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Joseph Hooker

Facts, information and articles about Joseph Hooker, a Civil War General during the American Civil War

Joseph Hooker Facts

Born

November 13, 1814 Hadley, Massachusetts

Died

October 31, 1879 Garden City, New York

Years Of Service

1837–1853, 1861–1868 (USA)
1859–1861 (California)

Rank

Major General (USA)
Colonel (California)

Commands

I Corps, Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac
XX Corps, Army of the Tennessee

Battles

Seminole Wars
Mexican-American War
American Civil War
Battle of Williamsburg
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Chattanooga Campaign
Atlanta Campaign

Joseph Hooker Articles

Explore articles from the History Net archives about Joseph Hooker

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Joseph Hooker summary: Joseph Hooker was an officer for the United States Army, achieving a rank of major general during the Civil War for the Union army. Though Hooker served with distinction throughout most of the war, he is mostly remembered by the loss at the Battle of Chancellorsville.

Joseph Hooker’s Early Years

Hooker’s family had a tradition in military service. His grandfather was a captain during the American Revolutionary War. He went to the US Military Academy and graduated in 1837. Eventually he became a second lieutenant for the first United States artillery. He was in staff positions during the Mexican-American War and he also received promotions for leadership in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec.

Joseph Hooker In The Civil War

During the Civil War, Hooker was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers. He was the commander of a brigade and eventually a division close to Washington DC. By the Peninsula Campaign, Hooker served as the commander of the Second Division of the Third Corps. Hooker was not afraid to be open about criticism of General McClellan. One of his most famous quotes about McClellan was the McClellan “is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldiership is.” Fighting Joe Hooker became the commander for the Army of the Potomac in 1863 and that was due to a reputation he had for his aggressive fighting, something that those before him lacked. He was on the wrong end during the Battle of Chancellorsville which has also been known as General Lee’s Perfect Battle.

Hooker After The War

After the assassination of President Lincoln, Hooker led the funeral procession in Springfield in 1865. Hooker suffered a stroke which left him partially paralyzed and he retired from the army in October of 1868. He died in Garden City, New York and was laid to rest in Cincinnati, Ohio at Spring Grove Cemetery.


 

Articles Featuring Joseph Hooker From History Net Magazines

Battle Of South Mountain: Battlefield And BeyondJune Issue Extra: Lee’s first invasion of Union territory was turned back at the Battle of South Mountain
The Ultimate Political Action Committee

A congressional war panel proves too many cooks can poison the pot

By any standard, Ball's Bluff was a fiasco. What began as a raid in October 1861 escalated into an unintended battle for Leesburg, Va. The Yankees so badly …

What a difference a day makes


Confederate soldiers under the command of Gen. Robert E. Lee camp on the outskirts of Hagerstown, Maryland, in September of 1862. Image courtesy of Weider History Group archive.

War seemed far away to the editors of a Maryland weekly newspaper–until

Building the Army of the PotomacStephen Sears writes of how the Army of the Potomac's politically appointed generals and short-term volunteer troops nearly unhinged Lincoln’s plans in 1861 to win the Civil War.
Black Jack John Logan Goes to WarUnlike most politicians, John Logan played a pivotal role on the battlefield.
'The Roar and Rattle': McClellan's Missed Opportunities at AntietamThe Battle of Antietam resulted in more pivotal changes, across a broader spectrum of events—military, political, diplomatic, societal—than any other battle of the war. Yet if evaluated in purely military terms, it was not decisive at all.
Who kept U.S. Grant sober?John Rawlins used his brains and blue language to keep his boss in check.
Hanging Captain GordonNathaniel Gordon was the only American sent to the gallows for slave traiding.
Union General Daniel SicklesOn two separate battlefields, Union General Daniel Sickles carelessly exposed his men -- and the entire army -- to possible defeat. Only the quick actions of other Federal officers managed to compensate for Sickles' errors and keep his mistakes from becoming disasters. It was life as usual for 'Devil Dan.'
Daniel Sickles: An Unlikely Union GeneralThe Civil War salvaged Dan Sickles' career and saved him from financial ruin.
Unraveling the Myths of Burnside BridgeIt is clear that Union general Ambrose Burnside’s failures at Antietam cannot be written off to ineptness or petty insubordination, but what really did happen at "Burnside's Bridge?"
Intelligence: The Secret War Within America's Civil WarSpies, slaves, fake deserters, signal towers, and newspapers were all sources of intelligence Union and Confederate commanders used to peer into the enemy's plans.
America's Civil War: Defense of Little Round TopUnion Colonel Joshua Chamberlain has long been lauded as the hero of Gettysburg's Little Round Top. But do Chamberlain and the 20th Maine deserve all the credit, or did he have some unheralded help?
Battle of Salem Church: Final Federal Assault at ChancellorsvilleWhile a dazed 'Fighting Joe' Hooker reeled from the brilliant Confederate flank attack at Chancellorsville, Union Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick fought his way past Rebel defenders to attack the enemy rear. At Salem Church, he tried to open a second front -- and possibly save the day.

By George Rogan

Battle of Antietam: Federal Flank Attack at Dunker ChurchWith Union Major General Joseph Hooker's I Corps lying shattered in the blood-soaked cornfield at Antietam, Brigadier General George Greene's 'Bully Boys' somehow managed to punch a salient in the Confederate line. But would they be able to hold it?

By Robert C. Cheeks

Battle of Peachtree CreekNear the sluggish creek on the outskirts of Atlanta, new Confederate commander John Bell Hood struck the first 'manly blow' for Atlanta,living up to his lifelong reputation as a fighter--but accomplishing little. It would be a bad omen for all Hood's subsequent campaigns.

