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World War II

  • Aviation History Magazine

    WWII Around the Globe

    Take control in the East and West, on the surface and in the air. There’s considerable ground to cover when re-creating World War II aviation, but a pair of strategy games manage to do a fairly good job of it. Battlestations Pacific...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Big Show

    The Big Show by Pierre Clostermann Published in 1951 and revised in 2006, Pierre Clostermann’s memoir of aerial combat was one of the first to emerge from WWII. Reflecting the perceptions of an extremely opinionated French volunteer in...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Reviews: Luftwaffe

    In the Skies of France: A Chronicle of JG 2 “Richthofen,” Volume I, 1934-1940 by Erik Mombeeck and Jean-Louis Roba, with Chris Goss, ASBL, Linkebeek, Belgium, 2009, $74. Storming the Bombers: A Chronicle of JG 4, The Luftwaffe’s 4th...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Return to Gordisa

    In his twilight years, a WWII tail-gunner relives the perils of his youth and takes home a powerful memento. Secured in his tail-gunner position at the rear of a Consolidated B-24 Liberator, 20-year-old Sergeant Francis J. Lashinsky was...

  • CIVIL WAR TIMES MAGAZINE

    Longstreet’s Second Lady

    Lieutenant General James Longstreet's remarkable second wife defended her husband’s reputation, championed black rights, and built World War II bombers...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Build Your Own “Arizona” Kingfisher

    Until recently, about the only place to find a Vought OS2U King­fisher model was at model club swap meets. Then Revell USA reissued its Mono­gram Models 1/48th-scale kit of the floatplane (#6907), which is simple and inexpensive, with...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Pacific Blitz

    A B-29 pilot recalls battling weather fronts, fighters and flak to rain fire on Japanese cities. The crew soon realized the searchlight battery was actually emplaced halfway up 12,000-foot-high Mount Fuji, right at their 6,000- to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo

    Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Captain Ted W. Lawson On April 18, 1942, Americans got some very welcome news: 16 North American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers had raided Tokyo and four other major Japanese cities in retaliation for the attack...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Northrop’s Night Hunter

    Northrop’s Night Hunter: P-61 Black Widow by Jeff Kolln, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $39.95. Unquestionably the finest Allied night fighter of World War II, the Northrop P-61 Black Widow entered service in 1944 and served...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Japan’s Fleet of Flying Forts

    In late May 1945, U.S. Army Air Forces intelligence officers were intrigued by the results of a photoreconnaissance sweep over an airfield near Tokyo. Clearly visible in photos of Tachikawa, home base for Japan’s Army Aviation Technical...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Harbinger of a New Era

    Willy Messerschmitt’s Me-262 was not quite the game changer it might have been if produced earlier and in greater numbers, but after its 1944 debut, air combat would never be the same. On the morning of August 27, 1939, a new era dawned...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    FW 200 Condor vs Atlantic Convoy 1941-43

    FW 200 Condor vs Atlantic Convoy 1941-43 by Robert Forczyk, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, England, 2010, $17.95. Up to now, the formula behind Osprey’s successful series of “Duel” books has usually been to compare two contemporary...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Freedom Flyers

    Freedom Flyers: The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II  by J. Todd Moye, Oxford University Press, 2010, $24.95.  In this well-written history of the pioneering African-American pilots and ground crews who fought for liberty abroad...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Eyes of the Army

    Whether soaring at 30,000 feet or ‘dicing’ on the deck, the 10th Photo Reconnaissance Group got the pictures Allied planners needed. Compared with fighter jocks and bomber crews, pilots of the photoreconnaissance squadrons were among...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Day Hitler Got Cold Feet

    During an impromptu flight to the Russian Front, the Führer was forced to forgo the comforts of his usual transport. On a frigid day in early December 1941, Adolf Hitler paced back and forth in the situation room at Wolfsschanze in East...

  • Aviation History magazine

    Building your own Martin PBM-5 Mariner

    Aviation historians generally agree that if it had not been for the Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Martin PBM-5 Mariner would have been considered the most famous flying boat of World War II. Model kits of Mariners are rare birds, mostly...