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World War II

  • World War II Magazine

    Book Review: Armor and Blood- The Battle of Kursk

    Armor and Blood: The Battle of Kursk By Dennis E. Showalter. 368 pp. Random House, 2013. $28. On July 5, 1943, the German summer offensive, Operation Citadel, finally kicked off after many delays. The elite units of the Soviet and German...

  • World War II Magazine

    Book Review: Dogs of War

    Dogs of War By Sheila Keenan and Nathan Fox. 208 pp. Scholastic, 2013. $12.99. This well-executed graphic novel, based on real war stories about canine escapades of derring-do, is really three tales about World War I, World War II, and...

  • World War II Magazine

    Dirty Deeds Done Deceptively

    Before he lived it, spy novelist Dennis Wheatley wrote it. Few nations have used deception in war- time as effectively as Britain. During World War II, British hoodwinking enjoyed repeated success, even helping to make the invasion of...

  • World War II Magazine

    Flak House Days

    A bombardier recalls dark times in the flak fields, and the haven that brightened his life. No soldier would deliberately run into an artillery barrage, but for those of us in bombers, flying into flak—from Fliegerabwehrkanone, German...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Psychiatrist and the Nazi

    An American doctor trying to plumb the depths of evil found a strange kinship instead. In August 1945, an ambitious U.S. Army psychiatrist, Douglas M. Kelley, received a plum assignment: a rendezvous with the men widely regarded as the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Wooden Boats at War: Surigao Strait

    When the Imperial Japanese Navy swept into Surigao Strait, PT boats were the first to strike. AT ITS WIDEST, THE 50-MILE-LONG SURIGAO Strait separates the Philippine islands of Leyte and Dinagat by a mere 14 miles. To sailors aboard three...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: Freedom’s Cost, Measured in Emptiness

    IN TYNEHAM, ON ENGLAND’S south coast, abandoned stone houses stand in roofless rows. Their gutted, weedy interiors suggest war’s aftermath, but the only aggressor here has been time, grinding away since the last villager left in...

  • World War II Magazine

    Fire for Effect: Getting Lucky at Remagen

    WAR IS NEVER EASY, and sometimes victory requires a lucky break. Think about that moment in March 1945 when the U.S. Army managed to seize a bridge over the Rhine—a major river and an operational obstacle of the first order. No one on...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Monuments Men Man: Conversation with Robert M. Edsel

    FOR A DECADE, Robert Edsel has avidly delved into how the Allied Armies’ Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Section (MFAA) protected and preserved Europe’s cultural treasures during the war, then found, catalogued, and helped return...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Reading List: Bob Balaban

     Hiroshima John Hersey (1946) “This is a great book. It’s beautifully written and researched, and hugely significant historically: it forced the world to contemplate the devastation of the bombing, and humanized and universalized...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today – February 2014

    Search for Lost Bomber Enlists Underwater Robot Every year, Pat Scannon, a physician and biotech entrepreneur, travels across the Pacific to search on and around Palau for planes downed during World War II. Scannon isn’t really a...

  • World War II Magazine

    Letters from Readers- World War II February 2014

    Happy to See Hap YOUR SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER feature regarding General Hap Arnold and our country’s stubborn reluctance to recognize the power of aircraft in wartime certainly rang a bell with me. My brother Norton, an enlisted man in the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: Yanks in Cambridge

    KNOWN FOR ITS UNIVERSITY AND SOARING GOTHIC MASTERPIECES, Cambridge, England, has much to offer visitors seeking antiquity and spectacle. Established in 1209, the campus occupies the center of town, where a maze of narrow streets winds its...

  • World War II Magazine

    Battle Films: The Moral World of Twelve O’Clock High

    TWELVE O’CLOCK HIGH, celebrated film about the air war over Europe, shows barely any a justly high-altitude violence. Even so, director Henry King and his actors expertly illuminate the complex burden of commanding personnel engaged...

  • World War II Magazine

    TV Series Review: Nazi Hunters

    Nazi Hunters Time: 60 minutes each. 8 episodes. National Geographic Channel. This interesting, well-wrought new series doesn’t limit its notion of Nazi hunters to postwar pursuers of fugitives. Of course, it includes episodes on infamous...

  • World War II Magazine

    Book Review: Hanns and Rudolf

    Hanns and Rudolf: The True Story of the German Jew Who Tracked Down and Caught the Kommandant of Auschwitz By Thomas Harding. 348 pp. Simon & Schuster, 2013. $26. The ironic trajectories of lives displaced and entangled by World War II...