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Soviet Union

  • MHQ Magazine

    Views of War and Revolution in Russia

    Throughout history, artists have portrayed the military events of their times. We think of images of Napoleon’s victories, the hell of the Western Front, and an aerial bombardment of a small Basque town during the Spanish Civil War. The...

  • American History Magazine

    Sputnik 1957

    The Cold War got hot when the Soviets successfully launched the first satellite into space. To Americans who had spent the 1950s on a frenzied hunt for Communists, Sputnik—Russian for ‘fellow traveler’—was a sure sign that their...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hardware | S-75 Dvina

    Like many weapons used during the Vietnam War, the Soviet-made S-75 Dvina (NATO reporting name SA-2 Guideline) surface-to-air missile was a Cold War design adapted for nonnuclear warfare. Conceived in 1953 by the Almaz design bureau under...

  • Military History, MH Issues

    September 2018 Table of Contents

    The September 2018 issue features a cover story about the scrutiny of captured Soviet T-54A tanks during the 1956 Hungarian Revolution...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Stalin and His Hangmen

    Stalin and His Hangmen: The Tyrant and Those Who Killed for Him by Donald Rayfield, Random House, New York, 2005, $16.95 By now, the number of books written about Joseph Stalin has probably exceeded the number of the old Bolsheviks he...

  • World War II Magazine

    Stopped Cold at Stalingrad

    How Hitler’s stubborn decision to resupply snowbound troops by air doomed the Sixth Army and ultimately cost Germany the war. Adolf Hitler was vacationing at his retreat near Berchtesgaden in the Bavarian Alps, when a phone call on the...

  • World War II Magazine

    An American Bomber for Moscow

    When the Soviets asked the United States for advanced B-17 and B-24 bombers in 1941, what they got instead were workhorse Douglas A-20s. During the cataclysmic initial phase of Operation Barbarossa that began on June 22, 1941, the Ger-...

  • World War II Magazine

    Turnabout for the Soviets

    How the Soviets mastered the art of blitzkrieg and beat the Germans at their own game. The Soviet Union’s massive offensive against the Wehrmacht in the summer of 1944 was the death knell for the German army. When Operation Bagration...

  • World War II Magazine

    At the Gates of Moscow

    In the fall of 1941, two gargantuan armies faced each other in the largest and most costly battle in all of human history. In official accounts of the Great Patriotic War, one belief has been so sacred as to be unchallengeable: no matter...

  • World War II Magazine

    Red Sabers: J. E. B. Stuart, Soviet Cavalry Guru

    Taking a page from J. E. B. Stuart, Soviet horsemen proved that the cavalry was still a potent fighting force, even against the German blitzkrieg. On September 19, 1939, the Times of London grimly informed the British people that “the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Who Really Won the War?

    Soviet sacrifice and criminality are the unspoken truths of World War II. As a prelude to various talks on the Second World War, I often present the audience with four or five simple questions: Can you name the five biggest battles of the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Hitler’s Monster Tanks

    Three massive German armored weapons—the Maus, Ratte, and Monster—prove that bigger isn’t always better...

  • Military History, MH Interviews

    Casey Sherman & Michael Tougias: U-2s Over Cuba

    In their book Above & Beyond authors Casey Sherman and Michael Tougias relate the exploits of U-2 pilots over Cold War Cuba...

  • Military History Magazine

    Mutiny on the Sentry

    The 1975 mutiny that inspired Tom Clancy’s book The Hunt for Red October was an unmistakable sign of big trouble in the Soviet navy. At midnight on Saturday, Nov. 8, 1975, the rumble of a ship’s engines broke the stillness of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Devil’s Broomstick

    The Soviet Union was the first country to adopt a rocket-powered fighter— and swiftly abandon it. Although none of the Western powers came anywhere near the German level of rocket aircraft development before World War II, the Germans...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Red Horde Over Russia

    Built in vast numbers, Aleksandr Yakovlev’s fighters were among the most important Allied aircraft of World War II. Yakovlev aircraft have become as closely associated with World War II Soviet air power as Messerschmitts are with the...