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Thomas Jefferson

Facts, information and articles about Thomas Jefferson, the Third U.S. President

Thomas Jefferson Facts

Born

4/13/1743

Died

7/4/1826

Years Of Service

1801-1809

Spouse

Martha Wayles

Accomplishments

Third President Of the United States

Thomas Jefferson Articles

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Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale, 1800
Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale, 1800
Thomas Jefferson summary: Thomas Jefferson was the third president of the United States of America. Jefferson was born in Shadwell, Virginia in 1743. He was educated at the College of William and Mary, and he later practiced law while also serving as a magistrate and then a county magistrate. In addition to this, he was also a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1776, while a member in the Continental Congress, Jefferson was chosen to write the Declaration of Independence. He later returned to his home in Virginia, Monticello, followed by a term as governor between 1779 and 1781. In 1784, he returned to politics, serving as a trade commissioner in France. President George Washington named Jefferson as his secretary of state in 1790. Jefferson made an unsuccessful bid for president in 1796 as the Democratic party’s candidate; he became vice president after losing the election to John Adams.

He beat John Adams in the election of 1800, becoming the third president of the United States of America. During his first term, he was responsible for setting up the purchase of the Louisiana Territory, considerably adding to the size of the country. During his second term, his attempts at remaining neutral in the disagreement between Great Britain and France failed. After his second term, Jefferson returned to Monticello, and at 76 years old, he founded the University of Virginia. Thomas Jefferson died in 1826 on the date of the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.


 

