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Ships & Boats

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    A Port in the Storm

    Divided loyalties within and armed mobs without plunge the United States Naval Academy into a sea of uncertainty. Two figures emerged onto the roof of the Executive Mansion, their silhouettes small against the cloudless immensity of blue...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Oh Shenandoah, you roiling raider!

    Stalking Yankee whalers was so much fun, the crew didn’t notice the war was over. The Scots build fine ships; they always have. And in the early 1860s, a number of their vessels found their way into the service of the Confederate Navy....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Damn those torpedoes!

    Outmanned and outgunned, the Rebels develop an explosive secret weapon. On August 5, 1864, Admiral David Farragut—“Old Salamander” to his men—led his Union fleet into a heavily mined Mobile Bay. Almost immediately, the lead monitor...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: Battle of Surigao Strait

    Battle of Surigao Strait by Anthony P. Tully, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2009, $27.95 For more than four centuries, the big gun reigned as the supreme arbiter of war at sea. Beginning in 1512, when Henry VIII commissioned the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Honored by One’s Enemy

    Lt. Cmdr. Gerard Roope British Royal Navy Victoria Cross Norwegian Sea April 8, 1940 One of World War II’s most unusual—and gallant—stories unfolded early in the war off the Norway coast. That the action prompted the award of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Act of War: Hijacking of the USS Pueblo

    North Korea’s 1968 hijacking of USS Pueblo was part of a long-standing pattern of risky military adventurism. On the afternoon of Jan. 23, 1968, an emergency message reached the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise from USS Pueblo, operating...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The USS Monitor- To Rise Again

    Last summer two teams of divers and researchers dived on the wreck of the ironclad USS Monitor, surveyed the location of artifacts, took high-definition video images and catalogued nearby marine life. Dan Crowell, who organized one...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Tinclads in the Civil War

    Tinclads in the Civil War: Union Light-Draught Gunboat Operations on Western Waters, 1862-1865 by Myron J. Smith Jr., McFarland Publishers There is a logical reason that the light-draft gunboats known as “tinclads” tend to be...

  • Military History Magazine

    Arsenal of Venice: World’s First Weapons Factory

    Venice’s maritime power arose from a shipyard that with mass-production techniques, superb organization and skilled workers could launch two new ships a day. In 1202, at the outset of the Fourth Crusade, the city-state of Venice accepted...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- February 2011

    Merciful Lie? Convicted War Criminal May Have Saved Allied Lives It was a meeting that may well have changed the course of the war— although not in the way historians have long assumed. Victory seemed to be slipping away from the Germans...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- April 2011

    The Unsinkable Higgins Boat I enjoyed your article “The Bridge to the Beach” (November/December). Only a few people knew how rugged the Higgins LCVP landing craft proved to be under actual combat conditions. After surviving three days...

  • World War II Magazine

    Clean Sweep: A Mine Sweeper’s Journey

    After the war ended, the war against underwater mines went on. One sailor’s story. On paper, in August 1945, and nearly every serviceman wanted to go home. For me and others serving on minesweepers, the war was over the end seemed...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Catch Me If You Can

    How a crafty German admiral led the Royal Navy on a wild chase across the Mediterranean and changed the balance of power in the First World War. Almost a year into World War I, American diplomat Lewis Einstein met Wilhelm Souchon, a rear...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    A Different Kind of Naval Warfare

    In early March 1862, crews in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Portsmouth, Va., rushed to complete two vessels radically different designs. In Brooklyn, the Union ironclad Monitor completed sea trials before heading to Hampton Roads, Va., to counter...

  • American History Magazine

    It was Titanic

    In 1912, a ship was the only way to cross the Atlantic Ocean, and a century later it is easy to forget that some 2 million people made the transoceanic journey that year. But the RMS more than just a ship. We forget the self-acclaim, the...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Reviews: The CSS Virginia and the USS Monitor

    The CSS Virginia: Sink Before Surrender  John V. Quarstein; The History Press Iron Coffin: War, Technology, and Experience Aboard the USS Monitor  David A. Mindell; The Johns Hopkins University Press A lot has been written on the...