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Social History

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Tigers of the Southwest

    From early childhood, Apaches we were raised in a warrior culture that produced the greatest guerrilla fighters of all time. Their tactics  defied the Spanish, Mexican and American armies for 300 years. It was early November 1885 when...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Cash City Booms, Then Goes Bust

    Kansas farmers’ field day could not last. The cattlemen of the 1870s were the first white settlers to occupy the watershed of the Cimarron and Arkansas rivers in southwestern Kansas. The rolling plain, covered with a mat of close-curled...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Tlingits Had Totems Near Their Doors

    They also wielded skull-crushing clubs. In April 1877, sometime-poet Lieutenant Charles Erskine Scott Wood arrived in Sitka, Alaska, on orders to escort Charles Taylor. The adventurer was making an attempt to scale what was then believed...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Apaches Grabbed Charlie McComas

    Then soldiers chased the raiders to Mexico. Hamilton C. McComas believed New Mexico Territory was a land of opportunity. Born in Parkersburg, Virginia, in 1831, he became a lawyer at age 21. Following his Western dream, he moved to...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Black Jack Shot Lawman Hocker

    Deputy marshal survived terrible wounds. Near Purcell, Indian Territory, on August 23, 1895, the outlaw “Black Jack” Bill Christian shot Deputy U.S. Marshal Jake Hocker just above the heart. The rifle ball passed through the upper part...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Interview: This ‘Son-of-a-Basque’ Sees the Big Picture in the West

    Richard Etulain goes Beyond the Missouri. Richard W. Etulain is rooted deep in the American West. His Basque father, an immigrant from Spain, became a sheepherder and stockman in the Pacific Northwest.His mother sprang from sod house...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Baby Doe Tabor

    Baby Doe Tabor: The Madwoman in the Cabin by Judy Nolte Temple, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2007, $24.95. As the title says, she probably became (but who are we to judge) a madwoman in a cabin, guarding the Matchless (and now...

  • Wild West Magazine

    As Good As Little ‘Bits,’ Tokens Were a Big Hit

    In saloons, tokens were convenient and valuable. Tokens, coinlike objects that have a stated or implied value in trade, originated in the Ancient World, were used in Colonial America and are sometimes still used today in arcades, slot...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Cheyenne Women Honor Tradition

    Mo-chi did, too, although she was unique. Mo-chi, known as the first female Cheyenne warrior, was hardly typical of the women in her tribe. Cheyenne women didn’t usually fight alongside their husbands in battle or on raids, and they...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Mary Schwandt’s Ordeal During the Sioux Uprising

    Her family fell, and she was captured. Of the many personal stories from the 1862 Sioux Uprising in Minnesota, none is more emblematic of the experience of the recently arrived settlers than that of Mary Schwandt. Kidnapped at age 14, she...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience | Wartime Diarist

    For seven years Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren, who would become world-famous for her Pippi Longstocking books, kept notes on “a world gone mad.”...

  • Ask Mr. History

    Where did the 1500-hour Requirement for ATP come from?

    Do you know where the 1500-hour requirement to get an ATP came from?  When and why? Is it just an arbitrary number someone came up with years ago?   Thank you. Curt Boettcher   ???   Dear Mr. Boettcher, The crash...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Driven Out

    Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans by Jean Pfaelzer, Random House, New York, 2007, $27.95. The discovery of gold in California in January 1848 attracted hordes of prospectors, entrepreneurs and workers, but not all...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The West Goes Pop

    Andy Warhol created a West portfolio a year before his death. Andy Warhol may be better known for his cans of Campbell’s Soup and his Marilyn Monroes, but his penchant for making Pop Art out of America’s national myths also drew him to...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Celebrating the Fourth Frontier-Style

    Independence Day meant something to William Clark, to those emigrants who arrived at Independence Rock in time and to anyone in need of a lift. Twenty-eight years after the United States proclaimed its independence from England, somebody...

  • Wild West Magazine

    When the Cowboys Went on Strike

    After corporate ranching came to Texas. In the spring of 1883, a group of cowboys walked off the job in Oldham County, in northwest Texas by the New Mexico line. The strike came about because Gilded Age business practices were moving West,...