Ships & Boats Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Ships & Boats

  • HistoryNet

    America’s Daring Frigate Captains

    In the War of 1812, Britain’s powerful Royal Navy met its match in a determined band of U.S. Navy warship commanders. On June 18, 1812, the United States Congress declared war on Great Britain, initiating what some historians judge the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Field Notes- America’s Civil War July 2013

    Scientists vow to ID Monitor sailors Since dental X-rays and other such medical records didn’t exist during the Civil War, the job of identifying two sailors entombed in the USS Monitor for 150 years is a tricky one. But forensic...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Past and Present- Civil War Times June 2013

    Two Monitor Crewmen Honored at Arlington On March 8, 2013—the 151st anniversary of the historic Monitor-Merrimac battle of 1862—the remains of two unidentified Monitor sailors were buried with full honors at Arlington National...

  • World War II Magazine

    Kneeling to Neptune

    On a journey from innocence to experience, a Marine and his buddies found a flash of levity in an ancient mariners’ ritual. IN WAR THERE ARE SOME LINES YOU CROSS AND some lines you don’t. Some of those lines you’ll come back across...

  • World War II Magazine

    True Fiction: The Caine Mutiny

    Why a classic World War II story always matters. Herman Wouk’s The Caine Mutiny may be the greatest American novel of World War II. This 1951 study of men at war with a foreign foe and with each other spent 122 weeks on the New York...

  • World War II Magazine

    Goliath Unleashed: Japan’s Supership

    When Japan’s supership finally took aim at its intended enemy during history’s greatest naval battle, the result was not at all what the Japanese had envisioned. Thursday morning, October 25, 1944, found the battleship Yamato steaming...

  • HistoryNet

    Sinking An Ally, 1940

    After France surrendered to Germany, Britain’s Royal Navy smashed the French fleet at Mers-el-Kébir, Algeria. The popular narrative of World War II is typically summed up thus: In a consistent show of staunch unity, Allied forces came...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Emperor Vs. Pirate: Tunis 1535

    Suleiman’s proxy, pirate Khair ad-Din “Barbarossa,” bet that he could defend Tunis against Charles V’s massive invasion force. He was mistaken. In the winter of 1533–1534, hundreds of skilled craftsmen filled the shipyards and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Death Boards the Essex

    U.S. Navy captain David Porter bore the elements of greatness—but his epic 1812 Pacific voyage led to a Shakespearean final act. At age 32 in 1812, David Porter Jr., the son of a Revolutionary War seafarer, was a proud, ambitious man in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: Scuttled at Scapa Flow, 1919

    The final cruise of the German High Seas Fleet. It was 9:30 a.m. when the German High Seas Fleet came sweeping out of the morning fog lying low over the North Sea. Ahead of them lay Scotland’s Firth of Forth. Overhead, the smoke from 70...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Mid-Atlantic Brawl

    Halloween 1943: A no-holds-barred fight breaks out between crews of USS Borie (DD-215) and U-405, with weapons from torpedoes to tommy guns. For most of the World War II Battle for the North Atlantic, sailors on outmoded U.S. Navy...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Book Review: The Lucky Few by Jan K. Herman

    The Lucky Few: The Fall of Saigon and the Rescue Mission of the USS Kirk  by Jan K. Herman, Naval Institute Press, 2013 Entering service in 1971, the U.S. Navy destroyer escort Kirk was designed primarily to fight enemy submarines,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Intel: Vietnam Magazine October 2014

    Fight Over Vietnam at Nixon Library The selection of a new director for the Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda, California, has been snarled in a controversy over the library’s treatment of the Vietnam War, according to the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Might and Moxie Rule at Mobile Bay

    A wily old Union seadog drives a final nail into Rebel blockade running. With the fall of New Orleans in May 1862, Mobile, Ala., became the Confederacy’s most important port city on the Gulf of Mexico, a critical junction for Rebel...

  • Military History Magazine

    Li-Wo’s Last Fight

    Thomas Wilkinson Royal Navy Reserve Victoria Cross Java Sea February 14, 1942 His Majesty’s Ship much of a warship. Barely 160 feet long, with steam engines Li-Wo wasn’t generating less than 300 horsepower, it was built to carry...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    High Seas and High Stakes

    Would the North recognize Confederate privateers as agents of a sovereign state, or hang them from the yardarm as pirates? AMONG THE PRESSING PROBLEMS federate States of America faced in 1861 was its lack of a naval force. Although the...