Poetry Archives | HistoryNet MENU

Poetry

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Home Alone

      I packed your seabag today: six pairs of pants, shirts folded in their rigid squares, your socks balled up like tan grenades. I put my photo in as well, laid it there between the Kevlar vest and heap of clothes. Don’t weep, the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Poet Bandit of Arizona Territory

    Daring rustler and train robber ‘Red’ McNeil taunted territorial lawmen with his written words. In early 1889, Pete Jacoby of Winslow, Arizona Territory, found the long-sought hideout of outlaw W.R. “Red” McNeil in a narrow canyon...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | AWOL

    Eugene J. McCarthy was born in Watkins, Minnesota, in 1916. He became an economics professor after earning a graduate degree from the University of Minnesota, but during World War II he enlisted in the U.S. Army and served as a code...

  • World War II Magazine

    The GI Who Found Brutal Poetry in War

    World War II had barely started when the British press began to loudly ask why this war had not yet produced any soldier poets, as the last war had. “Where are the war poets?” became such a familiar cry that in early 1941 the poet and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | The Fallen Volunteer

    A collection of Sorley’s poetry, Marlborough and Other Poems, was published posthumously in 1916. His last poem was discovered in his kit bag after his death....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ‘Shoot, if you must, this old gray head’

    Even if it didn’t happen, Barbara Fritchie’s is a darn good tale. An old woman of 90 leans from the attic window of her Frederick, Md., home, holding a bullet-rent United States flag, and defies the massed forces of Stonewall Jackson...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | To Fight Another Day

    In 1913, after working as a correspondent for the Toronto Star during the Balkan Wars, Service—by then widely known as “The Bard of the Yukon”—moved to Paris. He was 41 when World War I broke out. Turned down for military service,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Of Soldiers and Generals

    Li Bai (701–762) is widely regarded as China’s greatest poet. In 756 he became unofficial poet laureate to Prince Li Lin, the 16th of Emperor Xuanzong’s 30 sons, who tried to seize power in an unsuccessful uprising against the Tang...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: Groucho Marx Lectures T.S. Eliot About King Lear

    One day in 1961, Groucho Marx received a letter from a fan requesting an  autographed picture. The request didn’t surprise him but the source did. The letter came from T.S. Eliot, one of the 20th century’s greatest poets, winner...

  • AMERICA'S CIVIL WAR MAGAZINE

    5 Questions: A Voyage In Verse With Kevin Gallagher

    Boston-area poet offers a compelling look at what tore our nation apart By day, Kevin Gallagher is professor of global development policy at Boston University. In his off-hours, he writes poems, and his latest work, Loom, explores the...

  • American History Magazine

    Letter from American History- June 2013

    Living History Do you remember when history first captured your imagination? A couple members of our staff, and no doubt countless other Americans, caught the history bug while listening to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poetry read aloud...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Loneliness of the Military Historian

    The Loneliness of the Military Historian By Margaret Atwood   Confess: it’s my profession that alarms you. This is why few people ask me to dinner, though Lord knows I don’t go out of my way to be scary. I wear dresses of sensible...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Unknown Soldier: A Poet at the Point

    Edgar Allan Poe’s turbulent stint in the United States Army. In biographical legend Edgar Allan Poe is remembered as a tortured aesthete, a solitary romantic genius, unrecognized and adrift in a cash-and-carry society. He is also...

  • MHQ Magazine

    And shells go crying over them—Voices of the Great War

    World War I spawned a generation of British soldier-poets whose verse took poetry in a raw new direction. Rupert Brooke led the way with an unadorned realism, but his famous poem “The Soldier” still voices the patriotic fervor of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Poets of Hell

    These few Englishmen described the brutal realities of the trenches, not as effete observers but as participants, fellow men-at-arms in the Great War. In April 1917 British army 2nd Lt. Wilfred Owen of the 5th Battalion, Manchester...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Letters from the Editor- Wild West October 2014

    Let me start by offering some questionable lyrics, with apologies to Harold Adamson, who wrote the real words to the memorable theme song of the 1950s TV Western The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp: I’ll tell you a story, a near true life...