Weaponry Archives | Page 2 of 27 | HistoryNet MENU

Weaponry

  • World War II Magazine

    A Quickly Improvised Panzer Killer

    The M-3 Gun Motor Carriage served the U.S. Army’s tank destroyer force temporarily but well. With war looming in Europe in the late 1930s, the United States began the long, slow process of rearming its military, hoping to achieve field...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- April 2007

    Bren Backfire I wanted to add to your November 2006 article about the Bren gun, which is considered by many to be the finest light machine gun (LMG) ever made. The author did not address the disadvantages associated with guns such as the...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Homemade Aussie Submachine Gun

    The unconventional Owen stood up well to the hard conditions of jungle fighting. Army ordnance officers at the Victoria Barracks in Sydney politely showed 24-year-old inventor Evelyn Owen the door in July 1939 when he came calling with the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Bombs that were Smart Before their Time

    On the afternoon of Thursday, September 9, 1943, Adm. Carlo Bergamini was a worried man. The day before, the Italian government had signed an armistice, and that morning, at 2:30 a.m., he had sortied from La Spezia to deliver the remains...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Hour of Victory

    With the multitude of World War II first person shooter titles available, originality is the defining factor in the success of new additions to this crowded field. Hour of Victory attempts to be original in an original way: rather than...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man on the Trail of the Nazi A-bomb

    The first five Allied vehicles to enter Paris on its day of liberation from Nazi occupation on August 25, 1944, were tanks of the Free French forces. The sixth was an American jeep. Dodging sniper fire, it cut through back streets and...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Weapon GIs Hated Worst

    The Acht Acht was equally deadly against tanks and planes. The most famous cartoon characters of World War II were Bill Mauldin’s scruffy and unshaven soldiers Joe and Willie, who could always be counted on to capture the gripes, dreams,...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Town that Gave Birth to the Bomb

    Los Alamos is misleading. Most New Mexico towns, with their quaint adobe walls, emanate a sense of the past. But Los Alamos on first inspection lacks any feeling of real history. You drive up through some magnificent country into this town...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Ultimate Weapon

    Precision-guided munitions have changed the modern battlefield, and in the process created a new American way of war. On March 30, 1972, as American troop strength in Vietnam fell to a seven-year low—well below the hundred-thousand...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fighting Words: Weapon-Derived Phrases

    Our lexicographer considers some widespread words and phrases derived from weaponry. From earliest times to the present, weaponry has given us numerous expressions that appear in everyday speech. Take, for example, All early firearms were...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Developing the Fire Team

    Various nations explored ways to deploy automatic rifles before the cosmopolitan fire team found a permanent home in the U.S. Marine Corps. For more than half a century, the rifle squads of the U.S. Marine Corps have been organized with a...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Gunfighting Over North Vietnam

    Despite the visions of post-Korea U.S. aircraft designers, the days of old-fashioned aerial machine guns were far from over. A brilliant sky greeted Major Durward Priester of the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing (TFW) as he led a flight of four...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal | The M-41 Walker Bulldog

    A mainstay of ARVN armored units right up to the fall of South Vietnam. Operation Lam Son 719 took South Vietnamese forces deep into Laotian territory in February 1971. Intending to cut the Ho Chi Minh Trail, troops of the Army of the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- April 2008

    Sainthood for Vietnam War chaplain? Since his death on the battlefield on Sept. 4, 1967, many Marines who knew Rev. Vincent Capodanno have called their chaplain a saint and have offered testimonies to his bravery, compassion and genuine...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Improvised Weapons in the Mekong Delta

    Fighting in the Mekong Delta presented myriad difficulties. The entire region is covered with swamp, rivers, streams and canals that severely hampered land movement and placed hardships on ground troops assigned to fight there. Roads were...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal | A-4 Skyhawk

    From the first shot to the last, the Navy’s most prodigious attack aircraft of the war. On August 5, 1964, aircraft from the USS Constellation and Ticonderoga struck the North Vietnamese fuel depot at Vinh and three enemy PT boat bases....