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  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Down in the Trenches, Smeared With Blood

    Seventeen years ago, in a spirited and widely reprinted article, Mark E. Neely Jr. sought to refute the notion that the Civil War had been a “total war.” Ever since then, Neely writes in his most recent book, The Civil War and the...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Third Reich, at Length

    In a recently completed 12,000-page work, German scholars take a long unblinking look at Nazi Germany in World War II. One of the greatest projects ever undertaken in the field of military history began in the mid-1970s when Germany’s...

  • American History Magazine

    Is a Generational War Coming?

    The Coming Generational Storm: What You Need to Know About America’s Economic Future by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Scott Burns Economist Laurence Kotlikoff and his co-author, Scott Burns, warn of a “God-awful storm” when the boomer...

  • American History Magazine

    Can We Come to Terms With China?

    The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China’s War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900 by Diana Preston The 1900 uprising against foreigners in China—led by a society of martial artists secretly encouraged by...

  • Ask Mr. History

    Any Recommendations for a Reconstruction Book?

    Dear Sir/Madam,  I have been reading your America’s Civil War for years and love it.  Would you please recommend a book on Reconstruction that is not completely slanted to the North or the South’s perspective for...

  • American History Magazine

    How Respect for Bankers Turns to Hate

    Financial Founding Fathers: The Men Who Made America Rich by Robert E. Wright and David J. Cowen Wright and Cowen capture the grand visions and often bitter public disappointments of Alexander Hamilton and other early financiers. In 1825,...

  • American History Magazine

    Is a Quest for Bipartisanship Doomed?

    Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 by John Ferling The founding fathers believed that political parties would bring instability to the republic. Yet by the time George Washington left the presidency, petty bickering had...

  • American History Magazine

    What Spawns Homegrown Terror?

    To Purge This Land With Blood: A Biography of John Brown by Stephen B. Oates John Brown, the original homegrown American terrorist, combined deep distrust of the federal government with a belief that slavery was a national sin that must be...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: Book Printed in America

    For the flock of Puritans who founded Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630, a physical break from the Church of England wasn’t enough. A group of “pious and learned ministers” took it on themselves to translate the Book of Psalms from...

  • American History Magazine

    Can Big Oil Be Kept in Line?

    The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money and Power by Daniel Yergin Yergin explores the uneasy ties between Big Oil and Big Government in his sweeping history of the petroleum industry. In the 1904 presidential campaign, for example,...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Everything You Need to Know About Artillery

    The Author: John Gibbon, the first commander of the famous “Iron Brigade” of Midwestern regiments, ended the war as a major general commanding the XXIV Corps. He had spent many prewar years serving as an instructor of artillery at West...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Making Sense of All That Paperwork

    The Author: Born in Baden, Germany, August V. Kautz settled in Ohio with his family when he was an infant. Fighting in the Mexican War helped get him an appointment to West Point in 1848. After graduation, he was assigned to small outposts...

  • American History Magazine

    Interview with Tom Wolfe, the man in white

    The country had reason to cheer on May 5, 1961, when Freedom 7 splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean carrying its precious cargo: Alan Shepard, the first American to go into space. After years of being bested by the Soviet Union, the United...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Land of Contradiction

    In the prewar South a Yankee traveler discovered a world best rendered in shades of gray. Frederick Law Olmsted is best known as the visionary behind such green space masterworks as Central Park, the grounds of the U.S. Capitol and...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Reading List: Stephen Budiansky

    The Making of the Atomic Bomb Richard Rhodes (1986) “By far the most complete history of the Manhattan Project, this is also a profound exploration of the sprawling interconnections between war, science, and society in the modern world....

  • Ask Mr. History

    Recommendations for Books on the Moors?

    Could you please tell me the names of some good history books that talk about the Moors?  I am interested in learning how the Moors and the Muslims interacted. Thanks Judy   ???   Dear Judy,   There are lots of books...