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Joseph Hooker

Facts, information and articles about Joseph Hooker, a Civil War General during the American Civil War

Joseph Hooker Facts

Born

November 13, 1814 Hadley, Massachusetts

Died

October 31, 1879 Garden City, New York

Years Of Service

1837–1853, 1861–1868 (USA)
1859–1861 (California)

Rank

Major General (USA)
Colonel (California)

Commands

I Corps, Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac
XX Corps, Army of the Tennessee

Battles

Seminole Wars
Mexican-American War
American Civil War
Battle of Williamsburg
Battle of Antietam
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Chattanooga Campaign
Atlanta Campaign

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Joseph Hooker summary: Joseph Hooker was an officer for the United States Army, achieving a rank of major general during the Civil War for the Union army. Though Hooker served with distinction throughout most of the war, he is mostly remembered by the loss at the Battle of Chancellorsville.

Joseph Hooker’s Early Years

Hooker’s family had a tradition in military service. His grandfather was a captain during the American Revolutionary War. He went to the US Military Academy and graduated in 1837. Eventually he became a second lieutenant for the first United States artillery. He was in staff positions during the Mexican-American War and he also received promotions for leadership in the battles of Monterrey, National Bridge and Chapultepec.

Joseph Hooker In The Civil War

During the Civil War, Hooker was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers. He was the commander of a brigade and eventually a division close to Washington DC. By the Peninsula Campaign, Hooker served as the commander of the Second Division of the Third Corps. Hooker was not afraid to be open about criticism of General McClellan. One of his most famous quotes about McClellan was the McClellan “is not only not a soldier, but he does not know what soldiership is.” Fighting Joe Hooker became the commander for the Army of the Potomac in 1863 and that was due to a reputation he had for his aggressive fighting, something that those before him lacked. He was on the wrong end during the Battle of Chancellorsville which has also been known as General Lee’s Perfect Battle.

Hooker After The War

After the assassination of President Lincoln, Hooker led the funeral procession in Springfield in 1865. Hooker suffered a stroke which left him partially paralyzed and he retired from the army in October of 1868. He died in Garden City, New York and was laid to rest in Cincinnati, Ohio at Spring Grove Cemetery.


 

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