By Phil Noblitt

Battle of Ox HillWith Union General John Pope reeling in defeat after the Battle of Second Manassas, Stonewall Jackson confidently set out to block Pope's retreat. It would be easy pickings--so Jackson thought.

By Robert James

Hoodwinked During America's Civl War: Union Military DeceptionHoodwinked During the Civl War: Union Military Deception
Account Of The Battle of the WildernessIn the dark, forbidding woods of Virginia's Wilderness, Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee stumbled blindly toward their first wartime encounter. Neither had a clear idea of his opponent's intentions, but each planned to do what he did best--attack.
Battle of Antietam: Controversial Crossing on Burnside's BridgeShould General Ambrose Burnside have ordered his men to wade Antietam Creek? Author Marvel undertook a personal odyssey to find out.
44th Georgia Regiment Volunteers in the American Civil WarThe hard-fighting 44th Georgia suffered some of the heaviest losses of any regiment in the Civil War.
Battle of Antietam: Carnage in a CornfieldMr. Miller's humble cornfield near Antietam Creek became the unlikely setting for perhaps the worst fighting of the entire Civil War.
Battle of Resaca: Botched Union AttackWilliam Tecumseh Sherman waited expectantly to hear that his accomplished young protégé, James B. McPherson, had successfully gotten astride the railroad at Resaca and cut off the Confederate line of retreat. Hours went by with no word from McPherson. What was 'Mac' doing in Snake Creek Gap?
America's Civil War: Savage Skirmish Near SharpsburgWith Robert E. Lee's wily Confederates waiting somewhere in the vicinity of Antietam Creek, Union General George McClellan ordered I Corps commander Joseph Hooker to advance and turn the Rebel flank. But McClellan, for once, was too quick to move, and Hooker soon found himself in an unexpectedly vicious fight.
America's Civil War: XI Corps Fight During the Chancellorsville CampaignDisliked and distrusted by their comrades in the Army of the Potomac, the men of the XI Corps would find their reputation further damaged by a twilight encounter with Stonewall Jackson's troops in the dark woods at Chancellorsville.

The Dahlgren Papers RevisitedThe mystery surrounding documents detailing a Union plan to murder Jefferson Davis is put to rest by historian Stephen W. Sears.
Abraham Lincoln: Commander in ChiefAlthough he lacked the military experience, President Abraham Lincoln took on active direction of the Union war effort, influencing and managing events and generals in every field of operations.
Battle of HanoverSouthern beau sabreur J.E.B. Stuart hardly expected to run head-on into enemy cavalry on his second ride around the Union Army. But a trio of 'boy generals' would soon give the famed Confederate horseman all the action he could handle.
Battle of Yellow TavernBadly misunderstanding his opponent's intentions, Jeb Stuart played into Phil Sheridan's hands at Yellow Tavern. A swirling cavalry fight ensued.
Savage Skirmish Near Sharpsburg - September '98 America's Civil War Feature


Savage Skirmish Near Sharpsburg

By Scott Hosier

With Robert E. Lee's wily Confederates waiting somewhere in the vicinity of Antietam Creek, Union General George McClellan ordered I Corps commander Joseph Hooker to advance and turn the Rebel flank. But McClellan, …

Carnage in a Cornfield - September '98 America's Civil War Feature


Carnage in a Cornfield

By Robert C. Cheeks

Mr. Miller's humble cornfield near Antietam Creek became the unlikely setting for perhaps the worst fighting of the entire Civil War.

On Sunday night, September 14, 1862, Confederate General Robert E. Lee …

Cavalry Clash at Hanover - January '98 America's Civil War Feature


Cavalry Clash at Hanover

By Brent L. Vosburg

Southern beau sabreur J.E.B. Stuart hardly expected to run head-on into enemy cavalry on his second ride around the Union Army. But a trio of 'boy generals' would soon give the famed …

Rebels in Pennsylvania! - August 1998 Civil War Times Feature


Rebels in Pennsylvania!

The spearhead of Lee's army was about to strike a lethal blow at the very heart of the Keystone State when the Battle of Gettysburg interrupted.

BY UZAL ENT

Gettysburg was a small rural town with no …

The 44th Georgia Suffered Some of the Heaviest Losses - March '96 America's Civil War Feature

The hard-fighting 44th Georgia suffered some of the heaviest losses of any regiment in the Civil War.
By Gerald J. Smith

On March 10, 1862, companies of Georgians from Henry, Jasper, Clarke, Spalding, Clayton, Putnam, Fayette, Pike, Morgan, Henry and …

Day One at Chancellorsville - March '96 America's Civil War Feature

New Union commander 'Fighting Joe' Hooker planned to encircle Robert E. Lee at the Virginia crossroads hamlet of Chancellorsville. The plan seemed to be working perfectly, until….
By Al Hemingway

Early in the evening on April 29, 1863, Major General …

Return To The Killing Ground - November '97 America's Civil War Feature


Return To The Killing Ground

By Jeffry D. Wert

Brash, bombastic John Pope tempted fate by returning to the old battleground at Manassas. He thought he had caught Robert E. Lee napping. He was wrong.

A heavy, soaking rain fell …

The Proving Ground - April '96 Civil War Times Feature

thePROVINGground

The Mexican War gave future civil war generals their first taste of combatJOHN C. WAUGH

Chatham Roberdeau Wheat would one day lead a famous Louisiana battalion called "Wheat's Tigers" into battle for the Confederacy. He would fight and die …

Mexican War: The Proving Ground for Future American Civil War GeneralsFor young American army officers of the time, the Mexican War was not only the road to glory, it was the road to promotion--a proving ground for future Civil War generals.

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