Ancient Rome Archives

Ancient Rome

  • Military History Magazine

    Rebel with a Lost Cause

    Exiled Roman commander Quintus Sertorius waged a guerrilla-style civil war in Hispania, where time proved his greatest enemy...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: The Fall of the Roman Empire

    The Fall of the Roman Empire Peter J. Heather, (Oxford University Press, 2006), $40. In 375, the Roman Empire appeared as strong and secure as it had been in its four-hundred-year history. The empire extended from the ramparts of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Rebellion Rocks the Western Empire

    Eastern Emperor Constantius II waged a costly war of revenge against his brother’s killer, Magnentius, seriously weakening the Roman Empire on the eve of the Goth invasions. Of the many civil wars that periodically convulsed the late...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Battle of Cannae

    In 216 BC Rome mobilized a force of 86,000 legionaries and auxiliaries under consuls Lucius Aemilius  Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro and sent them against some 50,000 men under the great Carthaginian general Hannibal. The Roman...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: Are We Rome?

    Are We Rome? The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America by Cullen Murphy, Houghton Mifflin, New York, 2007, $24.  The quick answer to the question in the title of Murphy’s sparkling and erudite book is a resounding maybe. As he...

  • Military History Book Reviews

    Book Review: The Rise of Rome

    Kathryn Lomas takes in the broader Italian context to understand how the ancient city-state rose to dominate the peninsula...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Review: Rome and the Barbarians

    “Rome and the Barbarians” Through July 20, 2008, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, Italy www.palazzograssi.it/roma Barbarian. The very word conjures images of invading hordes. Ruthless foreigners bent on pillaging. Savages absent culture. Yet as...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Fisherman: Catching Spartacus

    A Roman general sets his nets to catch Spartacus at Bruttium. It was a winter morning in the mountains of southern Italy, in early 71 BC. Normally it was silent at this time of year, when even the herdsmen had left for lower ground. On...

  • MHQ Magazine

    ‘This Frightful Catastrophe’

    In defeating the Roman army, a Teutonic prince turned the tide of modern history...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Julian’s Gamble in the Desert

    Inspired by Alexander the Great, the Roman emperor set out to conquer Persia with a massive army, a bold plan, and a thirst for glory. One day in early April, stood on an earthen mound and looked out upon a magnificent array of military...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The End of Athens

    A demagogue, a treacherous ally, and a brutal Roman general destroyed the city-state—and democracy—in the first century BC. Two scenes from Athens in the first century BC: Early summer, 88 BC A cheering crowd surrounds the envoy...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Roman Folly at Edessa

    Treachery has often had a decisive impact on military operations. Great generals have founded tactical and even strategic plans upon it—and with good reason. Assassinations, betrayals and defections, if timed properly, can turn the...

  • HistoryNet

    Julius Caesar at War

    Charismatic leadership and brilliant tactics gained Caesar an empire and made him ruler of Rome. PHARSALUS, GREECE, 48 B.C. For several days, Julius Caesar had watched the army of his fellow Roman but bitter enemy Pompey (Gnaeus Pompeius...

  • Military History Magazine

    Rome Ravaged

    In 1527 the eternal city learned what happens when a leaderless, out-of-control army runs amok. It was not the metaphorical “fog of war” but actual fog that rolled up the Tiber River early on May 6, 1527, and it made all the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Making the Rules of War

    From ancient origins the informal rules of war have developed into a complex code designed to curb man’s lawless violence. But does it work? All’s fair in love and war. In love, perhaps—in war almost never. Despite the impression...

  • Military History Magazine

    His Own Worst Enemy

    Mark Antony’s victories and political alliances with Julius Caesar and Octavian set his star on the rise—until Cleopatra pulled down the shades. Marcus Antonius (83–30 bc) would have been no one’s pick to become a great leader of...