Gallery: USS Leviathan aka SS Vaterland

 

(U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
(U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)

 

A drawing of the dazzle camouflage pattern devised for Leviathan, used for reference in painting up the actual vessel. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
A drawing of the dazzle camouflage pattern devised for Leviathan, used for reference in painting up the actual vessel. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)

 

While troops board from one side, a coal barge loads fuel aboard Leviathan. Until mechanical lifts were available, coaling it by hand was the dirtiest job on the big ship. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
While troops board from one side, a coal barge loads fuel aboard Leviathan. Until mechanical lifts were available, coaling it by hand was the dirtiest job on the big ship. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)

 

An infantry regiment, each man carrying his own entrenching tool, bayonet and canvas-wrapped Model 1903 rifle, boards Leviathan in 1917. Usually occurring after coaling and provisioning, embarking troops took about 24 hours. (U.S. Army via Stephen Harding)
An infantry regiment, each man carrying his own entrenching tool, bayonet and canvas-wrapped Model 1903 rifle, boards Leviathan in 1917. Usually occurring after coaling and provisioning, embarking troops took about 24 hours. (U.S. Army via Stephen Harding)

 

Leviathan’s after deck, already strewn with ventilators, hatch covers and winches, also accommodates lifeboats, cardboard-like floatation devices, cargo-handling equipment and boxes of various supplies. (U.S. Army via Stephen Harding)
Leviathan’s after deck, already strewn with ventilators, hatch covers and winches, also accommodates lifeboats, cardboard-like floatation devices, cargo-handling equipment and boxes of various supplies. (U.S. Army via Stephen Harding)

 

A view of Vaterland’s interior structure beneath the outer skin. (Library of Congress)
A view of Vaterland’s interior structure beneath the outer skin. (Library of Congress)

 

The world’s largest steamship when built, luxury liner Vaterland boasted elegant architecture and furnishings. It featured a winter garden, swimming pool and therapeutic spa rooms, smoking rooms, and a glass-roofed social hall with theatrical stage. The 800-seat dining room (above), a replica of New York City’s Ritz-Carleton’s, was finished with mahogany, walnut, gold, and bronze. (AKG-Images)
The world’s largest steamship when built, luxury liner Vaterland boasted elegant architecture and furnishings. It featured a winter garden, swimming pool and therapeutic spa rooms, smoking rooms, and a glass-roofed social hall with theatrical stage. The 800-seat dining room (above), a replica of New York City’s Ritz-Carleton’s, was finished with mahogany, walnut, gold, and bronze. (AKG-Images)

 

In 1917 Vaterland’s once sumptuous interior was converted to carry up to 7,250 fully equipped soldiers, accommodated in rows of four-tier bunks under relatively claustrophobic conditions. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
In 1917 Vaterland’s once sumptuous interior was converted to carry up to 7,250 fully equipped soldiers, accommodated in rows of four-tier bunks under relatively claustrophobic conditions. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)

 

Lifeboat drills were constantly practiced aboard Leviathan, whether bound for France or home to the United States. Fortunately for all concerned, no evacuation emergencies occurred during the troop ship’s wartime career. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
Lifeboat drills were constantly practiced aboard Leviathan, whether bound for France or home to the United States. Fortunately for all concerned, no evacuation emergencies occurred during the troop ship’s wartime career. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)

 

A view of the area forward of the bridge includes a look at Leviathan’s massive anchor chain. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
A view of the area forward of the bridge includes a look at Leviathan’s massive anchor chain. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Stephen Harding)
 

 

Refurbished at great expense to ocean liner configuration after the war, Leviathan sports the red, white, and blue smokestacks of the new United States Line as it resumes its civilian career in the 1920s. (Library of Congress)
Refurbished at great expense to ocean liner configuration after the war, Leviathan sports the red, white, and blue smokestacks of the new United States Line as it resumes its civilian career in the 1920s. (Library of Congress)

One Response

  1. Charles Callaway

    i have the navagational lights from the SS Leviathan purchased from the salvage company.I have copies of receipts and communication letters on the purchase before it was destroyed.I am interested in selling them.if interested send me an email at callaw_c@comcast.net….thanks Charles Callaway.

    Reply

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