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Soldiers

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    ‘Ethiopia’ On Broadway

    New York City women tried to erase the memory of the Draft Riots by helping raise a U.S. Colored Troops regiment. On March 5, 1864, “a vast crowd” of 100,000 New Yorkers “of every shade of color, and every phase of social and...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Dog Company

    Dog Company: The Boys of Pointe du Hoc By Patrick K. O’Donnell. 320 pp. Da Capo, 2012. $26.  On June 6, 1984, Ronald Reagan’s rousing 40th anniversary speech on the cliffs of Normandy’s Pointe du Hoc thrust World War II’s...

  • World War II Magazine

    Letters from Readers- World War II August 2013

    Familiar Face A COMMENT on the March/April cover: The tank commander looks very much like a young Robert Taylor to the point I thought it was a movie shot! Just wondering if anyone else thinks so. GREG VANDERZEE LAKE LUZERNE, N.Y. We do!...

  • World War II Magazine

    Breaking Point: Why Do Soldiers Desert?

    Legendary lapses alone do not explain why thousands of men deserted their posts. The untold stories are the important ones. By his own admission, Eddie Slovik was the unluckiest man alive. Nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British...

  • HistoryNet

    Australian Soldiers, 1914-45

    Aussies fought some of the toughest battles in two world wars. The list of battles fought by Australian soldiers reads like an honor roll of the toughest fighting of World Wars I and II: Gallipoli (1915), the Somme (1916), Ypres (1917),...

  • HistoryNet

    Steel Pot: The Combat Helmet

    Separating fact from fiction about the origin of the modern combat helmet. THE SOLDIER AND THE SOUP BOWL … The story goes like this: When World War I began in August 1914, no soldiers in any army wore helmets, since such headgear had...

  • HistoryNet

    French Poilus, 1914-18

    France’s World War I infantrymen bore the brunt of Allied fighting in horrific Western Front trench warfare. “Poilu” (“hairy one”), the nickname for a French army infantryman, dates back to Napoleonic times, but it is most often...

  • HistoryNet

    British Army Gurkhas

    Nepalese soldiers proved to be the British army’s “bravest of the brave.” “If a man says he is not afraid of dying, he is either lying or he is a Gurkha.” This judgment by Indian army Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, who as a...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A Sergeant’s Prayer Is Answered

    The cavalry came to the rescue at Loc Ninh. Lieutenant Ed Knoll was awakened by his foot being gently pushed, the cautious and safe method of waking someone in combat. A handset was shoved in his face, and the radio telephone operator...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Common Men, Uncommon Valor

    “Everything around you is just riddled with shrapnel. You see that right away. There isn’t anything that isn’t torn open; sandbags are ripped open, buildings are just shredded.” That’s how former Marine Ron Rees describes the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    DMZ Turkey Shoot

    U.S. Marine tanks and ARVN troops unload on a North Vietnamese battalion. One of the most devastating defeats inflicted upon the North Vietnamese Army by U. S. Marines and their South Vietnamese allies occurred on Aug. 15, 1968, in the...

  • HistoryNet

    U.S. Navy Seabees

    Great Warriors are not limited to those whose primary mission is to close with and destroy the enemy. Waging modern warfare demands a total team effort by combat, support and service units working closely together to project the power of...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Voices | Maj. Gen. James Jackson

    Out of 9 million U.S. veterans who served worldwide during the Vietnam War, 7 million are still living. It’s retired Maj. Gen. James Jackson’s job to make sure the country honors them during the war’s 50th anniversary. In May 2015...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Night Jump into Dien Bien Phu

    Pierre Fauroux was born in 1921. He graduated from the French Military Academy at St. Cyr in 1942, when France’s Vichy government was dominated by Germany. In 1943 he escaped from France via Spain and joined the Free French movement...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Lost Patrol

    Outnumbered and outgunned, Marines courageously fought for their lives on a killing ground near Da Nang. At 6:30 in the morning on May 12, 1966, a 14-man reinforced squad from Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, left the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Voices | Walt Sides, Rolling Thunder

    In 1973, when the first prisoners of war were freed by North Vietnam and returned to the United States, many veterans believed that the actual number of POWs was much higher. One of those veterans was Walt Sides, a gold medal marksman in...