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Cold War

  • Military History Magazine

    MADness of the Cold War

    How crazy was the Cold War doctrine of mutually assured destruction? Turns out, it was a surprisingly good idea. Few concepts in military strategy are more puzzling than the notion of mutually assured destruction. More than frightening, it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Tin Triangle Tales

    Fast, agile and futuristic, the RAF’s Avro Vulcan nuclear bomber left an indelible impression on the crewmen who flew it during the Cold War. The sleek, delta-wing bomber lands in the ocean, then slowly sinks to the bottom—part of a...

  • American History Magazine

    Comrade Khrushchev’s American Road Trip

    In the summer of 1959, President Dwight Eisenhower invited Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to a summit at Camp David. Khrushchev accepted, adding that he’d like to travel around America for “ten to 15 days.” The trip was...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms of Armageddon

    How close did the world come to destroying itself in the 100 years following “the war to end all wars”?...

  • Military History Magazine

    The End Was Near

    New information about the Cuban Missile Crisis shows just how close we came to nuclear Armageddon. It was one minute before high noon on Oct. 27, 1962, the day that later became known as “Black Saturday.” More than 100,000 American...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Style Over Substance

    Lockheed’s XF-90 embodied the rakish appearance of an early jet fighter, but its sleek exterior hid a host of shortcomings. Created by the famous Lockheed “Skunk Works” and heavily publicized as the U.S. Air Force’s next fighter,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Britain’s Javelin Misses the Mark

    The RAF’s only delta-wing fighter was also Gloster’s swan song. “A loud bang followed by a shroud of black acrid smoke billowing from beneath the aircraft” is how one airman described an engine start on a Gloster Javelin, the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Project Tip-Tow

    The “floating wingtip” concept led to Cold War experiments that had pilots tip-towing on the verge of disaster. The history of aviation is full of ideas that seemed ingenious when first pro- posed but failed in practice. These notions...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Everyman’s Gun- The AK-47

    How Cold War politics made the AK-47 the world’s most ubiquitous gun. Plus—Fidel, Saddam, and the history of automatic weapons. One weapon alone has been a consistent presence in modern war: the infantry rifle. Tanks can rout...

  • American History Magazine

    President vs. Press: How JFK tried to stop the news 

    The battle for freedom of the press is a tale as old as time—for two major news networks in 1962, it meant taking on the president...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    “Ekranoplan,” the Soviet Union’s Flying Ships

    Russian dreams of gigantic ground-effect planes are dead in the water. The story of modern transportation is littered with vehicles that were supposed to be game-changers but that invariably became yet more deposits in the dustbin of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience | The Insurgent

    In 1991, after years of fighting, Ukraine finally gained independence from the Soviet Union. So did Dmytro Verholjak...

  • HistoryNet

    The Forest Brothers Against the Soviets

    From 1944-53, Lithuanian partisans risked their lives to oppose repressive Soviet occupation. From the end of World War II through the early years of the Cold War, thousands of Lithuania’s sons and a few of its daughters disappeared into...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Field of Blackbirds, Kosovo

    The Balkans remain a ground of contention where the past is never dead. As the Cold War ended in the late 1980s, the Yugoslavia of the late Communist strongman Josip Broz Tito descended into a series of civil wars and then finally broke...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Atomic Airships

    Nuclear-powered airships seemed like a good idea during the Cold War, but for a variety of reasons—some self-evident—they never got off the ground. For the first half of the 20th century, atomic-powered airships were the stuff of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fox Two!

    The heatseeking AIM-9 Sidewinder went from a laboratory exercise to the preeminent air combat weapon of the jet age. The Cold War flared hot on August 23, 1958, when Communist China bombarded Matsu and Quemoy, islands of the Nationalist...