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Soldiers

  • World War II Magazine

    March of the Unknown Generals

    Two men with stars braved sniper fire on Guadalcanal, inspiring a couple of frightened young Marines. Occasionally during combat an incident occurs that one can recall with absolute clarity even decades later. For this Marine, that...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- August 2007

    The Airmen of the Fifteenth I served in the Fifteenth Air Force, 483rd Bomb Group, 815th Bomb Squadron, stationed at Foggia, Italy. Our B-17 Flying Fortress, named “Patches,” was shot down during our twelfth bombing mission over...

  • World War II Magazine

    Gunners at Arnhem

    The heroism of a little-known artillery unit staved off an even greater debacle at Arnhem. For all that the Battle of Arnhem has been analyzed, studied, and written about, one part of the story has received scant attention: the heroic role...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Young Marine at Tulagi

    A young marine comes of age on 31/2 square miles of island jungle in the Pacific. I know where I was a month ago, a year ago, or a decade ago, but I do know precisely where I was sixty-five years ago last August 8. On that date I was one...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Weapon GIs Hated Worst

    The Acht Acht was equally deadly against tanks and planes. The most famous cartoon characters of World War II were Bill Mauldin’s scruffy and unshaven soldiers Joe and Willie, who could always be counted on to capture the gripes, dreams,...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Soldier’s Death Far from the Field of Battle

    Thousands of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines lost their lives in World War II during training exercises, their sacrifices often over looked. On August 28, 1944, a woman in Quincy, Washington, Mrs. W. C. Grigg, witnessed one...

  • World War II Magazine

    First Blood for the Army Rangers at Dieppe

    The attack on Dieppe was a fiasco. But it was where the U.S. Special Forces were born. The Allied landing at Dieppe on the coast of France in August 1942 is scarcely mentioned in most accounts of World War II. When it is, it is called a...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Blood and Butchery in the Crimea

    Long months spent in the trenches during the siege of Sevastopol convinced a French lieutenant of war’s futility. Charles Duban was born in Dijon, France, in January 1827. His father was a Napoleonic war veteran who had left the army an...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Big Ben’s Fight for Life

    A Japanese bomber nearly sank USS Franklin in a March 1945 attack, but despite fires and explosions that killed a third of the seamen, its determined captain and crew kept the carrier afloat. Off the coast of Japan on March 19, 1945, USS...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    When James Brown Brought the House Down

    Ever since 1968, I have been meaning to compose a letter to the Godfather of Soul that begins something like this: Dear Mr. James Brown, First, I want to thank you for coming to Vietnam and performing for the soldiers at Long Binh. Second,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letter from the Editor- April 2008

    The Soldier’s Dilemma Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain knew a thing or two about war and human nature. The university professor from Maine, turned self-taught soldier, became one of America’s great military heroes, receiving the Medal of...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Thomas Creek, Medal of Honor in Vietnam

    Tom Creek was born on April 7, 1950, in Joplin, Missouri. He was the second of the three sons of Ross and Bobbie Creek, and with brothers Ross Jr. and Roy grew up in a struggling family that did not rise above poverty during Tom’s...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Ribbons on a GI’s uniform

    As I was walking my boxer named Corporal one day, I decided it was time to put down on paper some of the things I’ve had running through my mind about serving in Vietnam. While this will mainly interest those who know something about...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letters from Readers- April 2008

    Dak To Defenders I want to personally thank Vietnam Magazine, and my friend author Ed Murphy, for his excellent account of the 299th Combat Engineers’ defense of Dak To (December 2007). During the course of the entire war, the Dak To...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A Minor Rebellion

    The scene is a familiar one. A column of American GIs, hunched over from the weight of 80 pound rucksacks, warily works its way through a miasma of dense green foliage, rifles at the ready. Their frightened eyes peer from masks of dust and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    ‘Smelling the Enemy’

    Long after the fact, a commander learns that his battlefield intuition deep in a Vietnam jungle was right—and saved many lives. When experienced combat commanders say that something “doesn’t pass the smell test,” they usually know...