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Aviation

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shear Terror

    Thunderstorm-generated wind shear was poorly understood until three major airline accidents compelled meteorologists and aviation experts to find solutions to the problem   On June 24, 1975, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Clash of Titans Over Korea

    On April 12, 1953, two aerial champions dueled at 40,000 feet over North Korea: MiG-15 ace Semyon Fedorets and F-86 Sabre ace Joe McConnell. In recent years, Russia has confirmed a fact long suspected by United Nations airmen: Soviet...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Punching Out: Evolution of the Ejection Seat

    The faster airplanes go, the faster we need to get out of them. If necessity is the mother of invention, combat is its father. Little more than a month after Pearl Harbor, when the United States was belatedly gearing up for war,...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Eye in the Sky: 5 Questions with James Green

    As NASA’s chief scientist, James Green studies outer space, but in his downtime he studies the distant-in-time realm of Thaddeus Lowe’s Union Army Balloon Corps. Green became intrigued with the corps after immersing himself in his...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    One-Oh-Wonder, the F-101 Voodoo

    Conceived as a fighter escort for SAC nuclear bombers, then adapted to other roles, McDonnell’s 1,000-mph F-101 Voodoo made its mark operationally as a photoreconnaissance platform and fighter-interceptor. As Lieutenant Colonel James R....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Origins of Topgun

    The Navy Fighter Weapons School, the official name for Topgun, was created in response to the poor performance of U.S. Navy fighters and their missiles in the first few years of the air war over North Vietnam. When the Navy compared its...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Small Planes, Big Thrills: The Mighty Midgets

    Born with the homebuilt lightplane movement in the 1920s, the “Builder’s Class” of Formula One racers continues to thrill spectators today at Reno. The annual Reno Air Races usually evoke images of the Unlimited class: highly...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Top Gun From Down Under

    Flying mainly over North Africa and in defense of his home island, Australian ace of aces Clive Caldwell shot down a mixed bag of Axis airmen, including Germans, Italians and Japanese. As with other members of the Commonwealth, Australia...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Passion and the Fury: Mick Mannock

    Edward “Mick” Mannock, the Irish-born RAF ace of World War I, proved he was a man of extraordinary gifts with his leadership and combat skills....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Homebuilt Macchi M.5 Replica

    When I first read that a Holland, Mich., aviation enthusiast and former pilot had built a Macchi M.5 “fighter plane,” I put that description down to a newspaper columnist’s overheated and underinformed enthusiasm. After all, the 1917...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Barling Bomber

    Cost overruns and poor performance doomed the experimental strategic bomber, but it helped point the way to the future. To some it was the “Magnificent Leviathan,” to others “Mitchell’s Folly.” Its detractors considered the giant...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Valor | Mike Novosel

    Bomber-turned-medevac pilot saved more than 5,000 lives...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    When Birds Strike

    Since the earliest days of manned flight, pilots have sought to safely share the skies with their avian counterparts—with mixed results. On September 7, 1905, less than two years after Orville Wright became the first man to make a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Surrounded and Outnumbered

    Against seemingly overwhelming odds, the diminutive Fourteenth Air Force held the line against the Japanese in China during World War II. After almost six months of continuous combat duty in China with the Fourteenth Air Force, Sergeant...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bolo

    When the Douglas B-18 bomber joined ASW patrols, an old dog learned a new trick. On August 22, 1942, Oberleutnant-zur-See Ludwig Forster was enjoying a brief respite from torpedoing Allied merchant ships in the Caribbean Sea when...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Roadable Airplane

    The Gwinn Aircar came tantalizingly close to fulfilling the dream of a roadable airplane. A safe airplane as easy to operate and as cheap to buy as the average automobile. This was the American dream in the air-minded 1930s. I lived...