Women's History Archives | Page 2 of 32 | HistoryNet MENU

Women’s History

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- February 2007

    A Haunting Secret Revealed Somehow Elfriede Rinkel kept her dark secret for more than 40 years. The truth revealed, the U.S. government has sent her back home. Rinkel was a dog handler at the women-only Ravensbrück concentration camp...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- August 2007

    Japanese Prime Minister Sparks a New Uproar Over Apology to Wartime “Comfort Women” Under pressure from the U.S. Congress and members of Japan’s opposition party, Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe recently offered an apology to the...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Combat Nurse’s Exhausting Sorrows, Unexpected Joys

    Army nurse June Wandrey stood five feet two inches tall with, in her words, “finely honed muscles that were dynamite ready.” That forceful spirit was evident in her wartime letters as well; Wandrey did not mince phrases when it came to...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Leni

    Leni: The Life & Work of Leni Riefenstahl By Steven Bach. 400 pp. Knopf, 2007. $30. In famous (or infamous) works like Triumph of the Will and Olympia, the twentieth century’s most notorious woman filmmaker found beauty in the...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Spy Who Proved the Adage About Love and War

    While working as a spy for the British in Washington in May 1941, Amy Elizabeth Thorpe was offered a choice: she could seduce the French ambassador, his counselor, or his aide. She chose the aide, a man named Charles Emanuel Brousse, which...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Review: Civil War Women

    civilwarwomen.blogspot.com When it comes to the women of the Civil War period, most people are still only familiar with the “usual suspects”—nurses like Clara Barton, former slaves like Sojourner Truth and famous wives like Varina...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Avenging Angel

    She was cantankerous, pugnacious, illiterate and profane. Best of all, she wouldn’t take no for an answer—not even from Jefferson Davis. Anyone with even cursory knowledge of the Civil War has heard of Clara Barton, who received the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Runaway Slave on the Wisconsin-Canada Line

    On July 4, 1842, Caroline Quarlls, a 16-year-old St. Louis slave, made her escape to freedom and lived to write about it 38 years later. She had thought about running away for more than a year,had managed to acquire $100, but had yet to...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Caved Inn at Vicksburg

    Three eyewitness accounts describe what it was like for Vicksburg civilians to burrow underground to escape unrelenting shellfire. In the spring and summer of 1863, as the following accounts show, Vicksburg residents found themselves in a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: The Limping Lady Spy

    Virginia Hall Office of Strategic Services Distinguished Service Cross France March–September 1944 By any measure, Virginia Hall is one of America’s two greatest female war heroes. Mary Edwards Walker, who earned the Medal of Honor...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Amelia Earhart- Image and Icon

    Amelia Earhart: Image and Icon by Kristen Lubben, Susan Butler and Susan Ware, Steidl/International Center of Photography, New York, 2007, $28. Paris Hilton and Amelia Earhart would have had much in common. Both women are or were quite...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Jackie Cochran

    Jackie Cochran: Pilot in the Fastest Lane by Doris L. Rich, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, 2007, $24.95. Jacqueline Cochran led an incredible life. Besides managing a successful business, marrying a millionaire, serving as a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Baroness of Flight

    Raymonde de Laroche’s first flight with Wilbur Wright sparked a fatal attraction to flying. When Wilbur Wright went to France in 1908 to demonstrate the Flyer to skeptical French officials, he followed his dazzling aerial displays near...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Baby Doe Tabor

    Baby Doe Tabor: The Madwoman in the Cabin by Judy Nolte Temple, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2007, $24.95. As the title says, she probably became (but who are we to judge) a madwoman in a cabin, guarding the Matchless (and now...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Mo-chi: First Female Cheyenne Warrior

    Also known as Buffalo Calf Woman, she survived the attacks by soldiers at Sand Creek in 1864 and the Washita River in 1868 and vowed vengeance against those who murdered her family and her people. On a bitter cold November day on the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Cheyenne Women Honor Tradition

    Mo-chi did, too, although she was unique. Mo-chi, known as the first female Cheyenne warrior, was hardly typical of the women in her tribe. Cheyenne women didn’t usually fight alongside their husbands in battle or on raids, and they...