Ancient History Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Ancient History

  • Ask Mr. History

    Questions About the School System

    Questions About the School System...

  • HistoryNet

    The Cimbrian War, 113-101 B.C.

    Roman victory marked the beginning of the end for Rome as a republic. For a third of a century after Rome destroyed Carthage in 146 B.C., it faced no seriously threatening enemies in the Mediterranean region. Yet a major challenge was...

  • HistoryNet

    The Viking Assault on Constantinople, 860

    The “fury of the Northmen” hit the Byzantine Empire in a surprise attack on the Queen of Cities. Byzantine Emperor Theophilus was gracious in his treatment of the two ambassadors who had arrived unexpectedly in the imperial capital,...

  • HistoryNet

    Siege of Lachish, 701 B.C.

    The Assyrians’ mastery of siegecraft conquered ancient Judah. The opening stanza of Lord Byron’s imortrtal poem “The Destruction of Sennacherib” resonates with a sense of the overwhelming catastrophe the Assyrian “wolf”...

  • HistoryNet

    Battle of Himera, 480 B.C.

    Greeks defeated the Carthaginian invasion of Sicily. Xerxes, “king of kings,” ruler of the vast Persian Empire, prepared well for his revenge against the Greeks. Not only did he amass the largest army the world had ever seen with the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: When Empires Collapse

    Do wars cause empires and societies to collapse? History’s answers are never black and white. Warfare is frequently blamed for the collapse of empires. But histor­ical examples of societies that fell after warfare can be placed in two...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Best of Princes, the Best of Armies

    A survivor of Rome’s glory days, Trajan’s Column celebrates an emperor’s ego and his army’s engineering know-how. In AD 113 the Roman senate dedicated a monument commemorating the emperor Trajan’s victories in the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artemisia at Salamis

    When the outnumbered Greek feet outfought Xerxes’s great navy in 480 BC, the Persians’ only winner was Artemisia, history’s first known female admiral. In 411 BC the Greek playwright Aristophanes staged his famous play comedy in...

  • Ask Mr. History

    Did the Ancient Romans Wear Underwear?

    Did the ancient Romans wear underwear?? Ryan Krause   ???   Ryan, The Romans—like numerous peoples before them—most certainly did wear underwear, the most fundamental of which was a loincloth knotted on both sides. It went...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Can You Hear Me Now?

    Before telegraph, telephone, and radio, how did the ancients exert battlefield command and control?...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Lake Trasimeno, Italy

    Lago Trasimeno is the largest lake on the Italian peninsula. It abuts the Umbria-Tuscany border roughly between the ancient city-states of Perugia and Siena. The surrounding countryside is bucolic and peaceful. More than 2,200 years ago,...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from Marathon, 490 BC

    In the summer of 490 fleet of 600 trireme vessels, sent by King Darius I and commanded by BC a Persian his experienced Median admiral Datis, set out from Ionia with an army of 25,000 men—light infantry, cavalry and archers—bound for...

  • MHQ

    6 Questions | Author Erich B. Anderson

    ERICH B. ANDERSON is a freelance writer with a B.A. in history and anthropology from Northern Illinois University and a member of the Authors Guild. He has written numerous articles for History Today, Military History Monthly, Ancient...

  • MHQ Magazine

    When Did Warfare Begin?

    Archaeology, evolution, and the evidence of early human conflict When did humans begin to kill humans? Or more precisely, when did groups of humans learn to cooperate to kill members of other groups? The debate on this subject is old and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Laws of War: Uniting a Fractious Greece

    Philip II, in his 20s when he ascended the throne of Macedon in 359 B.C., had ambitious ideas for his backward realm at the edge of the feuding city-states of Greece. Under his rule, Macedonian nobles grew richer and understood that the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Empire Vs. Tribe: The Roman Empire and the Celts

    For five centuries the Roman and Celtic armies and cultures clashed, pitting the most highly organized state of the ancient world against fierce individualists. War horns brayed eerily, swords thudded against shields with a dull menace,...