Articles Featuring Thomas Jefferson From History Net Magazines

Articles 1

Has the U.S. Federal Government always been expanding?Jon, Has there ever been a time in the history of the United States when the size, scope and reach of the Federal Government was not on the increase? Sincerely, Mike Caplanis (a fan) ? ? ? Dear Mike, Since American history is as much the story of domestic and later foreign expansion as well …
To Catch a Traitor: John Champe Pursues Benedict ArnoldTo trap Benedict Arnold, Major John Champe pretended to be a turncoat himself
Touring the Erie CanalThe Erie Canal Historical Corridor offers visitors a wealth of historic sites, beautiful scenery, unique shops and excellent restaurants.
Daily Quiz for December 13, 2012This president kept his late wife’s memory alive by hanging her portrait in the private quarters and ordering the staff to place fresh flowers in front of it daily.
‘First Freedom: The Fight for Religious Liberty’ – A Preview'American Experience: First Freedom - The Fight for Religious Liberty,' premiering Dec. 18 on PBS, is an informative, even-handed examination of why America's founders made religious liberty a basic human right.
Civil War MemoryHarold Holzer explores revisionism and Civil War memory
Picture of the Day: January 11Alexander Hamilton American patriot and statesman Alexander Hamilton, the illegitimate son of a Scottish merchant, was born on St. Croix probably on January 11, 1755. After showing remarkable promise in finance, the young Hamilton was sent by a benefactor to King’s College in New York. In 1776, Hamilton joined the Continental Army, where he soon …
Picture of the Day: November 9Benjamin Banneker was born in Maryland on November 9, 1731, and grew up a free black man. From his farm near Baltimore, Banneker spent much of his time studying the stars. Although he lacked much of a formal education, he taught himself with borrowed books and became a noted mathematician, astronomer and inventor. Carving its …
Picture of the Day: July 4Declaration of Independence More than a year after the first fighting of the American Revolution broke out in Lexington and Concord, the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776, officially breaking America’s legal ties with England. Authored largely by Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, the Declaration of Independence remains one of the most stirring …
Multi-Media Review: Thomas Jefferson: A View From the Mountain: AHTHOMAS JEFFERSON: A VIEW FROM THE MOUNTAIN(Lou Reda Productions, Inc., $24.95). The documentary on the life of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), produced for the Public Television Network by its Central Virginia station in 1994 is now available on video. The narrative highlights Jefferson’s youth as a conscientious student who spent 14 to 15 hours a day …
Letters to American History: April ’00 LettersTHE REAL THOMAS PAINE? In his article on Thomas Paine ("Revolution with Pen & Ink," February 2000), William Kashatus is to be lauded for shedding some light on the enormous role Thomas Paine played in the American Revolution–a role shamefully ignored in this country. The author is quite correct in depicting a man dedicated to …
William W. Brown – Cover Page: December ’99 American History FeatureWilliam W. Brown After his 1834 escape to freedom, fugitive slave William Wells Brown used his literary talents for the abolitionist cause and to record the history of America’s blacks. By Marsh Cassady At just after 8 p.m. on February 2, 1857, an air of expectancy gripped the crowd assembled in the town hall in …
American History: December 1999 From the EditorThoughts on HistoryIn our last issue we looked at an episode from George Washington’s Revolutionary War days. This time author John Ferling examines the general’s final years. Though less exciting than his military service, Washington’s period of retirement offers its own small fascinations. Reading about Washington’s daily routine is something like seeing a marble statue …
American History: April 1999 From the EditorThoughts on History Sometimes it seems that the thing politicians do best is create scandal. As I write this just after New Year’s Day, a president of the United States has been impeached by the House of Representatives for only the second time in the country’s history, and the Senate is preparing for a trial. What …
Letters to American History: June ’99LOSS AT OKINAWA I’ve often heard the Destroyer Squadron II accident ("The Point of No Return," June 1999) billed as the U.S. Navy’s worst peacetime disaster, yet as bad as it was, it was small potatoes compared to the navy’s losses on October 9, 1945, at Okinawa. On that day, a typhoon swept through the …
Eyewitness to War: Hinton Rowan Helper incurred the wrath of his fellow Southerners by writing a strident anti-slavery treatise – January ’98 America’s Civil War FeatureSouthern-born Hinton Helper–not Harriet Beecher Stowe–wrote the most stinging indictment of slavery. By Joseph Gustaitis The myth probably began with Abraham Lincoln. When he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, in 1862, Lincoln supposedly said, “So you are the little lady who wrote the book that started this great war.” Ever since …
Order vs. Liberty: October ’98 American History FeatureWhen Congress passed the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798, it opened a heated debate about the limits of freedom in a free society. By Larry Gragg On July 4, 1798, the citizens of the capital city of Philadelphia turned out in large numbers to celebrate the nation’s independence day. While militia companies marched through …
first thunder at SHILOH – Cover Page: March 1997 Civil War Times Featurefirst thunder at SHILOH A REBEL BATTERY’S FIRST SALVO WAS THE PRELUDE TO A STORM THE UNTESTED CANNONEERS COULD NEVER HAVE IMAGINED JON G. STEPHENSON A Confederate artillery captain peered through his field glasses, calmly studying the distant tree line. It was a lovely day. A breeze ruffled the budding branches of the oaks that …
The Black Bean Lottery: October ’97 American History FeatureIn March 1843, 176 members of an unauthorized army of Texans captured in Mexico drew beans from a jar to determine which 17 among them would die for their alleged crimes. By Peter F. Stevens As war raged across the rugged Mexican countryside during the summer of 1847, Major Walter Lane led a detachment of …
American History: April 1997 From the EditorThoughts on HistoryAs we were preparing this issue of American History, which includes on page 16 an article by Mark Dunkelman about Amos Humiston, a Union soldier who died during the Battle of Gettysburg, leaving a wife and three small children behind, we received a letter from a reader named Anna Pansini, which struck a …
Travelers to Wartime Richmond – Sept. ’96 America’s Civil War FeatureTravelers to wartime Richmond had a wide choiceof luxurious hotels, inns and taverns. By John K. Trammell The outbreak of the Civil War ushered in an era of radical change in Virginia. Starting with fanatical John Brown’s failed revolution at Harpers Ferry, and ending with a devastating defeat and painful reconstruction six years later, citizens …
Kill Cavalry’s Nasty Surprise – Nov. ’96 America’s Civil War FeatureKill Cavalry’s NASTY SURPRISE Union General William Sherman considered Judson Kilpatrick, his cavalry chief, ‘a hell of a damn fool.’ At Monroe’s Cross Roads, N.C., his carelessness and disobedience of orders proved Sherman’s point. By William Preston Mangum II Major General William Tecumseh Sherman had made a swift and steady advance through Georgia and South …
1796: The First Real Election – Cover Page: December ’96 American History Feature1796: The First Real Election BY JOHN FERLING WHEN GEORGE WASHINGTON ANNOUNCED THAT HE WOULD RETIRE FROM OFFICE, HE SET THE STAGEFOR THE NATION’S FIRST TWO-PARTY PRESIDENTIALCAMPAIGN. On the day in April 1789 that he took the oath of office at Federal Hall in New York City as the first president of the United States, …

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