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Women’s History

  • American History Magazine

    The Devil’s Advance Agent

    Women in the 1890s boldly ignored warnings that riding a bicycle could lead to their damnation. In 1896, as the horse-and-buggy era drew to a close, newspaper offices across the country received an impassioned broadside from Charlotte...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Stealing Secrets

    Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals, Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War H. Donald Winkler, Cumberland House The Civil War is full of tales of deception practiced by enterprising femmes fatales...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    ‘Bread or Blood’

    Armed women took to the streets to protest against Confederate injustice. On the morning of March 18, 1863, about 20 women, headed by a tall woman with a determined look, began moving through the downtown streets of Atlanta. They stopped...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Letters from Readers- August 2011

    Gettysburg Monuments I loved Kim O’Connell’s June 2011 article about the best and worst Gettysburg monuments. While I heartily agree that the Irish Brigade monument is one of the best, for me the most poignant is the “Friend to...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- February 2011

    Postscript, Please I have been a subscriber to World War II magazine since its inception. I  enjoyed the September/October issue, but do have a complaint. I want to know what happened to the individuals in your articles after the war....

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Kids Stuff: Women Heroes and Phantoms in the Snow

    Women Heroes of World War II By Kathryn Atwood. 272 pp. Chicago Review Press, 2011. $19.95. The 26 women in this well-written collection of short biographical essays faced off against the Nazis in one form or another as part of the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Beautiful Assassin

    Beautiful Assassin  By Michael White. 480 pp. Harper Perennial, 2011. $15.99.  Snipers are inherently romantic figures. They reduce war to its elemental essentials: fighter, weapon, cunning, target. Make the sniper a gorgeous,...

  • World War II Magazine

    Field Trip for the OSS Women

    A group of unconventional young women groomed for OSS field work take on leeches, exploding toilets, and the finer points of propaganda warfare. ‘It is urgently requested that great care be given in the selection of female personnel for...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Donut Dollies Dodge Bullets

    Two Red Cross volunteers discovered a whole new meaning of Thanksgiving in the jungle of Vietnam. Joann Puffer had a year of teaching and a year as an American Red Cross Donut Dolly in Korea under her belt when she volunteered to go to...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Napalm Girl

    The saga of Kim Phuc will forever be a clarion to the consequences of war and the resilience of the human spirit. Forty years ago, a 9-year-old girl severely burned by napalm ran screaming down a highway in Vietnam, her clothes torn off to...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Just how much can a girl get away with?

    When the Civil War began, no one—neither politicians nor military men—expected to have to contend with women. War, like the politics that made it, was men’s work; women were innocents to be protected. This idea was as old as...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Fighting Sarah Thompson

    Union troops in Confederate territory opposition from secessionist women. Confederates, expected however, hadn’t anticipated having to do battle with Union-sympathizing Southern women. Unionism among Southerners was an unexpected and...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: No more driver’s lash for me

    At the very birth of the republic, Thomas Jefferson expressed his fear that slavery destroyed slaves’ love of country, turned them into enemies and nurtured traitors at the American breast. Eighty years later, during the birth pangs of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Women, Combat, and the Gender Line

    A secret World War II study proved that female soldiers were ready to serve under fire. Other nations made warriors of their women. Why did we? WOMEN WERE THE INVISIBLE COMBATANTS OF World War II. Hundreds of thousands fought—not as...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hometown Heroine: Helen Richey

    Record-setting pilot Helen Richey fought for a spot in a man’s world. In the steel town of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, readers of the local Daily News stared in shock at the headline on January 8, 1947: “Helen Richey—McKeesport’s...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Bat Masterson’s Emma

    Although Emma Masterson largely kept to the background while married to the famous former frontier lawman, she had led a sporting life with her fleet-footed first husband. William Barclay Masterson, best known simply as “Bat,” was a...