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Strategy

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Siege of Sarajevo

    The Bosnian capital of Sarajevo was the site of the most prominent siege of the Balkan wars that attended Yugoslavia’s disintegration in the early 1990s. On April 6, 1992, Serb forces began shelling the city from hillside positions and...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from Omdurman

    Following the 1885 fall of Khartoum and death of Maj. Gen. Charles George “Chinese” Gordon, the British resolved to deal with the Mahdi army in the Sudan. Finally, in the fall of 1898, Maj. Gen. Sir Herbert Kitchener led 8,200 British...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Mayaguez Incident

    U.S. military prestige was at an ebb in 1975. Its war in Vietnam had ended in defeat, and the Khmer Rouge had taken Phnom Penh and extended Cambodia’s territorial waters to 90 miles from shore. On May 12, Washington learned Khmer Rouge...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Siege of Vicksburg

    In early 1862, General Ulysses S. Grant, with help from the Western Gunboat Flotilla, captured Forts Henry and Donelson in Tennessee and then won a victory at Shiloh, allowing a Union siege of the Confederate bastion at Vicksburg, Miss....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Eyes of the Army

    Whether soaring at 30,000 feet or ‘dicing’ on the deck, the 10th Photo Reconnaissance Group got the pictures Allied planners needed. Compared with fighter jocks and bomber crews, pilots of the photoreconnaissance squadrons were among...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    World’s First Military Railroad

    To feed its hungry soldiers, the Confederacy constructed a railway with materiel captured by “Stonewall” Jackson. “Stonewall” Jackson was never one to overlook a military opportunity, so he jumped at the chance to seize railroad...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tactical Exercises: Fear the Phalanx

    The Macedonian formation terrified opponents— and at times overwhelmed the vaunted Roman legion. ONE DAY in late June 168 Rome and Macedon were encamped be- tween Mount Olympus and the port city BC, the armies of of Pydna in Macedonia....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tactical Exercises: Art of the Siege

    A Byzantine emperor’s military manual describes how psychological warfare can break the will of the enemy. Leo VI, the Byzantine emperor from AD 886 to 912, was an extraordinary armchair general. Though he probably never set foot on the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Death From Below

    In World War I, whole companies of men were assigned to burrow beneath enemy soldiers, then blow them sky high. They called themselves moles. Most were short, wiry men from the mines of Great Britain and Canada and Australia. Their special...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    On the Crossbow War’s Front Lines

    In 1962, the CIA, U.S. Special Forces and Vietnam’s Montagnard tribes were breaking new ground, developing counterinsurgency and unconventional warfare principles that live on today. Two hours after sunset, automatic weapons fire...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Vietnam Infantry Tactics

    Vietnam Infantry Tactics by Gordon L. Rottman, Osprey Publishing, 2011 With his previous service in the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam and subsequent airborne, long-range patrol and intelligence assignments in his 26 years in the U.S....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Book Review: Decisions at Gettysburg

    Decisions at Gettysburg: The Nineteen Critical Decisions That Defined the Campaign by Matt Spruill, University of Tennessee Press, 2011, $24.95 EVEN THOUGH HISTORIANS HAVE already spilled a veritable ocean of ink on the subject, new titles...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Tet Offensive

    The fall of Dien Bien Phu in 1954 led to peace talks in Geneva and the division of Vietnam into communist North and quasi-democratic South. Cold War tensions drew an ever-increasing commitment of U.S. troops and material support to the...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Moro Rebellion

    While the Moro Rebellion lasted roughly from 1903 to 1913, it’s perhaps more accurate to describe the insurgency by Muslim southern Filipinos—dubbed Moros by the Spanish—as a 600-year struggle for religious autonomy and independence...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from Mount Gilboa, 1006 BC

    The Israelite victory at Michmash Pass (1010 BC) sparked a popular uprising that ejected Philistine outposts from the Israelite hill country. Saul’s control of the foothills thwarted outright frontal assaults, so Philistine commanders...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Suez Crisis

    The nine-day Suez Crisis of 1956 was sparked by a series of what in hindsight seem playground-worthy disputes, though they could have led to global Armageddon. That year Egypt switched its allegiance from Western arms suppliers to the...