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Soldiers

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: War’s Relentless Hand

    War’s Relentless Hand: Twelve Tales of Civil War Soldiers by Mark H. Dunkelman, Louisiana State University Press, 2006, 288 pages, $34.95. Some 40 years ago Mark Dunkelman set out to follow the sparse paper trail left by his...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    War’s Flawed Prisoner Exchange Program

    They were places of wretchedness and death. Like poisonous weeds, they sprouted and multiplied, blighting a nation’s character. Their nourishment had been men, tens of thousands of condemned souls. They possessed damnable...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Caught in the Chaos of West Virginia

    Name: Irwin D. Johnson Dates: 1831-1910 Allegiance: Confederate Highest Rank: Private Unit: Company G, 10th Virginia Cavalry Service Record: Enlisted August 5, 1861, 10th Virginia Cavalry. Captured in Braxton County, W.Va., in February...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Cut Down in Gettysburg’s Wheatfield

    Name: Horatio F. Lewis Dates: 1845-1863 Allegiance: Union Highest Rank: First Lieutenant Unit: 145th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D Service Record: Enlisted August 6, 1862, and mustered in on August 27 in Erie. Served with the Army of...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Black Soldiers, Southern Victory?

    Patrick Cleburne’s plan for arming slaves might have turned the tide of the Civil War at a time when all other hope for the Confederacy was lost. On January 2, 1864, a month after the South’s devastating defeat at Chattanooga, General...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life

    Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 by Carlton McCarthy Historians have a short memory when it comes to the history of their own craft. Beginning in the 1960s, scholars increasingly looked at the...

  • World War II Magazine

    No Stone Unturned

    The U.S. Army improved its laboratory and investigation methods after World War II to help the Graves Registration Service identify the unknown American war dead. In 1946 the Army turned to Dr. Harry L. Shapiro, chairman and curator of...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Last Detail

    The Graves Registration Service faced the daunting postwar challenge of returning nearly a quarter-million fallen soldiers to the United States. The awed silence was broken only by the steady, hollow clop of hooves and the muffled...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Indestructible

    Indestructible: The Unforgettable Story of a Marine Hero at the Battle of Iwo Jima by Jack H. Lucas and D.K. Drum, Da Capo Press, Cambridge, Mass., 2006, $15.95 In Indestructible, World War II veteran Jack H. Lucas has teamed with author...

  • World War II Magazine

    March of the Unknown Generals

    Two men with stars braved sniper fire on Guadalcanal, inspiring a couple of frightened young Marines. Occasionally during combat an incident occurs that one can recall with absolute clarity even decades later. For this Marine, that...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- August 2007

    The Airmen of the Fifteenth I served in the Fifteenth Air Force, 483rd Bomb Group, 815th Bomb Squadron, stationed at Foggia, Italy. Our B-17 Flying Fortress, named “Patches,” was shot down during our twelfth bombing mission over...

  • World War II Magazine

    Gunners at Arnhem

    The heroism of a little-known artillery unit staved off an even greater debacle at Arnhem. For all that the Battle of Arnhem has been analyzed, studied, and written about, one part of the story has received scant attention: the heroic role...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Young Marine at Tulagi

    A young marine comes of age on 31/2 square miles of island jungle in the Pacific. I know where I was a month ago, a year ago, or a decade ago, but I do know precisely where I was sixty-five years ago last August 8. On that date I was one...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Weapon GIs Hated Worst

    The Acht Acht was equally deadly against tanks and planes. The most famous cartoon characters of World War II were Bill Mauldin’s scruffy and unshaven soldiers Joe and Willie, who could always be counted on to capture the gripes, dreams,...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Soldier’s Death Far from the Field of Battle

    Thousands of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines lost their lives in World War II during training exercises, their sacrifices often over looked. On August 28, 1944, a woman in Quincy, Washington, Mrs. W. C. Grigg, witnessed one...

  • World War II Magazine

    First Blood for the Army Rangers at Dieppe

    The attack on Dieppe was a fiasco. But it was where the U.S. Special Forces were born. The Allied landing at Dieppe on the coast of France in August 1942 is scarcely mentioned in most accounts of World War II. When it is, it is called a...