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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists on War: Revenge on Canvas

    A general mistreated by the enemy settles the score—and is immortalized in a painting that came to symbolize Britain’s domination of India. A few years after her husband died, the widow of Major General David Baird approached British...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Sea Change- Reinvention of the U.S. Navy

    How the U.S. Navy reinvented itself— and its sailors—during a century of radical change in technology and warfare. Navies, at first sight, appear to be highly traditional, even reactionary, organizations. The 21st-century U.S. Navy...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Marathon Men

    The conventional wisdom is that the Athenians at the Battle of Marathon were amateur soldiers who won by chance. In reality, they were the Israel Defense Force of their day—smart, highly trained, and merciless. Before dawn on September...

  • MHQ Magazine

    ‘A Moment Full of Peril’

    When John Brown seized Harpers Ferry and threatened to spark a slave insurrection, officials in Washington concluded only one man could stop him: Colonel Robert E. Lee. Depending on your source, John Brown’s 1859 Harpers Ferry raid was...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience of War: Morphine, Splints, and Hot Tea

    Early in World War I, a doctor follows a day of fierce fighting at the Marne with a long night caring for the wounded and dying. Arthur Anderson Martin, a small-town doctor from New Zealand, was attending a medical conference in England...

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    Arms and Men: Pump Up the Volume

    From trumpets at Jericho to Eminem at Fallujah, music and sound have been valuable weapons. Lieutenant Colonel Bill Kilgore leads his helicopter gunships in over the beach. Loudspeakers on the choppers blast Richard Wagner’s “The Ride...

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Winter 2012

    Does Torture Work? I take issue with Colin Woodard’s one-sided conclusion in “Why We Won’t Give Up Torture” Autumn 2011—that it does not work. Discussing torture used in the war on terrorism, he cites only one source, CIA officer...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Catch Me If You Can

    How a crafty German admiral led the Royal Navy on a wild chase across the Mediterranean and changed the balance of power in the First World War. Almost a year into World War I, American diplomat Lewis Einstein met Wilhelm Souchon, a rear...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Did FDR Doom Us to a Longer War?

    He sided with Churchill. He ignored his military advisers. As commander in chief of the United States during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt seized the controls of America’s war-making apparatus more firmly than any...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The 27-Day War

    Just a month after 9/11 a handful of CIA men and U.S. Special Forces soldiers in Afghanistan—backed by cavalry, cash, and airstrikes—toppled the Taliban. At dusk on September 19, 2001, eight days after al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attack claimed...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Fireball at Zonchio

    A ferocious battle with the Turks marked the end of Venice’s sea power. On October 31, 1498, a Venetian merchant, Andrea Gritti, wrote home from the Ottoman capital of Constantinople: “I can’t tell you more about business and...

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Spring 2012

    Gentlemen, Choose Your Weapons I’m surprised that Chris McNab did not include the machine gun in “The Six Most Influential Weapons in History” Winter 2012. A lot of weapons were developed or tested in World War I, including poison...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Artists Review: Victory at What Cost?

    Daniel Maclise’s murals of Waterloo and Trafalgar dramatically illustrate the sacrifices of war. For nearly 150 years, British politicians have filed past two massive murals lining the walls of the Royal Gallery in the Houses of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Greatest Ancient Leader

    When Theodore Ayrault Dodge, the American Civil War historian known for his love of the ancient generals, dubbed Alexander, Hannibal, and Caesar “great captains” in 1889, imperial ambition was some- thing to be admired. Today, after...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Clearing the Fog of War

    In the late 1800s, countries raced to make smokeless gunpowder. The result changed the face of battle. The story of smokeless gunpowder begins in Switzerland, in the impeccable kitchen of Frau Schönbein. One fateful day in 1845, her...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Through a Lens Darkly

    A photographer in North Africa found that survival mattered more than great images. On November 10, 1941, 36-year-old Croswell Bowen boarded a ship headed for war. Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entry into World War II were still weeks away,...