Ancient History Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Ancient History

  • HistoryNet

    Greek Hoplites, 700-300 B.C.

    These citizen-soldiers of ancient Greece were nearly unstoppable. Greek hoplites were infantry warriors who carried shields, were primarily armed with spears, and fought in the disciplined ranks of a phalanx formation – a solid mass of...

  • HistoryNet

    Rome’s Parthian War, A.D. 161-166

    Old enemies battled in the ancient Middle East. Roman emperor Antoninus Pius (reigned A.D. 138-161) made sure his heirs stayed in Rome under his watchful eye. Thus both of his adoptive sons, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, achieved...

  • HistoryNet

    The First Aryan Blitzkrieg

    Over three millennia before Hitler’s “lightning warfare,” chariot-borne Aryan warriors overran the ancient world. The chariots of Mursilis I, grandson of the Hittite Empire’s founder, were nearing the end of their raid that had...

  • HistoryNet

    The Fall of Elam, 645 B.C.

    Assyrians obliterated the troublesome kingdom in present-day Iran. Twenty-first century Iran exasperates its neighbors and defies the world’s major powers with its outrageous and often belligerent behavior. Yet over 2,600 years ago the...

  • HistoryNet

    The Great Siege of Jerusalem

    Roman legions crush The Zealots’ Revolt. Religious extremists within a traditional society in the Middle East rebel against powerful Western influences the fanatics view as threatening their faith. The society itself is torn between...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Alexander the Monster

    Historians say the battlefield atrocities of the Macedonian king were part of his brilliant military strategy. But were they really born of his personality? Alexander III, king of the ancient state of Macedon, is often heralded as one of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Conquer or Die! Hannibal Vs Scipio

    When the armies of Hannibal and Scipio collided in North Africa, the battle gave rise to an empire. One day in late October 202 BC, two of the ancient world’s greatest generals met for a parley. The Second Punic War, between Carthage and...

  • Military History Magazine

    Making the Rules of War

    From ancient origins the informal rules of war have developed into a complex code designed to curb man’s lawless violence. But does it work? All’s fair in love and war. In love, perhaps—in war almost never. Despite the impression...

  • Ask Mr. History

    Questions About the School System

    Questions About the School System...

  • HistoryNet

    The Cimbrian War, 113-101 B.C.

    Roman victory marked the beginning of the end for Rome as a republic. For a third of a century after Rome destroyed Carthage in 146 B.C., it faced no seriously threatening enemies in the Mediterranean region. Yet a major challenge was...

  • HistoryNet

    The Viking Assault on Constantinople, 860

    The “fury of the Northmen” hit the Byzantine Empire in a surprise attack on the Queen of Cities. Byzantine Emperor Theophilus was gracious in his treatment of the two ambassadors who had arrived unexpectedly in the imperial capital,...

  • HistoryNet

    Siege of Lachish, 701 B.C.

    The Assyrians’ mastery of siegecraft conquered ancient Judah. The opening stanza of Lord Byron’s imortrtal poem “The Destruction of Sennacherib” resonates with a sense of the overwhelming catastrophe the Assyrian “wolf”...

  • HistoryNet

    Battle of Himera, 480 B.C.

    Greeks defeated the Carthaginian invasion of Sicily. Xerxes, “king of kings,” ruler of the vast Persian Empire, prepared well for his revenge against the Greeks. Not only did he amass the largest army the world had ever seen with the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: When Empires Collapse

    Do wars cause empires and societies to collapse? History’s answers are never black and white. Warfare is frequently blamed for the collapse of empires. But histor­ical examples of societies that fell after warfare can be placed in two...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Best of Princes, the Best of Armies

    A survivor of Rome’s glory days, Trajan’s Column celebrates an emperor’s ego and his army’s engineering know-how. In AD 113 the Roman senate dedicated a monument commemorating the emperor Trajan’s victories in the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artemisia at Salamis

    When the outnumbered Greek feet outfought Xerxes’s great navy in 480 BC, the Persians’ only winner was Artemisia, history’s first known female admiral. In 411 BC the Greek playwright Aristophanes staged his famous play comedy in...