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Ships & Boats

  • Vietnam Magazine

    MS Amastra’s perilous duty on behalf of the US at Nha Trang

    It is rare that a naval vessel once sunk to the bottom of the sea is given a new lease on life. But the motor ship (MS) Amastra, a British-registered Shell Oil tanker under the command of Captain J. Campkin, had such a second life.  ...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    A Union Whale Surfaces in New Jersey

    Intelligent Whale, the war’s most advanced submarine, has been sitting quietly for years in a New Jersey museum. Many thought it was a postwar machine. It’s time to rewrite American naval history. It’s easy to get swept into the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Heavy, Slow and Ugly

    USS Lafayette and Choctaw, cargo ships converted to gunboats, ponderously patrolled the Mississippi River and its waterways. Sure, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia revolutionized naval warfare and sounded the death knell of wooden-walled...

  • Military History Magazine

    Dawn of the Gun Ships

    John Hawkins drew on his experience at sea to create a state-of-the-art fighting ship, ultimately crushing the Spanish Armada and securing English dominion of the high seas. The introduction of heavy guns to naval warfare came at a time...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    USS Galena: De-evolution of a Warship

    USS Galena failed as an ironclad, but a tight-fisted U.S. Navy returned the ship to the age of sail, stripping the technological lemon of its armor and sending it back into the fray. On a chilly February 14, 1862, Valentine’s Day, at the...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Today- October 2008

    Cedar Creek Battlefield: Ruined Forever? A serious dispute between the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation and nearby Belle Grove Plantation broke out at a May 28 meeting of the Frederick County, Va., Board of Supervisors, where a 4-3 vote...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    ‘The Monitor Is No More’

    USS Monitor’s famous clash with CSS Virginia is etched in history. But perhaps its most important battle was the one to save itself. Massive waves pounded across USS Monitor’s deck on December 30, 1862, choking and drowning frantic...

  • World War II Magazine

    Smooth Sailing for an Old Warship

    Looking around at many of my seven hundred fellow passengers making their way up the gang plank, I realize they faced decidedly different circumstances the first time they made this walk, some sixty-five years ago. The serene sky and calm...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Rise and Fall of CSS Virginia

    Did a radical new Confederate gunship foil McClellan’s plan to end the Civil War in 1862? In late 1861, conventional wisdom, North and South, posited that he who control Hampton Roads in Virginia controlled the fate of the nation. And...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Vietnam Ironclads

    Vietnam Ironclads: A Pictorial History of U.S. Navy River Assault Craft, 1966- 1970 by John M. Carrico. Brown Water Enterprises, 2007, $39.95 Gunboat diplomacy became a byword for Western imperialism before World War II, and the U.S. Navy...

  • Military History Magazine

    Interview with Alfred S. McLaren: Waging Cold War Beneath the Ice

    Renowned for his pioneering research into the role polar regions play in global climate change, Dr. Alfred S. McLaren is also a noted undersea explorer who has dived on such historically important wrecks as Titanic and Bismarck. In his...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Arabia Steamboat Museum Captures Life on the Missouri in 1856

    Showcases sunken treasures, harvested from a farmer’s field. Nineteenth-century pioneers quipped that the big Western rivers were “too thick to drink, too thin to plow.” Boatmen knew that beneath these turbulent, muddy waters lay...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Bismark

    Bismark: The Final Days of Germany’s Greatest Battleship By Michael Tamelander and Niklas Zetterling. 320 pp. Casemate, 2009. $32.95. The nine-day combat career of Germany’s most powerful battleship is the stuff of song (Johnny...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    A Port in the Storm

    Divided loyalties within and armed mobs without plunge the United States Naval Academy into a sea of uncertainty. Two figures emerged onto the roof of the Executive Mansion, their silhouettes small against the cloudless immensity of blue...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Oh Shenandoah, you roiling raider!

    Stalking Yankee whalers was so much fun, the crew didn’t notice the war was over. The Scots build fine ships; they always have. And in the early 1860s, a number of their vessels found their way into the service of the Confederate Navy....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Damn those torpedoes!

    Outmanned and outgunned, the Rebels develop an explosive secret weapon. On August 5, 1864, Admiral David Farragut—“Old Salamander” to his men—led his Union fleet into a heavily mined Mobile Bay. Almost immediately, the lead monitor...