Treatment of Wounded Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Treatment of Wounded

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Civilian medic’s routine service in a Vietnam war zone

    As a civilian medic serving in the midst of war in Vietnam from 1965 to 1972, I had my share of close calls. I found myself in plenty of hairy experiences, often alongside GIs who displayed remarkable acts of courage and compassion, but...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Medics make life-or-death decisions

    God and all North Vietnam could see us. We were outside Khe Sanh on Operation Scotland II and had stopped at midday to take a bit of rest and to eat. Very tired from humping the hills on this operation, we had set up on the side of a hill...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Review: Vietnam Nurses

    Vietnam Nurses with Dana Delany DVD produced by Creative Street Productions, 2006, $21.95, vietnamnursesdvd.com Dana Delany is not a Vietnam nurse, but she played one on TV. This award- winning documentary hosted by the China Beach star is...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A Combat Medic’s Three-war Odyssey

    In the first hours of the Tet Offensive, Wayne Slagel earned the second star to his Combat Medical Badge— one of America’s rarest military awards. At the age of 45, Wayne Slagel had been around. In 1968 he was in yet an- other combat...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letters from Readers- February 2009

    How Confusion Crept Onto the Maps The letter from Daniel R. Arant (August 2008) about map names reminded me of an old problem we had in Vietnam. In January 1966, I was tasked to create an intelligence unit for Maj. Gen. Joseph A....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Review: The Prisoner of Shark Island

    The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936) Directed by John Ford Life, as the old saying goes, often imitates art, but more often than not it proves more interesting, especially if your name has become synonymous with a bad reputation. That’s...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Review: National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, MD.

    The critical role of medicine in the Civil War has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The conflict’s staggering casualty count brought into focus the treatment of the sick and wounded at a time when military medicine and...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Best Medicine

    Death came slowly to soldiers wounded on the battlefields of antiquity. The muscle-powered weapons that hacked at their flesh only rarely inflicted sudden death. Bodies pierced by spears or slashed by swords lingered in agony, sometimes...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Collateral Damage: The Weikert Farm’s Controversial Legacy

    A crowd of surgeons and orderlies descended on Jacob Weikert’s farm south of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Elements of the Army of the Potomac’s V  Corps were fighting on Little Round Top, just west of the farm. By the time the last...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Collateral Damage: Repaying a Debt of Compassion

    In October 1886, John L. Rice—formerly a private of the 2nd New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry—made his way on horseback to Amos and Margaret Benson’s home in northern Virginia, intent on repaying an old debt. How Rice incurred that...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience of War: Morphine, Splints, and Hot Tea

    Early in World War I, a doctor follows a day of fierce fighting at the Marne with a long night caring for the wounded and dying. Arthur Anderson Martin, a small-town doctor from New Zealand, was attending a medical conference in England...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Napalm Girl

    The saga of Kim Phuc will forever be a clarion to the consequences of war and the resilience of the human spirit. Forty years ago, a 9-year-old girl severely burned by napalm ran screaming down a highway in Vietnam, her clothes torn off to...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Who Are the Bad Guys?

    In the midst of deathly violence, humanity could prevail even among enemies. As a handful of soldiers gathered around the medic and his patient in the jungle’s growing darkness, one of them asked: “Is she doin’ any better, Doc? Is...

  • HistoryNet, Interviews

    Ten Questions: J.R. Martinez

    Iraq War veteran J.R. Martinez has become a household name by turning tragedy into triumph. After suffering severe burns as a result of a roadside bomb explosion, the former Soldier is now widely known as an actor, author, radio...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Surgery in the Front Lines

    Starting in World War I, military hospitals moved closer and closer to bullets-flying combat, culminating in the legendary Korean War MASH units. Two years before the United States declared war on Germany, in 1915, a few American...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: Olmsted at War

    During the Civil War, Frederick Law Olmsted left landscape design behind to help create the U.S. Sanitary Commission...