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FEATURES

Radical Luftwaffe Weapons
By Walter J. Boyne
Some seemingly far-fetched aircraft designs abandoned by Germany at WWII’s end might have succeeded if developers hadn’t run out of time.

Filling Stations in the Sky
By Jay Wertz
The aerial ballet that is in-flight refueling has never been more important than in today’s tumultuous world.

Streamline Revolution
By Richard P. Hallion
Through its cutting-edge research efforts at Caltech, the Douglas Aircraft Company transformed global air transport.

Another Italian Misadventure
By C.G. Sweeting
Mussolini’s ill-equipped Corpo Aereo Italiano suffered a string of mishaps and defeats in the Battle of Britain.

Gyrocopter Queen
By Kay Haugaard
At age 80, Marion Springer is celebrating her comeback in the rotorcraft world.

DEPARTMENTS
Mailbag

Briefing

Milestones
By Nan Siegel

Aviators
By David T. Zabecki
No one can doubt Yiftah Spector’s courage.

Restored
By Larry Smith
TLC for a venerable A-26 Invader.

Extremes
By Stephan Wilkinson
Heinkel’s mythical He-113 super-fighter.

 

 

Letter From Aviation History

Flashback
By Warren M. Bodie
A prototype P-38 Lightning.

Reviews

Airware
By Bernard Dy
Flight Sims Wings of Victory and World at War.

Flight Test
By Jon Guttman

Aero Poster

 

ONLINE EXTRAS

Discussion:

German engineers designed a number of technologically advanced aircraft in the waning months of World War II, but time ran out for the Luftwaffe before most “wonder weapons” could be produced. If Germany had focused on jet technology and other advances earlier, would it have made a difference in the war’s outcome?