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John Reynolds

Facts, information and articles about John Reynolds, a Civil War General during the American Civil War

John Reynolds Facts

Born

September 20, 1820 Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Died

July 1, 1863 Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Years Of Service

1841–63

Rank

Major General

Commands

I Corps, Army of the Potomac

Battles

Mexican-American War
Battle of Monterrey
Battle of Buena Vista
American Civil War
Seven Days Battles
Second Battle of Bull Run
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Battle of Gettysburg

John Reynolds Articles

Explore articles from the History Net archives about John Reynolds

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John Reynolds summary: John Reynolds was one of 9 children of Lydia Moore Reynolds and John Reynolds. He was born in Pennsylvania and his two brothers, James and Will Reynolds, also had military careers. Senator James Buchanan who was a friend of the family nominated Reynolds to the US Military Academy in 1837. During the Mexican-American War, Reynolds was awarded 2 brevet promotions to captain at Monterrey and major for Buena Vista. After Mexico, he was assigned to Maine, Louisiana and New York.

John Reynolds In The Civil War

When the Civil War started, Reynolds was appointed to the 14th US Infantry as lieutenant colonel but he never engaged with the union because he was promoted to a position of brigadier general as early as August of 1861. Reynolds was captured in Virginia at Boatswain’s Swamp and sent to Libby Prison in Richmond. Eventually he was exchanged for Lloyd Tilghman on August 15th. When he returned to Pennsylvania after being traded, he was given a position at the Pennsylvania Reserved division as a commander. That was due to the fact that the commander in that division had been captured just a couple of days after Reynolds was. Eventually Reynolds was put in charge of the Pennsylvania Militia when Robert E. Lee led the invasion of Maryland. Reynolds eventually met President Lincoln and requested to be free of any political influences, which in the past had shown an effect on army commanders during the war.

John Reynolds At Gettysburg

Early on July 1st of 1863, Reynolds found himself in command of the left wing of what was called the Army of the Potomac. Reynolds stood an approach from two infantry brigades from the Confederacy, coming to the aid of John Buford’s cavalry. During the battle, Reynolds was wounded in the back of the head and it is said that he died almost instantly. His body was sent to Taneytown, Maryland and eventually to Lancaster, Pennsylvania. His burial took place on July 4th of 1863. There are disagreements on the place and way of Reynolds’ death with some saying that it happened on East McPherson Ridge while others have it on West McPherson Ridge with a possibility of friendly fire or a Confederate sharp shooter.


 

Articles Featuring John Reynolds From History Net Magazines

Where is General George MeadeHow Union General George G. Meade became the Rodney Dangerfield of the Civil War
Irvin McDowell: The Most Unpopular Man in AmericaTwo words came to define McDowell’s military prowess for the general’s most critical superiors: ‘Bull’ and ‘Run’
America's Civil War: Defense of Little Round TopUnion Colonel Joshua Chamberlain has long been lauded as the hero of Gettysburg's Little Round Top. But do Chamberlain and the 20th Maine deserve all the credit, or did he have some unheralded help?
Battle of Gettysburg FinaleGrievously wounded in body and spirit, the Army of Northern Virginia limped painfully away from Gettysburg while Union commander George Gordon Meade followed slowly -- too slowly, thought Abraham Lincoln.
Trail of Black HawkOutnumbered and harried through trackless swamps, Black Hawk's starving band of Sauk and Fox Indians made a desperate stand along the Mississippi.
Black Hawk WarOutnumbered and harried through trackless swamps, Black Hawk's starving band of Sauk Indians made a desperate stand along the Mississippi.
Account Of The Battle of ChickamaugaOverconfident and overextended, the Union Army of the Cumberland advanced into the deep woods of northwest Georgia. Waiting Confederates did not intend for them to leave. At Chickamauga Creek, the two sides collided.
Second Battle of Manassas: Union Major General John Pope Was No Match for Robert E. LeeBrash, bombastic John Pope tempted fate by returning to the old battleground at Manassas. He thought he had caught Robert E. Lee napping. He was wrong.
Brigadier General John Gibbon's Brief Breach During the Battle of FredericksburgAlthough overshadowed by the doomed Federal attack on the Confederate center, General John Gibbon's 2nd Division managed -- however briefly -- to make a breakthrough on the Union left.
Did Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell Lose the Battle of GettysburgAfter disobeying Robert E. Lee's orders to avoid a general engagement at Gettysburg, Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell received an order to 'press those people.' His failure to do so created a controversy that survives to this day.
Battle of Chancellorsville: Day OneNew Union commander 'Fighting Joe' Hooker planned to encircle Robert E. Lee at the Virginia crossroads hamlet of Chancellorsville. The plan seemed to be working perfectly, until....
General Barlow and General Gordon Meet on Blocher's KnollOn July 1, 1863, two generals, one badly wounded, allegedly met. The veracity of that encounter, now part of Civil War lore, has long been debated.
J.E.B. Stuart: Battle of Gettysburg ScapegoatFollowing the Confederate debacle at Gettysburg, many blamed Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart for leaving General Robert E. Lee in the dark. But was Stuart really to blame for the defeat? And if so, was he the only one at fault?
Battle of HanoverSouthern beau sabreur J.E.B. Stuart hardly expected to run head-on into enemy cavalry on his second ride around the Union Army. But a trio of 'boy generals' would soon give the famed Confederate horseman all the action he could handle.
J.E.B. Stuart: Gettysburg Scapegoat?Following the Confederate debacle at Gettysburg, many blamed Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart for leaving General Robert E. Lee in the dark. But was Stuart really to blame for the defeat? And if so, was he the only one at fault?
Cavalry Clash at Hanover - January '98 America's Civil War Feature


Cavalry Clash at Hanover

By Brent L. Vosburg

Southern beau sabreur J.E.B. Stuart hardly expected to run head-on into enemy cavalry on his second ride around the Union Army. But a trio of 'boy generals' would soon give the famed …

Valley of the Shadow - Sept. '90 America's Civil War Feature

VALLEY OFTHE SHADOW

Overconfident and overextended, the Union Army
of the Cumberland advanced into the deep woods
of northwest Georgia. Waiting Confederates did not
intend for them to leave. At Chickamauga Creek,
the two sides collided.

By Mike Haskew

In …

Day One at Chancellorsville - March '96 America's Civil War Feature

New Union commander 'Fighting Joe' Hooker planned to encircle Robert E. Lee at the Virginia crossroads hamlet of Chancellorsville. The plan seemed to be working perfectly, until….
By Al Hemingway

Early in the evening on April 29, 1863, Major General …

Return To The Killing Ground - November '97 America's Civil War Feature


Return To The Killing Ground

By Jeffry D. Wert

Brash, bombastic John Pope tempted fate by returning to the old battleground at Manassas. He thought he had caught Robert E. Lee napping. He was wrong.

A heavy, soaking rain fell …

Did 'Baldy' Ewell Lose Gettysburg?After disobeying Robert E. Lee's orders to avoid a general engagement at Gettysburg, Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell received an order to 'press those people.' His failure to do so created a controversy that survives to this day.
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