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  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Tours of Vietnam

    Tours of Vietnam: War, Travel Guides, and Memory by Scott Laderman, Duke University Press, 2009 Author Scott Laderman lost me with his “Prefatory Note,” a four-page introduction to his Introduction, in which he explains why in a book...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Old Hachita, New Mexico

    Indians mined turquoise for centuries in the mountains in extreme southwestern New Mexico; the small knives and hatchets they left behind prompted the Spanish to name the range Hachita. American prospectors explored the area around 1875,...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: The Garden Spot Where Hitler’s War Ended and the Cold...

    ON APRIL 26, 1945, six days before Soviet troops finished taking what smoldering husks were left of Berlin, they captured Cecilienhof Palace in Potsdam, 17 miles to the southwest. Built during World War I by Kaiser Wilhelm II for Crown...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Cold Harbor, Virginia

    By the late spring of 1864 Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant was advancing on the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va., and relentlessly pressuring Robert E. Lee’s army. With his appointment as commander of the Union forces, Grant had brought a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Hill 314, Mortain, France

    The French village of Mortain sits halfway up the western slope of what during World War II the U.S. Army referred to as Hill 314. The promontory’s highest point, 314 meters above sea level (about 600 feet above the valley floor),...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Morristown, New Jersey

    Although the 1777–78 winter encampment at Valley Forge, Pa., is firmly fixed in Americans’ collective memory, the situation at Morristown two years later was far bleaker. The Army’s inexperience with winter encampments, hut...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: The Kahlenberg, Vienna

    The Ottoman Turks gained their first foothold in Europe at Gallipoli in 1354. In 1529 they reached Vienna and almost took the capital of the Habsburg Empire. They made a second attempt in 1683 and would have succeeded if not for the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: The Reichswald, Germany

    The 1945 Battle of the Reichswald was for Anglo-Canadian forces what the earlier Battle of the Hürtgen Forest had been for American troops. The British attack through the densely wooded and tenaciously defended northern sector of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Bosworth Field, England

    The premature death of England’s King Henry V in 1422 left a power vacuum that in the Middle Ages could have but one result—civil war. For a time a regency council ruled in the stead of the infant Henry VI, with only minor squabbling...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Harshaw to Lochiel, Arizona

    In 1539 Franciscan friar Marcos de Niza set out to explore the region north of Sonora, Mexico, fabled to contain untold riches. Fray Marcos found no gold, but he is credited with being the first European to set foot on U.S. soil west of...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Shakespeare, New Mexico

    A spring in an arroyo near New Mexico’s Pyramid Mountains brought Apaches, Mexicans and Americans to what would become Shakespeare. Dubbed Mexican Spring by whites, in 1856 it became a stop on an alternate route of the early San Antonio...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Ashcroft, Colorado

    Prospectors Charles B. Culver and Amos Kindt spent the winter of 1879– 80 at the forks of Castle Creek, 12 miles south of Aspen in central Colorado’s Elk Mountains. In May 1880 Culver and William F. Coxhead filed claims in the area,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Sego, Utah

    Gold and silver drew men west, but coal powered the nation. While most of today’s well-known Western ghost towns prospered during the search for precious metals, Sego was a coal town, supplying fuel for railroads, homes and industry....

  • Wild West Magazine

    Haunted Hotels of the West

    Writer-photographer Bob Stinson, an aficionado of the Wild West and a believer in paranormal activity, recently ventured to a handful of Western hotels, armed only with a camera, in hopes of “shooting” a ghost at rest or otherwise. We...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Towns: Terlingua, Texas

    Terlingua, near the Chisos and Christmas mountains in Texas’ Big Bend region, owes its existence to the blood-red ore cinnabar, from which quicksilver, or mercury, is extracted. But its character stems equally from one overbearing Yankee...

  • American History Magazine

    History Happened Here

    Five heritage sites you should go out of your way to visit. Chances are you can quickly tick off the country’s major historic sights: Independence Hall in Philadelphia and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, Bunker Hill in Boston...