scottish perspective on...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Behind the Horsepower of Civil War Armies

    Despite the available technology of roads and steamships, Civil War armies were supplied much like the Roman armies had been. North and South still relied on the simple strength of wagons, the brawn of mules, horses and oxen, and the skill...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Behind the Steam Power of Civil War Armies

    I am willing to do all that I can do,” Confederate railroad man F. W. Sims wrote in February 1862, “but to improve transportation without men and materials is the requisition of the Egyptian taskmaster. Give me the men and you shall...

  • World War II Magazine

    An American Bomber for Moscow

    When the Soviets asked the United States for advanced B-17 and B-24 bombers in 1941, what they got instead were workhorse Douglas A-20s. During the cataclysmic initial phase of Operation Barbarossa that began on June 22, 1941, the Ger-...

  • World War II Magazine

    Some Assembly Required

    The men of the 148th Motor Vehicle Assembly Company put together the dependable ‘deuce and a halfs’ that carried the Allies to victory. Whenever I watch movies about the Normandy invasion, I find that I am bothered by a detail that...

  • World War II Magazine

    Japan’s ‘Suicide Gun’

    The Nambu Type 94 Shiki Kenju 8mm pistol was the worst military small arm of World War II. There are many contenders for the honor of World War II’s best infantry weapon. Nazi Germany had the fearsome MG42 light machine gun, capable of...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Quickly Improvised Panzer Killer

    The M-3 Gun Motor Carriage served the U.S. Army’s tank destroyer force temporarily but well. With war looming in Europe in the late 1930s, the United States began the long, slow process of rearming its military, hoping to achieve field...

  • World War II Magazine

    Poetry in Motion on the High Seas

    Japan’s Fubuki-class destroyers could take on virtually anything afloat. The Japanese named all their destroyers after elemental and weather conditions, but they had particular reason to wax poetic with the “special class” they...