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Social History

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Napalm Girl

    The saga of Kim Phuc will forever be a clarion to the consequences of war and the resilience of the human spirit. Forty years ago, a 9-year-old girl severely burned by napalm ran screaming down a highway in Vietnam, her clothes torn off to...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letter from the Editor- June 2012

    Vol.25 No.1 and Other Milestones This issue of Vietnam is the first of our 25th year of publication. In 1988, retired Army colonel and founding editor Harry G. Summers Jr. wrote in the premier issue: “Perplexing and baffling the Vietnam...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- June 2012

    Tapes Give New Voice to JFK’s Vietnam Doubt The last 45 hours of more than 248 hours of declassified conversations of President John F. Kennedy, taped in the White House shortly before his death, reveal a president worried about where...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Legends: Sing a song of war

    Since the dawn of time, men have waged war, and always there was the music. Horns and drums, lyres and pipes inspired and preceded men into battle; bards celebrated victory, lamented defeat. We know this from Homer, from the Celtic and...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    How Washington Got its Police Force

    They called it “the great skedaddle.” Union troops who had taken to the field brimming with confidence staggered back to the nation’s capital in shocked defeat after the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861. Walt Whitman described...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Review: Birth of a Nation

    D. W. Griffith’s technologically brilliant, virulently racist film, Birth of a Nation, is the Higgs boson from which all modern Civil War cinema has evolved. In turn hailed and reviled, it is a touchstone for the erratic course the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Grant’s Obnoxious Order

    As with so many prickly issues of the Civil War, the controversy between Ulysses S. Grant and the Jews had its roots in the curse of cotton. By the autumn of 1862, the South’s last great cotton crop was in— picked and baled; worth tens...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: No more driver’s lash for me

    At the very birth of the republic, Thomas Jefferson expressed his fear that slavery destroyed slaves’ love of country, turned them into enemies and nurtured traitors at the American breast. Eighty years later, during the birth pangs of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Nonstop to Hawaii By Air and Sea

    When Commander John Rodgers’ PN-9 ran low on fuel 400 miles short of his destination, like a good Navy man he rigged the flying boat and sailed the rest of the way. Two years before Charles Lindbergh made his epic solo flight across the...

  • Military History Magazine

    A World of Hurt

    Long-forgotten explosives continue to wreak havoc around the globe. The farm workers had spent a long, hot day harvesting chili peppers in Battambang province, hard against Cambodia’s border with Thailand. They were riding home on a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Dinky Toys Aircraft

    Dinky Toys Aircraft: 1934-1979 by Geoffrey Randolph “GR” Webster, blurb.com, London, 2011, $95.95 Funny thing about history: Time can confer it on anything and everything. After Liverpool-based Dinky Toys began producing die-cast metal...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Airline of the Jet Age

    Airline of the Jet Age: A History by R.E.G. Davies, Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, Washington, D.C., 2011, $99.95 Many words describe this book, including encyclopedic, impressive, indispensible and groundbreaking. But sadly, the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hometown Heroine: Helen Richey

    Record-setting pilot Helen Richey fought for a spot in a man’s world. In the steel town of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, readers of the local Daily News stared in shock at the headline on January 8, 1947: “Helen Richey—McKeesport’s...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Review: Airline Tycoon 2

    Wannabe aviation entrepreneurs confront real-world economic realities. Today the airline business is tougher than ever following a decade-long siege of security concerns, a struggling economy and major consolidations. Little of this drama...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Thousand Miles by Airship

    In 1910 an eccentric newspaperman, his crew and a cat set out from Atlantic City in a dirigible, aiming to make the first transatlantic crossing by air. W alter Wellman is hardly a household name today, but he made a significant...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Battle of the Hot Springs Gamblers

    Major S.A. Doran’s gang ambushed Frank ‘Boss Gambler’ Flynn and two of his brothers in February 1884, triggering an exchange as deadly as the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Most people who traveled to Hot Springs, Arkansas, in the...