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Ships & Boats

  • MHQ Magazine

    Death Boards the Essex

    U.S. Navy captain David Porter bore the elements of greatness—but his epic 1812 Pacific voyage led to a Shakespearean final act. At age 32 in 1812, David Porter Jr., the son of a Revolutionary War seafarer, was a proud, ambitious man in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: Scuttled at Scapa Flow, 1919

    The final cruise of the German High Seas Fleet. It was 9:30 a.m. when the German High Seas Fleet came sweeping out of the morning fog lying low over the North Sea. Ahead of them lay Scotland’s Firth of Forth. Overhead, the smoke from 70...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Mid-Atlantic Brawl

    Halloween 1943: A no-holds-barred fight breaks out between crews of USS Borie (DD-215) and U-405, with weapons from torpedoes to tommy guns. For most of the World War II Battle for the North Atlantic, sailors on outmoded U.S. Navy...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Book Review: The Lucky Few by Jan K. Herman

    The Lucky Few: The Fall of Saigon and the Rescue Mission of the USS Kirk  by Jan K. Herman, Naval Institute Press, 2013 Entering service in 1971, the U.S. Navy destroyer escort Kirk was designed primarily to fight enemy submarines,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Intel: Vietnam Magazine October 2014

    Fight Over Vietnam at Nixon Library The selection of a new director for the Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda, California, has been snarled in a controversy over the library’s treatment of the Vietnam War, according to the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Might and Moxie Rule at Mobile Bay

    A wily old Union seadog drives a final nail into Rebel blockade running. With the fall of New Orleans in May 1862, Mobile, Ala., became the Confederacy’s most important port city on the Gulf of Mexico, a critical junction for Rebel...

  • Military History Magazine

    Li-Wo’s Last Fight

    Thomas Wilkinson Royal Navy Reserve Victoria Cross Java Sea February 14, 1942 His Majesty’s Ship much of a warship. Barely 160 feet long, with steam engines Li-Wo wasn’t generating less than 300 horsepower, it was built to carry...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    High Seas and High Stakes

    Would the North recognize Confederate privateers as agents of a sovereign state, or hang them from the yardarm as pirates? AMONG THE PRESSING PROBLEMS federate States of America faced in 1861 was its lack of a naval force. Although the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Saved From the Depths: Conversation with William Cambers

    BILL CHAMBERS SPENT THE war in the Merchant Marine, arguably the least appreciated of the American wartime services: it offered no military benefits and suffered the highest death rate. On his maiden voyage, Chambers reached Pearl Harbor...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: Battlewagon Becalmed

    A FLUKE OF TIMING brought us onto the battleship on December 7. The weekend my wife and I chose to beat the Christmas crunch included the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, from which the USS North Carolina would someday wage war....

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Control the Heartland: Union Ironclads in the Western Theater

    A peculiar fleet of shallow-draft, heavily armed gunboats patrolled the tributaries around Cairo, Ill., by the fall of 1861. These Yankee invaders had been pieced together using a variety of nascent naval technologies, and would have a...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Battered Beyond Belief: The USS Laffey

    At Okinawa, the USS Laffey absorbed an epic amount of suicidal punishment. On Friday, April 13, 1945, the USS Laffey sailed 20 miles west from Okinawa to Kerama Retto, a mountainous island cluster that was home to Wiseman’s Cove, a...

  • World War II Magazine

    Out of Time: The USS Hornet

    When the USS Hornet went down, coincidence enveloped a young Marine gunner. As the waves splashed and rolled past the USS Hornet, Lou Carnaghi glanced at his watch. It was just after 10 a.m. Lou treasured that watch. His folks had saved...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: On for the Long Haul

    IF DURING SOME Southern California summer you notice warplanes with wartime German markings flying toward the Port of Los Angeles, you have not entered a wormhole—it’s merely showtime. The pilots, aboard disguised AT-6 Texan trainers...

  • World War II Magazine

    Letters from Readers – June 2015 World War II

    Buying Time for Britain I’m glad to see from Robert M. Citino’s article (“Sympathy for the Neville,” January/February 2015) that I’m not the only one who appreciates Neville Chamberlain’s “appeasement” at Munich in...

  • World War II, World War II Magazine

    Death of an Escort Carrier

    For the handful of seamen who survived, the sinking of USS Liscome Bay was an experience that would :» haunt them for years to come. “Here comes a torpedo!” Spotting a white wake streaking toward his ship, a lookout aboard the U.S....