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  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Tarawa, Central Pacific Ocean

    Sixty-five years ago, U.S. Marines launched a daring and most dangerous amphibious assault against Tarawa in the Central Pacific. The bitter battle lasted just 76 hours, but the price in lives and the number of wounded was astounding and...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Grafton, Utah

    In 1849 Elder Parley P. Pratt, the great-great-grandfather of presidential candidate Mitt Romney, led the first Mormons into southwestern Utah, describing it as “a country…turned inside out, upside down, by terrible convulsions in some...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: St. Elmo, Colorado

    In 1875 prospector Dr. Abner Ellis Wright struck gold in Colorado’s remote Chalk Creek Canyon, discovering the vein that would yield the Mary Murphy Mine and support St. Elmo for 50 years. In spring 1880, Griffith Evans and several...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Garnet, Montana

    Lode mines were discovered at the 6,500-foot level in the Garnet Mountains as early as 1867, when prospectors from Bear Gulch, 2,000 feet below, wandered up First Chance Creek looking for the source of their placer gold. But the area was...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Animas Forks, Colorado

    Prospectors first discovered silver in 1873 and settled where several streams met to form the Animas River, 12 miles northeast of present-day Silverton, in Colorado’s San Juan County. Originally called Three Forks of the Animas, the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Chloride, New Mexico

    In 1879 Englishman Harry Pye hid in a gulch from Apaches while transporting freight via an Army mule train to Camp Ojo Caliente in the Black Range of southwestern New Mexico Territory. The site contained a rich vein of silver chloride. The...

  • American History Magazine

    Cahokia Mounds Site Was America’s First City

    For almost 25 years I drove past highway signs on I-55 announcing the turnoff for the Cahokia Mounds historic site when – ever I made the trip from Chicago to my childhood home in the Ozarks. I would hesitate, remember the five hours...

  • World War II Magazine

    Smooth Sailing for an Old Warship

    Looking around at many of my seven hundred fellow passengers making their way up the gang plank, I realize they faced decidedly different circumstances the first time they made this walk, some sixty-five years ago. The serene sky and calm...

  • World War II Magazine

    Rising From Its Brutal Past, Warsaw Transforms Itself

    Outside Warsaw’s Centralna Station I face the grayest day I have ever seen. The fog banks that had accompanied my morning train from Berlin are now a monotonous sheet hanging from the tops of Warsaw’s well-spaced buildings. Across from...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Tours of Vietnam

    Tours of Vietnam: War, Travel Guides, and Memory by Scott Laderman, Duke University Press, 2009 Author Scott Laderman lost me with his “Prefatory Note,” a four-page introduction to his Introduction, in which he explains why in a book...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: Antietam, South Mountain & Harpers Ferry

    Antietam, South Mountain & Harpers Ferry: A Battlefield Guide  by Ethan S. Rafuse, Bison Books, 2008, $21.95 “Now I know what to do!” Major General George B. McClellan reportedly exclaimed when handed a lost copy of Robert E....

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Pegasus & Horsa Bridges Normandy, France

    The first battle of D-Day started 16 minutes after midnight on June 6, 1944. The glider-borne assault on two bridges—over the Caen Canal and adjacent Orne River—was among the most spectacular of the special operations carried out...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: A Remarkable Curiosity

    A Remarkable Curiosity: Dispatches from a New York City Journalist’s 1873 Railroad Trip across the American West by Amos J. Cummings, compiled and edited by Jerald T. Milanich, University Press of Colorado, Boulder, 2008, $26.95. In May...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: South Pass City, Wyoming

    Prospectors were panning gold from the Sweetwater near South Pass (in present-day Wyoming) as early as 1842, but the first real rush came in 1865 when a detachment from Fort Bridger discovered gold in the Wind River Range. One soldier...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Ironton, Colorado

    In August 1882, prospector John Robinson was hunting game on Red Mountain, Colo., to feed his partners when he found a large chunk of lead and silver ore. The partners’ subsequent Yankee Girl, Orphan Boy and Robinson claims, coupled with...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Canyon Diablo, Arizona

    In 1880 the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad began constructing a bridge over 250-foot-deep Canyon Diablo, midway between Winslow and Flagstaff. Financial difficulties halted the project, leaving an incomplete span at rail’s end. A town...