Science & Engineering Archives

Science & Engineering

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Giving the Machine Gun Wings

    On April 1, 1915, Roland Garros took off in a Morane-Saulnier L from an airfield in northern France, planning to play an April Fool’s Day trick on the Germans....

  • American History Magazine

    Father of Emergency Medicine

    Jonathan Letterman’s Civil War innovations revolutionized military and civilian trauma care. In July 1861, after the First Battle of Bull Run, with about 5,000 soldiers dead or wounded, it took almost a week to remove Union and...

  • American History Magazine

    An Alaskan Village Holds the Key to Understanding the 1918 Spanish Flu

    In August 1997, a scientist named Johan Hultin from San Francisco traveled to Brevig Mission and, with permission of the town’s elders, excavated the local cemetery to try and unearth a victim of the outbreak buried deep within the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Build Your Own: Bristol F.2B

    When the Bristol Company’s F.2A made its World War I debut over the Western Front on April 5, 1917, German fighters had a field day. Of the six British aircraft from No. 48 Squadron that entered the fray, four were shot down in quick...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Fighter Built for Two

    After a calamitous combat debut, the Bristol Fighter became a formidable mainstay of the Royal Air Force during World War I— and into the 1930s. Any discussion of World War I air combat usually brings to mind the image of nimble...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The ‘Convertible’ Columbia Triad

    The list of aviation heroes America has taken to heart is endless, from the Wright brothers down to present-day military pilots. The United States has a penchant for adventure-lovers, and has embraced the smiling, clean-living,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Build You Own: Fw-190A-4

    In the early fall pilots reported the first appearance of a of 1941, British Spitfire new German fighter accompanying formations of Messerschmitt Me-109s over northern Europe. That fighter, which eventually became known as the Focke Wulf...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Hurel-Dubois and Maurice Hurel

    Since the first bird-watching human thought of trying a little flying of his own, the idea of wings has fascinated mankind. Through myth and magic, from Daedalus through the “Hawk Men” of Flash Gordon, avid inventors have repeatedly...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Vintage Flyers II

    Vintage Flyers II by Eric Presten, Prewar Publications,Vineburg, Calif., 2005, $84.95. Every once in a while, a picture book comes along that is an unexpected treat. Eric Presten’s beautifully produced 478-page Vintage Flyers II is a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Quest for a Long-Range Bomber

    As far back as 1920, the fledging Air Service branch of the U.S. Army perceived the need for a truly long-range bomber force that was capable of reaching far beyond the enemy’s lines to attack his means of supply and production. Early...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Superbombers

    The U.S. military was convinced in 1941 that an intercontinental bomber was desperately needed. In mid-941, it looked as if the Axis powers might sweep over the entire Eurasian landmass. The Germans had been stopped at the English Channel...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Last Deadly Gale from Japan

    The Nakajima Ki.84 was the Japanese army’s best fighter of World War II—and could have been even better with more trained pilots and a higher grade of fuel. On the morning of January 7, 1945, four Lockheed P-38L Lightnings of the Fifth...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The LACAB GR.8: Jack of All Trades

    The concept of the general-purpose fighter—a long-range, heavily armed airplane capable of achieving air superiority while at the same time shouldering other tasks such as bombing and reconnaissance—came into vogue with the development...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Costly Assault Vehicle

    The crucible of World War II displayed the glider’s potential—and revealed its limitations. Although the glider was among the earliest forms of aircraft, its military possibilities were not explored until the 1930s and not put to real...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Alfred Lawson: Visionary or Crackpot?

    The eccentric self-declared designer who masterminded America’s first airliner left behind a baffling legacy. You won’t find Alfred William Lawson mentioned in many history books, but he was an early aviation visionary who claimed...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MAC-1 Designer Howell Miller

    In the early 1930s, Gee Bees became synonymous with speed when the bullet-shaped racers blazed a winning trail at Cleveland. Yet the beautiful planes with their gleaming red-and-white finish soon acquired reputations as pilot killers. And...