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political history

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: The Fiery Trial

    The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery  by Eric Foner, W.W. Norton & Co. Looking for flaws in an Eric Foner book is like looking for flaws in the Hope Diamond; it’s a fool’s errand. Better to get comfortable and...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Ural on the URLs: Richmond’s Digital Scholarship

    dsl.richmond.edu/civilwar The website “Hidden Patters of the Civil War” raises the bar for scholarly historical sites. Hosted by the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, it was created by Robert K. Nelson, Scott Nesbit,...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: The Great Schism

    The Great Schism: The Dividing of Virginia During the American Civil War  by John A. Cowgill, CreateSpace In The Great Schism John Cowgill contends that “political rape” resulted in the “illegitimate” birth of the state of...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: America Aflame

    America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation by David Goldfield, Bloomsbury Press In his brilliant exegesis of the Civil War and its role in creating the modern American nation, David Goldfield boldly suggests “that the political...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: The Enemy Within

    The Enemy Within: Fears of Corruption in the Civil War North Michael Thomas Smith; University of Virginia Press Probing why Northerners seemed to be obsessed with corruption, Michael Smith concludes it was because “they had been educated...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Prime Minister and the Professor: Confidence Man

    Churchill’s friend and scientific adviser had the prime minister’s full faith— even when he shouldn’t have. ‘Love me, love my dog, and if you don’t love my dog you damn well can’t love me,” muttered an angry Winston...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Did FDR Doom Us to a Longer War?

    He sided with Churchill. He ignored his military advisers. As commander in chief of the United States during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt seized the controls of America’s war-making apparatus more firmly than any...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    To Soldier On in a Dying War

    Was it mutiny, or did common sense prevail at Fire Support Base? In early March 1971, a Harris Poll found a  majority of Americans believed the war in Vietnam to be “morally wrong.” Later that month an Americal Division armored...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The American Mayor of Saigon

    Was Archie Kuntze brought down by his own corruption, disgruntled MACV leadership, or was it just love? In the spring of 1938 the sons of Sheboygan,Wisconsin,dreamed far more practical dreams than had their parents. That year’s Sheboygan...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Museum Review: Ford’s Theatre’s Center

    Lincoln’s legacy inspires new center at Ford’s Theatre. At a glance, the 30-foot tower of Lincoln books in Ford’s Theatre’s Center for Education and Leadership in Washington, D.C., seems to include every title ever written about...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Soldiers and Statesmen

    The war officially ended in 1865, but would play a role in politics for the rest of the century as Republicans and Democrats alike urged voters to “vote as you shot”—with Union sympathizers siding with Republicans, and former...

  • Military History Magazine

    A Day of Blizzard and Blood

    The crown was at stake when, on a late winter day in 1461, two rival armies clashed in the bloodies battle on English soil. England’s Wars of the Roses were two struggles in one. The first was a feud between the houses of Lancaster...

  • Military History Magazine

    Europe’s Powder Keg

    When small Balkan nations took on Ottoman Turkey, they lit the fuze of world war. On Nov. 17, 1912, a 22-year-old American adventurer and would-be war correspondent named Henry Weston Farnsworth stood atop a low hill some 20 miles west of...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Road to Statehood, Southwest Style

    Once comprising a single territory, Arizona and New Mexico diverged in many ways long before each became a state 100 years ago. The path to statehood for New Mexico and Arizona began decades before the territories were admitted into the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Reviews: Red Cloud

    Red Cloud: Warrior-Statesman of the Lakota Sioux (1997, by RobertW. Larson)  This compelling biography of one of the most fascinating 19th-century Indian leaders is suited to both Wild West scholars and the general reading public. Red...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Red Cloud and the Bull Bear Shooting

    Oglala warrior Red Cloud rose to prominence after killing his rival, only to face the inherent perils of leadership in the win-or-die Lakota culture. “Politics,” to quote humorist Finley Peter Dunne from an 1895 newspaper column,...