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Science & Engineering

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Bonney Gull

    Leonard Bonney reverted to man’s oldest intuitive flight design. It used to be that there were weights and balances in relating history. Major events drew more attention, while lesser ones passed into oblivion. No more— YouTube has...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Wired for War

    Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century By P.W. Singer. 499 pp. Penguin Press, 2009 $29.95 Droids locked and loaded, ready to take over the world. As P.W. Singer describes in his latest tome on modern...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    High Tech vs. Low Tech

    The striking battle of wits and ingenuity that kept about half of the war’s choppers flying…and got about half of them shot down. “All of us who fought on the ground in Vietnam, we rode to war in the Huey, and that ‘whup, whup,...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Deadly Dozen

    Once these weapons hit the battlefield, warfare would never be the same. While humans have been killing each other since we first walked upright, most anthropologists believe the evolution of random violence into the organized group...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Sea Dart: Convair’s Incredible Wet Jet

    The XF2Y-1 Sea Dart was the only airplane to water-ski its way skyward. The advent of jet propulsion in the 1940s ushered in a whole new era of aircraft development. In the decade and a half following World War II, a remarkable variety of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Grumman Gulfstream I: The Bizjet Turns 50

    The first-ever business plane was a Curtiss JN-4 owned by the Heddon Co., a Michigan fishing lure manufacturer that in 1919 painted the Jenny to look like a big fish and flew it around to Midwestern tackle shops and fishing events. Despite...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Radical Wings & Wind Tunnels

    Radical Wings & Wind Tunnels: Advanced Concepts Tested at NASA Langley by Joseph R. Chambers and Mark A. Chambers, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2008, $34.95. This book covers a 91-year period of remarkable achievements by...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Aircraft Projects

    U.S. Experimental & Prototype Aircraft Projects: Fighters 1939-1945 by Bill Norton, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2008, $44.95. It’s no secret that World War II motivated nations to design, test and produce fighter aircraft...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    R-2800: Piston-Engine Perfection

    Pratt & Whitney’s 18-cylinder, twin-row radial didn’t break any new ground—it just got everything right. The Pratt & Whitney R-2800 was the most remarkable piston aircraft engine ever built. This compact 18-cylinder, twin-row...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Flying Boudoir

    The Sage Type 2 fighter’s elegant enclosed cockpit set it apart from other early two-seaters. When World War I began, few aircraft existed that had been specifically designed for military use. Of those, most were intended for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    From ‘Flying Bathtub’ to Space Shuttle

    What does a Pontiac convertible have to do with a space shuttle? In 1963 a souped-up Catalina ragtop was used to tow the M2-F1—the world’s first manned lifting body and arguably the shuttle’s forerunner—during initial tests of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Giving the Machine Guns Wings

    Air combat came of age during World War I with the invention of devices that allowed fighter pilots to “point and shoot”. On April 1, 1915, Roland Garros took off in a Morane-Saulnier L from an airfield in northern France, planning to...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Facing the Heat Barrier

    Facing the Heat Barrier: A History of Hypersonics by T.A. Heppenheimer, NASA History Series, Washington, D.C., 2008, $57.41. Tom Heppenheimer is well known for his books and articles on technical subjects, and Facing the Heat Barrier is a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Into the Air- Aviation of North America

    A handful of innovative pragmatists came together in 1907 to build flying machines, and in the process jump-started aviation in North America. At its outset, the Aerial Experiment Association might have seemed an unlikely venture. Launched...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Custer’s Channel Wing

    The inventor knew only frustration and failure, but his unusual wing design might yet succeed. Like many unique design concepts, the channel wing was the product of one man’s vision and persistence. Willard Custer, a great-grand nephew...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Spirit of Texas: Mission Accomplished

    Ross Perot Jr. was just 23 when he set out on a bold venture: to circumnavigate the world in a helicopter. He had only a year of flying under his belt at the time. Fortunately for him, his father, the well-known Texas business magnate and...