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Science & Engineering

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Aviation Century- War & Peace in the Air

    Aviation Century: War & Peace in the Air by Ron Dick and Dan Patterson, Boston Mills Press, Ontario, Canada, 2006, $49.95. This, the fifth and last volume in an extraordinary series, measures up in every way to its four predecessors...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Concorde

    Concorde by Frederic Beniada and Michel Fraile, Zenith Press, St. Paul, Minn., 2006, $60. The name Concorde immediately conjures up mental images of the sleek, arrowlike Air France–British Airways supersonic transport that represented...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Pou du Ciel

    History’s first homebuilt entrepreneur named his aircraft after an insect. By the mid-1920s aviation was no longer solely the province of the professional. The man (and woman) on the street desperately wanted to get in on it....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Lindbergh Line

    Convinced the public was ready for air travel, “Lucky Lindy” launched an innovative air-and-rail service. At the tender age of 4, Gore Vidal flew on Transcontinental Air Transport’s inaugural cross-country flight in the summer of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Latin American Air Wars and Aircraft 1912-1969

    Latin American Air Wars and Aircraft 1912-1969 by Dan Hagedorn, Hikoki Publications, East Sussex, England, 2006, $59.95. Dan Hagedorn, curator for Latin American Aviation at the National Air and Space Museum, spent more than 15 years...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The China Clipper, Pan American Airways and Popular Culture

    The China Clipper, Pan American Airways and Popular Culture by Larry Weirather, McFarland, Jefferson, N.C., 2007, $35. Aviation historians remember Pan American World Airways as “the chosen instrument” of the U.S. government because it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hall’s Aluminum Wonders

    Achieving maximum strength at minimum weight. During the Golden Age of flight, many new aviation firms sprang up. By far the greater percentage failed within their first few years. The reasons vary. In some instances, the whole company was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Here Today, Gone Tomorrow

    The Airplane Division of Curtiss-Wright Corporation When World War II ended in August 1945, Curtiss-Wright Corporation could still claim the distinction of being the largest aircraft manufacturing company in the United States, having...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Airliner That Went to War

    But for the intervention of WWII, Curtiss-Wright’s big CW-20 might have displaced the Douglas DC-3 on many major air carrier routes. When First Lieutenant Edward D. Michalek, a former B-24 co-pilot, joined the Air Force Reserve in 1949,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Building a Supersonic Interceptor

    America’s first supersonic interceptor evolved from the most revolutionary development specs in U.S. Air Force history. Rather than procuring an airframe and its weapons as separate items, the 1950 proposal that spawned Convair’s F-102...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Reflections on the U.S. Air Force

    Three inspired leaders molded America’s Air Force in their own image—and changed it forever. In the first 60 years of its existence, the U.S. Air Force went from the hollow shell of its World War II demobilization status to become the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aircraft With Character

    An engineer-artist offers a unique perspective with his personality-infused illustrations. You’d be hard-pressed to find an aviation enthusiast who hasn’t seen some of Hank Caruso’s “Aerocatures.” They’ve appeared on calendars...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Skyblazers

    October 1949, Gütersloh, West Germany—The U.S. Air Forces Europe (USAFE) flight demonstration team, the Skyblazers, held its first public demonstration at a Royal Air Force base in occupied Germany. The team’s close-in aerobatics...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- September 2007

    One of Our Airliners Is Missing If somebody said a four- engine airliner had disappeared with everybody aboard, you’d be surprised. If they added that it had disappeared in the populous U.S. Midwest and was seen by numerous eyewitnesses...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Colt Also Offered Revolving Rifles

    Long guns upstaged by Colt revolvers. When Samuel Colt patented the first practical revolving pistol design early in 1836, he kindled the torch of legend for what became one of the most famous firearms in Western history. The Paterson Colt...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: The British Bulldog Revolver

    The British Bulldog Revolver: The Forgotten Gun That Really Won the West? by George Layman, Mowbray Publishing,Woonsocket, R.I., 2006, $34.99. As famous firearm collector Norm Flayderman reminds us in the introduction to George Layman’s...