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Aviation History Magazine




  • Aviation History Magazine

    Jumbo: Boeing 747

    Boeing’s 747 didn’t just revolutionize airline travel, it changed the world as we know it. If you were a hotshot airplane designer at Boeing in 1965, there was only one place you wanted to be. The aerodynamicists, the airframe...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel: Eagle of the Eastern Front

    Hans-Ulrich Rudel, Germany’s most highly decorated combat pilot, only shot down nine enemy aircraft, but he destroyed the equivalent of more than three Soviet tank corps Until very recently the remote forward airstrip had been deep...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Civil Air Patrol’s Combat Pilots

    During the early stages of World War II, the Civil Air Patrol played a vital role in helping defend American merchant ships from marauding U-boats. Natural disasters always place high demands on the nation’s emergency services. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Building Rudel’s Tank-Busting Stuka

    Academy’s 1/72nd-scale kit (no. 1641) of the Junkers Ju-87G-1 Stuka is the early long-winged version of the dive bomber. It comes with two underwing 37mm “tank-busting” cannons. Start by painting the cockpit and gunner/radio...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Flying Cowboy: Frederick Libby

    Frederick Libby became America’s first ace while flying as an observer-gunner in a spindly British pusher-propelled biplane. The apprentice airman could scarcely believe his situation. Yesterday he had been a supply truck driver with the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Antonov’s Heavy Hauler for Hire

    The Antonov State Company outdid itself at thinking big with the An-225 Mriya, the world’s largest airplane. There’s no getting around the fact that Russia is a big country. Perhaps that explains why Russians seem to have always been...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Flying Container Ship: The XC-120

    The Fairchild XC-120 “Pack plane” featured an intriguing modular transport design that never achieved full maturity. Fairchild’s C-119 was one of the most utilitarian military cargo planes of the post-World War II era. First flown in...

  • HistoryNet Video

    VIDEO: Blue Angels’ Fat Albert Flies Again

    “Fat Albert,” the Navy’s flight demonstration squadron’s C-130T Hercules transport plane, made its return with a flat pass during a July 14, 2018, air show in Pensacola, Florida, where the Blue Angels are...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Shear Terror

    Thunderstorm-generated wind shear was poorly understood until three major airline accidents compelled meteorologists and aviation experts to find solutions to the problem   On June 24, 1975, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Project Thunderstorm

    The first weather hunters put their lives on the line to gather data on the life cycle of thunderstorms. The Witch of November was laying down the law. An ominous weather front whipped the iron-green waters of Lake Erie into a froth. The...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Marathons in the Air

    There’s a good reason why the flight endurance record has stood since 1959: Who wants to spend more than 65 days crammed in a lightplane?   Before the advent of aerial refueling, fuel tank capacity was the main determining...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Web Update: Spirit of St. Louis 2

    The 91st anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s record-making transatlantic flight has come and gone while Spirit of St. Louis 2, a scratch-built replica of the famous airplane, remains grounded (see “Spirit of St. Louis 2,” March 2018...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Spirit of St. Louis 2

    If all goes according to plan, a replica of Charles Lindbergh’s historic Spirit of St. Louis will take off from Long Island on May 20, 2018, to re-create “Lucky Lindy’s” solo, nonstop flight to Paris. Spirit of St. Louis 2, dubbed...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bloody 100th

    The Eighth Air Force’s 100th Bomb Group earned its nickname the hard way in the brutal skies over Germany. Only one World War II U.S. Army Air Forces tail flash survives in the present-day U.S. Air Force: the Square D. Seventy-five...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Percival Spencer’s Air Car: Everyman’s Amphibian

    Percival Spencer’s 1941 Air Car design formed the template for two generations of amphibious lightplanes. For ordinary Americans living through the Great Depression, the notion of privately owning a seaplane—even a small one used for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Clash of Titans Over Korea

    On April 12, 1953, two aerial champions dueled at 40,000 feet over North Korea: MiG-15 ace Semyon Fedorets and F-86 Sabre ace Joe McConnell. In recent years, Russia has confirmed a fact long suspected by United Nations airmen: Soviet...