Military History Archives

Military History

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: U.S. Intelligence and the Nazis

    U.S. Intelligence and the Nazis by Richard Breitman, Norman J.W. Goda, Timothy Naftali and Robert Wolfe;  Cambridge University Press, New York, 2005, $24.99 (softcover). In 1998 Congress enacted and President Bill Clinton signed the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Hell Is Upon Us

    Hell Is Upon Us: D-Day in the Pacific—June-August 1944 by Victor Brooks, Da Capo Press, Cambridge, Mass., 2005, $27.50. Operation Forager, the seizure of the Marianas Islands by U.S. forces in 1944, was significant in the Allies’ drive...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Blitzkrieg Legend

    The Blitzkrieg Legend: The 1940 Campaign in the West by Karl-Heinz Frieser, with John T. Greenwood; Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., 2005, $47.50. Case Yellow, the victorious German campaign in Western Europe in 1940, continues to...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Salamander: Bernard Freyberg

    To Winston Churchill, he was “the Salamander of the British Empire,” like the mythical creature that could pass through fire unharmed. To a subordinate, Major General Sir Howard Kippenberger, he was “simple as a child and cunning as...

  • World War II Magazine

    New Zealand’s Unknown Warriors

    When Lord Louis Mountbatten was named supreme Allied commander of the South East Asia Command (SEAC) in 1943, among his first decisions was to address the soldiers of the British Fourteenth Army in Burma, who felt so neglected they had...

  • World War II Magazine

    Sailing into the Unknown

    Choosing the uncertainty of an epic journey across 2,000 miles of enemy-controlled ocean rather than the ignominy of surrender, Lt. Cmdr. Jack Morrill and the crew of USS Quail escaped from the Philippines in a fragile 36-foot motor...

  • World War II Magazine

    In the Eye of the Tempest

    After narrowly surviving the Axis invasion of the Balkans in April 1941, New Zealander Haddon Donald and his men were evacuated to Crete. They soon found themselves at the dawn of a new era in warfare. The Germans had two goals when they...

  • World War II Magazine

    Blood for Dignity

    In March 1945, black volunteers forced the first breach in the U.S. Army’s color barrier. The American soldiers hemmed in on the east bank of the Rhine River were desperately protecting their tenuous Remagen bridgehead, resisting...

  • World War II Magazine

    Admiral Leahy: U.S. Ambassador to Vichy

    When Admiral William Daniel Leahy retired as U.S. chief of naval operations in August 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt awarded him the Distinguished Service Medal. “Bill,” the president said as he pinned the medal on the...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Dubious Distinction at Kassel

    Flying their B-24 Liberators in the flak-filled skies over Europe late in World War II, the men of the 445th Bombardment Group knew they were renowned among the Eighth Air Force for two primary reasons—one, their ranks included Hollywood...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Tale of Too Many Chiefs

    For the two opposing leaders battling for control of Biak’s vital airfields in the spring of 1944, the impatience and meddling of their superiors made the task of command more difficult than fighting the enemy. For a textbook example of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Absolute Destruction

    Absolute Destruction: Military Culture and the Practices of War in Imperial Germany Isabel V. Hull, (Cornell University Press, 2005), 384 pages, $24.95. Over the past twenty years, there has been a fundamental rethinking of a number of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Thucydides

    Thucydides: An Introduction for the Common Reader Perez Zagorin, (Princeton University Press, 2005), 190 pages, $24.95. The Peloponnesian War was fought, with a brief intermission about a third of the way in, for twenty-seven years, the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fighting Words: World War II

    Our lexicographer considers some words and phrases that sprang into use during World War II. During World War II, numerous new weapons and tactics originated. Some of them have died out, and others have survived. The Sten gun, a light...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Bay of Pigs: The Perfect Failure

    Forty-five years later, it’s still unclear who deserves the blame for the Bay of Pigs fiasco. The Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, among the most notorious of Central Intelligence Agency operations, also ranks as one of its most avowedly...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists On War: Portraying Maneuvers and Mock Battles

    Ever since armies first gathered to conquer and defend, soldiers have practiced their art, honing their martial skills in preparation for war. In medieval Europe, the tournament jousts, while entertaining, served the more important...