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  • Civil War Times Magazine

    War’s Flawed Prisoner Exchange Program

    They were places of wretchedness and death. Like poisonous weeds, they sprouted and multiplied, blighting a nation’s character. Their nourishment had been men, tens of thousands of condemned souls. They possessed damnable...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Very Important Prisoner

    Iwo Jima code clerk Taizo Sakai paid his captors back for sparing his life by revealing secrets about Japanese military activities elsewhere in the Pacific. Weeks after six young warriors planted Old Glory atop Iwo Jima’s Mount Suribachi...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letter from the Editor- March 2007

    The Prisoner Dilemma Major General Fred Haynes is a Marine’s Marine. During the battle for Iwo Jima, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal as a captain in the 28th Marines, the regiment that planted Old Glory on Mount Suribachi on...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- March 2007

    Rashomon Atop Mount Suribachi Sometimes history really is in the eye of the beholder. A new look at Leatherneck photographer Louis Lowery’s series of images from the first flag raising on Iwo Jima’s Mount Suribachi suggests that John...

  • World War II Magazine

    POW Hell in Switzerland

    One downed U.S. airman found unexpected torment when he was captured by the neutral Swiss. Hell’s Kitchen was in trouble. The B-24 Liberator of the Eighth Air Force’s 44th Bomb Group had run into some exploding flak over...

  • World War II Magazine

    An Unlikely Samaritan Saves the Day

    ‘My loaded pistol was in an enemy’s hands. And that was the good news’. Disaster almost always comes at you without warning. There is no time for preparation; you can’t brace yourself, or dodge. It just clobbers you when, where and...

  • World War II Magazine

    Darkness Over Kobe

    Two American airmen shot down during the firebombing of an ancient Japanese city became the unwitting victims of a cycle of cross-cultural vengeance. In the early morning hours of March 17, 1945, the wail of air raid sirens ripped the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: The First Marine Captured in Vietnam

    The First Marine Captured in Vietnam by Colonel David L. Price (ret.), U.S. Marine Corps. McFarland & Company, Jefferson, N.C., 2007, softcover $35. On December 31, 1964, then-Captain Donald Gilbert Cook suffered a leg wound while...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letters from Readers- December 2009

    Adams Yes, Arnett No You tainted an otherwise nice piece on the work of Eddie Adams in the August issue by including Peter Arnett’s comments. Arnett has an anti-America agenda. Your pages are filled with people and stories of honor, why...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Yankee Fugitives on the Lam

    Hunted across the wilds of the Carolinas after a daring escape, John Ennis thought of home and friends—and the Confederate patrols on his heels. When John W. Ennis enlisted in the Union Army on May 13, 1861, the Civil War was nearly a...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Search for the Captives of Elm Creek

    A fall Indian raid in frontier Texas was as dramatic as any in fiction, but no more gripping than the odyssey of the female captives and their searchers. Comanche and Kiowa raiders swept down on the Fitzpatrick ranch, a two-story house...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Forgotten Patriots

    Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of American Prisoners During the Revolutionary War Edwin G. Burrows, Basic Books, 384 pp., $27.50 After their victories at Brooklyn and Fort Washington in 1776, the British were “perplexed” about...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Andersonville to Tahiti

    Andersonville to Tahiti: The Story of Dorence Atwater by Thomas P. Lowry, BookSurge Publishing In July 1863, Dorence Atwater of the 2nd New York Cavalry was carrying messages to Colonel Judson Kirkpatrick’s headquarters when he was...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Lee’s Bold Plan for Point Lookout

    Lee’s Bold Plan for Point Lookout: The Rescue of Confederate Prisoners That Never Happened  by Jack E. Schairer, McFarland Publishers While Ulysses S. Grant’s Union forces began the Siege of Petersburg in June 1864, General Robert...

  • MHQ Magazine

    “That’s Ocay XX Time is on Our Side”

    Armed with that ironic epigram and their wits, American POWs in Vietnam endured with grace. ON MARCH 31, 1968, PRESIDENT LYNDON JOHNSON TOLD THE AMERICAN PEOPLE that he was suspending bombing of North Vietnam above the 21st Parallel. At...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Valor | Leo Thorsness

    Medal of Honor recipient, then prisoner of war. In spring 1967, Maj. Leo Keith Thorsness was a 35-year-old pilot in a two-seat F-105F Thunderchief fighter-bomber flying over North Vietnam to locate and destroy sites that launched...