Science & Engineering Archives | Page 2 of 24 | HistoryNet MENU

Science & Engineering

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Stick and Rudder

    Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying by Wolfgang Langewiesche In 1944 aviation writer and test pilot Wolfgang Langewiesche wrote Stick and Rudder, a primer about flying that was destined to become a classic of aviation...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Dead Pigeon: George Albree’s Fighting Squab

    The first contracted American fighter, the Pigeon Fraser was both ahead of and behind its time. When the United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917, the U.S. Army found it had a lot of catching up to do. That especially applied to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    One-Oh-Wonder, the F-101 Voodoo

    Conceived as a fighter escort for SAC nuclear bombers, then adapted to other roles, McDonnell’s 1,000-mph F-101 Voodoo made its mark operationally as a photoreconnaissance platform and fighter-interceptor. As Lieutenant Colonel James R....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    If At First You Don’t Succeed…

    Glenn H. Curtiss Museum’s flying boat undergoes modifications before a second flight attempt. Aviation’s early pioneers were no strangers to disappointment in their quest to conquer the air, and neither are aircraft restorers. A case...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Touching Space

    Touching Space: The Story of Project Manhigh by Gregory P. Kennedy, Schiffer Publishing Ltd., Atglen, Pa., 2007, $24.95. When we think of the nation’s space program, the first landing on the moon always comes to mind. But the road to the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Udvar-Hazy Center’s Seiran

    The sole surviving Aichi M6A1 floatplane bomber has been restored to fighting trim. The only remaining example of an Aichi M6A1 Seiran floatplane, part of Japan’s audacious plan to launch bombers against U.S. coastal cities and the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Ford’s Forgotten Aviation Legacy

    Henry Ford applied the principles of his progressive automobile production lines to manufacture the rugged, reliable Tri-Motor and later the Consolidated B-24. Henry Ford rarely gets mentioned these days in connection with the history of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fettered Eagles

    Great aircraft don’t always make it past the prototype stage, leaving their designers to lament what might have been. A good airplane that does not go into production is bad for almost everyone concerned—the designer, the company, the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: The God Machine

    The God Machine: From Boomerangs to Black Hawks, The Story of the Helicopter by James R. Chiles, Bantam Books, New York, 2007, $25. From its unusual title to the final page, this is a fascinating history of the development of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Unfettered Turkeys

    It’s easy enough to design a bad airplane, but it takes real gumption to put it into production despite all signs to the contrary. There are many reasons why less than first-rate aircraft are produced in quantity. The most dominant...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Anthony Fokker’s Fünfdecker

    With the V8, Anthony Fokker pursued a questionable concept into extreme territory. “Fokker is still the old Fokker,” wrote Lieutenant Rudolf Stark after seeing Fokker D.VII and E.V fighters on August 24, 1918, “for every new machine...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: X-15

    X-15: Extending the Frontiers of Flight by Dennis R. Jenkins, NASA, available for free download, 2007. It is usually unwise to call a book “definitive” because you never know what is waiting at the publishers, but I can say...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Road Not Taken

    Although many designers have tried to build a practical flying car, the idea never took off. Traffic is one of the banes of modern existence. What road- weary commuter has not dreamed of being able to simply fly over gridlocked traffic to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bonney Gull

    Leonard Bonney reverted to man’s oldest intuitive flight design. It used to be that there were weights and balances in relating history. Major events drew more attention, while lesser ones passed into oblivion. No more— YouTube has...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Wired for War

    Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century By P.W. Singer. 499 pp. Penguin Press, 2009 $29.95 Droids locked and loaded, ready to take over the world. As P.W. Singer describes in his latest tome on modern...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    High Tech vs. Low Tech

    The striking battle of wits and ingenuity that kept about half of the war’s choppers flying…and got about half of them shot down. “All of us who fought on the ground in Vietnam, we rode to war in the Huey, and that ‘whup, whup,...