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World War II

  • World War II Magazine

    Teddy Suhren’s Last Patrol

    Long-lost photographs document the final mission of a U-boat rebel. At 9:30 p.m. on July 9, 1942, the German submarine U-564 slipped out of the harbor at Brest, on the northwest coast of France. It was based there in a cavernous bunker...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- February 2010

    More Than a Machine Ronald H. Bailey’s “The Incredible Jeep” was extremely interesting and obviously well researched (September 2009). He comments that GIs and generals alike considered the jeep practically indestructible! Well, I...

  • American History Magazine

    Last Train Home

    After World War II, fallen American service personnel rode the rails to their resting places. ...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: The Saboteur

    Playing more like an action-adventure movie than a video game, The Saboteur puts you into the driving shoes of Sean Devlin, an Irish expatriate and saboteur based on real-life war hero William Grover-Williams—a Grand Prix– winning...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: At the Smithsonian’s Aviation Annex, Excitement Is In the Air

    Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Chantilly, Virginia nasm.si.edu/udvarhazy It sure looks big enough as you walk toward it through acres of parking. But once you’re inside, big becomes astounding. Its...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Rommel’s Desert War

    Rommel’s Desert War: Waging World War II in North Africa, 1941–1943 By Martin Kitchen. 616 pp. Cambridge University Press, 2009. $38. Arguably the most provocative reassessment of this theater in many a year, this challenging, rich,...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Hitler’s Panzers

    Hitler’s Panzers: The Lightning Attacks That Revolutionized Warfare By Dennis Showalter. 400 pp. Berkley, 2009. $25.95. The German army’s blitzkrieg and the tanks that carried it out have an almost mythological place in military...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Hell to Pay

    Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945–47 By D. M. Giangreco. 363 pp. Naval Institute Press, 2009. $36.95. Readers of military history who seek tales of heroism in battle and the excitement of decisive maneuver...

  • World War II Magazine

    This Strange Britisher’: Orde Wingate in Ethiopia

    Eccentric guerrilla warfare pioneer Orde Wingate helped the British drive the Italians out of Ethiopia in 1941. It was the moment Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie had dreamed of since Benito Mussolini’s army had taken over Addis Ababa...

  • World War II Magazine

    Spy Class 101

    In an obscure corner of Canada, British secret agents introduced American operatives to warfare’s dark arts. On November 21, 1941, the SS Pasteur, a former French luxury liner now stripped of its finery and ferrying raw materials and men...

  • World War II Magazine

    Gung Ho: The Makin Raid’s Strange Legacy

    In August 1942, marine special forces raided a tiny Pacific atoll. Little was gained and much was lost. So why does the legacy of the Makin Raid live on? Two hundred marines swarmed onto the decks of the submarines USS Nautilus and USS...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- April 2010

    The Next Great Mission I was compelled to comment on Rick Atkinson’s article in the November 2009 issue (“What is Lost?”). We are losing veterans daily and many of their stories go untold. My father was in the army, 28th Infantry...

  • World War II Magazine

    Strange Fortune

    An American sub at the Battle of Midway finds that luck can be a powerful weapon. By the time the USS Tambor departed from Pearl Harbor on May 21, 1942, to battle the Japanese, Robert R. Hunt, torpedo- man second class, had already...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man Who Would Be Ike

    What if Frank Andrews had survived his 1943 air crash? The American president’s personal airport is named for him. Gen. George C. Marshall referred to him as the only potential commander of Operation Overlord that he “had a chance to...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Storm Before the Storm

    Hundreds of thousands of troops were primed for the world’s largest amphibious operation. One man had the lonely burden of setting it all in motion. The final countdown to the D-Day landings at Normandy began on June 2, 1944, when Gen....

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- June 2010

    Fond Memories of a Fallen Hero Your article “The Horticulturalist Who Got the Best of Bombs” (January/February 2010) brought back memories of my youth and stories I had heard from my family about the war. In the 1920s my uncle—my...