Joseph Hooker | HistoryNet MENU

Joseph Hooker

Facts, information and articles about Joseph Hooker, a Civil War General during the American Civil War

Joseph Hooker Facts

Born

November 13, 1814 Hadley, Massachusetts

Died

October 31, 1879 Garden City, New York

Years Of Service

1837–1853, 1861–1868 (USA)
1859–1861 (California)

Rank

Major General (USA)
Colonel (California)

Commands

I Corps, Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac
XX Corps, Army of the Tennessee

Battles

Seminole Wars
Mexican-American War
American Civil War
Battle of Williamsburg
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Chattanooga Campaign
Atlanta Campaign

Joseph Hooker Articles

Explore articles from the History Net archives about Joseph Hooker

» See all Joseph Hooker Articles

Joseph Hooker summary: Joseph Hooker was an officer for the United States Army, achieving a rank of major general during the Civil War for the Union army. Though Hooker served with distinction throughout most of the war, he is mostly remembered by the loss at the Battle of Chancellorsville.

Joseph Hooker’s Early Years

Hooker’s family had a tradition in military service. His grandfather was a captain during the American Revolutionary War. He went to the US Military Academy and graduated in 1837. Eventually he became a second lieutenant for the first United States artillery. He was in staff positions during the Mexican-American War and he also received promotions for leadership in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec.

Joseph Hooker In The Civil War

During the Civil War, Hooker was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers. He was the commander of a brigade and eventually a division close to Washington DC. By the Peninsula Campaign, Hooker served as the commander of the Second Division of the Third Corps. Hooker was not afraid to be open about criticism of General McClellan. One of his most famous quotes about McClellan was the McClellan “is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldiership is.” Fighting Joe Hooker became the commander for the Army of the Potomac in 1863 and that was due to a reputation he had for his aggressive fighting, something that those before him lacked. He was on the wrong end during the Battle of Chancellorsville which has also been known as General Lee’s Perfect Battle.

Hooker After The War

After the assassination of President Lincoln, Hooker led the funeral procession in Springfield in 1865. Hooker suffered a stroke which left him partially paralyzed and he retired from the army in October of 1868. He died in Garden City, New York and was laid to rest in Cincinnati, Ohio at Spring Grove Cemetery.


 

Articles Featuring Joseph Hooker From History Net Magazines

Articles 1

Savage Skirmish Near Sharpsburg – September ’98 America’s Civil War FeatureSavage Skirmish Near Sharpsburg By Scott Hosier With Robert E. Lee’s wily Confederates waiting somewhere in the vicinity of Antietam Creek, Union General George McClellan ordered I Corps commander Joseph Hooker to advance and turn the Rebel flank. But McClellan, for once, was too quick to move, and Hooker soon found himself in an unexpectedly …
Carnage in a Cornfield – September ’98 America’s Civil War FeatureCarnage in a Cornfield By Robert C. Cheeks Mr. Miller’s humble cornfield near Antietam Creek became the unlikely setting for perhaps the worst fighting of the entire Civil War. On Sunday night, September 14, 1862, Confederate General Robert E. Lee issued orders for his much scattered commands to rally at Sharpsburg, Maryland. His ambitious plans …
Cavalry Clash at Hanover – January ’98 America’s Civil War FeatureCavalry Clash at Hanover By Brent L. Vosburg Southern beau sabreur J.E.B. Stuart hardly expected to run head-on into enemy cavalry on his second ride around the Union Army. But a trio of ‘boy generals’ would soon give the famed Confederate horseman all the action he could handle. In mid-June 1863, General Robert E. Lee, …
Rebels in Pennsylvania! – August 1998 Civil War Times FeatureRebels in Pennsylvania! The spearhead of Lee’s army was about to strike a lethal blow at the very heart of the Keystone State when the Battle of Gettysburg interrupted. BY UZAL ENT Gettysburg was a small rural town with no special significance or importance, like the thousands of other small towns that dotted the American …
The 44th Georgia Suffered Some of the Heaviest Losses – March ’96 America’s Civil War FeatureThe hard-fighting 44th Georgia suffered some of the heaviest losses of any regiment in the Civil War.By Gerald J. Smith On March 10, 1862, companies of Georgians from Henry, Jasper, Clarke, Spalding, Clayton, Putnam, Fayette, Pike, Morgan, Henry and Greene counties all assembled at Camp Stephens, outside Griffin. Responding to Governor Joseph Brown’s mandate to …
Day One at Chancellorsville – March ’96 America’s Civil War FeatureNew Union commander ‘Fighting Joe’ Hooker planned to encircle Robert E. Lee at the Virginia crossroads hamlet of Chancellorsville. The plan seemed to be working perfectly, until….By Al Hemingway Early in the evening on April 29, 1863, Major General James Ewell Brown Stuart rode up to the Chancellor farmhouse, a well-known inn 11 miles west …
Return To The Killing Ground – November ’97 America’s Civil War FeatureReturn To The Killing Ground By Jeffry D. Wert Brash, bombastic John Pope tempted fate by returning to the old battleground at Manassas. He thought he had caught Robert E. Lee napping. He was wrong. A heavy, soaking rain fell across northern Virginia on the night of August 30-31, 1862. Despite the storm’s intensity, it …
The Proving Ground – April ’96 Civil War Times FeaturethePROVINGground The Mexican War gave future civil war generals their first taste of combatJOHN C. WAUGH Chatham Roberdeau Wheat would one day lead a famous Louisiana battalion called “Wheat’s Tigers” into battle for the Confederacy. He would fight and die in the Battle of Gaines’ Mill, Virginia, in 1862. But that was still some 15 …
Mexican War: The Proving Ground for Future American Civil War GeneralsFor young American army officers of the time, the Mexican War was not only the road to glory, it was the road to promotion--a proving ground for future Civil War generals.

More Joseph Hooker Articles

Comments are closed.