Poetry Archives | HistoryNet

Poetry

  • MHQ Magazine

    Somme Song

    Mary Borden was born in 1886 with the proverbial silver spoon in her mouth: Her father, a prominent Chicago lawyer, had struck it rich as one of the lead investors in a fabulously successful silver-mining venture in Colorado. After...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Two Yeats-loving GIs met on a Vietnam mountaintop

    The first time I met Goodbody was on a high, mist-shrouded mountaintop in Hiep Duc Valley, southwest of Da Nang. It was 1968, and we were both in the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. A small landing zone had been slashed in a level spot near...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | What like a Bullet…

    Herman Melville (1819–1891) turned to poetry only after his serious fiction played to the literary equivalent of an empty house. Even Moby-Dick, the magisterial whaling story that for more than 100 years has been considered his magnum...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry: And Shells Go Crying Over Them—Voices of the Great War

    World War I spawned a generation of British soldier-poets whose verse took poetry in a raw new direction...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Letters from Readers- December 2007

    Elvis: Iconic or Immoral? The August 2007 issue certainly gave Elvis Presley a good going over, which should make all of his many loyal fans pleased. However, there is a segment of the population who, though not exactly antiElvis, do not...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Heading My Way

    Brian Turner earned a master of fine arts in poetry from the University of Oregon before serving for seven years in the U.S. Army. He deployed to Bosnia-Herzegovina with the 10th Mountain Division in 1999–2000 and then spent a year in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Home Alone

      I packed your seabag today: six pairs of pants, shirts folded in their rigid squares, your socks balled up like tan grenades. I put my photo in as well, laid it there between the Kevlar vest and heap of clothes. Don’t weep, the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Poet Bandit of Arizona Territory

    Daring rustler and train robber ‘Red’ McNeil taunted territorial lawmen with his written words. In early 1889, Pete Jacoby of Winslow, Arizona Territory, found the long-sought hideout of outlaw W.R. “Red” McNeil in a narrow canyon...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | AWOL

    Eugene J. McCarthy was born in Watkins, Minnesota, in 1916. He became an economics professor after earning a graduate degree from the University of Minnesota, but during World War II he enlisted in the U.S. Army and served as a code...

  • World War II Magazine

    The GI Who Found Brutal Poetry in War

    World War II had barely started when the British press began to loudly ask why this war had not yet produced any soldier poets, as the last war had. “Where are the war poets?” became such a familiar cry that in early 1941 the poet and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | The Fallen Volunteer

    A collection of Sorley’s poetry, Marlborough and Other Poems, was published posthumously in 1916. His last poem was discovered in his kit bag after his death....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ‘Shoot, if you must, this old gray head’

    Even if it didn’t happen, Barbara Fritchie’s is a darn good tale. An old woman of 90 leans from the attic window of her Frederick, Md., home, holding a bullet-rent United States flag, and defies the massed forces of Stonewall Jackson...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | To Fight Another Day

    In 1913, after working as a correspondent for the Toronto Star during the Balkan Wars, Service—by then widely known as “The Bard of the Yukon”—moved to Paris. He was 41 when World War I broke out. Turned down for military service,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Of Soldiers and Generals

    Li Bai (701–762) is widely regarded as China’s greatest poet. In 756 he became unofficial poet laureate to Prince Li Lin, the 16th of Emperor Xuanzong’s 30 sons, who tried to seize power in an unsuccessful uprising against the Tang...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: Groucho Marx Lectures T.S. Eliot About King Lear

    One day in 1961, Groucho Marx received a letter from a fan requesting an  autographed picture. The request didn’t surprise him but the source did. The letter came from T.S. Eliot, one of the 20th century’s greatest poets, winner...

  • AMERICA'S CIVIL WAR MAGAZINE

    5 Questions: A Voyage In Verse With Kevin Gallagher

    Boston-area poet offers a compelling look at what tore our nation apart By day, Kevin Gallagher is professor of global development policy at Boston University. In his off-hours, he writes poems, and his latest work, Loom, explores the...