Art Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Art

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Review: Symbols of Power

    “Symbols of Power: Napoléon and the Art of the Empire Style, 1800–1815” October 21, 2007–January 27, 2008 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston In 1804 members of Napoléon’s state council convened to prepare for his coronation and to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    We Guide to Strike

    Gil Cohen’s ASAA “Award of Distinction” tribute to British Pathfinders. Gil Cohen’s painting We Guide to Strike is an example of his ability to offer insight into the emotions and character of his subjects while utilizing their...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Eyes of the Fleet

    David Quinlan pays tribute to his Pearl Harbor veteran father. Right before 0800 hours on December 7, 1941, Boatswains Mate John J. Quinlan had just finished putting on his uniform before attending Sunday Mass when he heard explosions and...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Andy Thomas Captures Osages in War Paint

    He also painted Hickok vs. Tutt. On a Missouri hill in the early 1800s, a party of tall Osage Indians—in full war paint, their heads shaved except for roach clips, some brandishing muskets they have acquired from the French—appear...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ronald Burgess Honors Quanah

    Comanche artist works in black and white. The Indian’s face is lined with battle scars, long braids wrapped in skins, narrow eyes staring into your soul, a diamond and pearl pin at his neck. It’s a perfect picture of the last chief of...

  • American History Magazine

    Power and Vitality: Margaret Bourke-White

    On the evening of October 29, 1929, a 25-year-old photographer entered the First National Bank of Boston hoping the building would be empty, so she could finish shooting pictures of its new lobby for an advertisement. Instead, she found...

  • American History Magazine

    Lincoln’s Teenage Sculptor

    It was a confident 17-year-old art student named Vinnie Ream who boldly requested that the president of the United States pose for her while she honed her craft. Abraham Lincoln allowed the teenager 15 minutes per day to observe and sculpt...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Headlines- December 2007

    Gettysburg Cyclorama Comes Back to Life Out of public view since 2005, Gettysburg’s famed cyclorama painting, The Battle of Gettysburg, has been restored to its former full-color glory. The first of 14 panels, measuring 26 feet wide by...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Work in Progress

    How do you restore the endangered Gettysburg Cyclorama painting—all three tons and 14,600 square feet of it? Very carefully. “Whilst in Chicago I went to see the battle of Gettysburg three times, and you may rest assured you have got a...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Sculpting the Cause

    Fighting for VMI and the Confederacy forever changed Moses Ezekiel’s life, and his artwork celebrated and honored that experience. June 4, 1914, was a typical hot, humid late-spring day in the nation’s capital, but it would have taken...

  • World War II Magazine

    Saving Private Rembrandt

    GIs known as the Monuments Men went underground to rescue art masterpieces plundered by the Nazis. Private Harry L. Ettlinger celebrated his 19th birthday on January 28, 1945, by boarding a truck in the bitter cold at a camp on the border...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Showing Too Much of the Horrors of War

    Frank Brangwyn’s realistic portrayals of combat shocked Great Britain’s War Department, but recruiting officers begged him for more. In 1914 newsreels were an infant technology and radio broadcasts had not begun, but the poster was...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Portraits of the Mutiny

    British artists’ imaginative depictions of the 1857 sepoy rebellion helped fan the flames of public outrage. To say that the outbreak of the sepoy rebellion in northern India in the spring of 1857 shocked and appalled the British would...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Garibaldi’s Panoramic Exploits

    Before photography, people flocked to panoramas to gaze at far-flung scenes painted on huge canvases, as moderators dramatized the unfolding events. Unification and nationalism were the watchwords of the nineteenth century. While nations...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Colt Idol

    The 20-something Montana oil painter has branded himself ‘The New Face of the Old West’...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Return From Rimini

    Sam Lyons’ painting commemorates a September 1944 raid on Italy’s Gothic Line. Veteran aviation artist Sam Lyons had to carry out some detective work in the course of research for his latest commissioned painting. Return From Rimini...