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  • American History Magazine

    First Step Toward Destiny

    Edward S. Curtis found his calling when he photographed one remarkable face in 1899. The last Indian of Seattle lived in a shack down among the greased piers and coal bunkers of the new city, on what was then called West Street, her hovel...

  • American History Magazine

    Letter from American History- August 2013

    One way to measure the value of a thing is to simply let actors in a free market set it. What one person or entity gives to another in exchange for an item is a rational way to assess that item’s value. When a 20-volume set of Edward...

  • American History Magazine

    Interview: Roger Daniels, immigration historian

    Roger Daniels, a professor emeritus of history at the University of Cincinnati, has witnessed more than a few attempts by Congress and the president to reform immigration policy. He has written a half-dozen books on the topic, including...

  • American History Magazine

    Ernest Hemingway Toasts J.D. Salinger

    Ernest Hemingway was roaring drunk when he suffered his war wound. It was May 25, 1944, and America’s most famous novelist was in London, preparing to cover the invasion of France for Collier’s magazine and cheating on his third wife,...

  • American History Magazine

    The First Guide Dog

    In 1914, at the age of 6, Morris Frank was blinded in his right eye in a horse-riding accident. Ten years later, a boxing match cost him the sight in his left eye. Frustrated at having to rely on others to get around his hometown of...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: Copperhead

    Copperhead  Swordspoint Productions, Directed by Ron Maxwell, In select theaters nationwide The final episode in Ron Maxwell’s Civil War trilogy (Gettysburg, Gods and Generals) takes us to upstate New York in spring 1862, when the...

  • American History Magazine

    Superman at 75

    The Man of Steel reaches a milestone—and shows no sign of slowing down. We live in an era when politicians seldom stay in our good graces for more than a few months, and sports figures are lucky if they hold their star status more than a...

  • American History Magazine

    Rebellion, Love and Revolution

    Young and vivacious, Lucy Knox surrendered privilege and comfort to be with her lover, Henry, on the long journey to revolution and victory. In August 1773, as a local militia drilled on Boston Common, 17-year-old Lucy Flucker observed a...

  • American History Magazine

    Abraham Lincoln Greets General and Mrs. Tom Thumb

    It was America’s first full-blown celebrity wedding, choreographed, publicized and staged by P.T. Barnum, the genius of hype, and it came in the depths of the Civil War, when Americans were eager for a moment of joyous distraction. The...

  • American History Magazine

    We’ve Been Here Before: Domestic Terrorism- The Killers Next Door

    Tamerlan and Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the Boston Marathon bombers, murdered four people and injured 280 in the April blast they set off near Copley Square and in shootings afterward. Tamerlan, the elder brother, was also killed. Dzhokar said...

  • World War II Magazine

    Miracle Men of Midway

    The American victory at Midway had more to do with bold leaders than lucky breaks...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    War’s Song

    How Barry Sadler’s “The Ballad of the Green Berets” became the No. 1 single of 1966. A little more than 50 years ago, on May 7, 1967, a 26-year-old Green Beret staff sergeant let his term of enlistment expire and took his honorable...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: War of the Worlds-American Experience

    War of the Worlds  American Experience, PBS, 60 minutes, airs in October (2013) On October 30, 1938, Orson Welles and his heralded Mercury Theater unwittingly unloosed one of the best-known Halloween tricks of all time. Millions of...

  • American History Magazine

    The Pawpaw Paradox

    A forgotten American treasure makes a comeback. The small maroon bloom is morbidly elegant, not much bigger than a thimble, with an aroma said to faintly resemble rotting flesh. Just about everyone has heard of the pawpaw— towns named...

  • American History Magazine

    Failed Gambit

    Conservative Senator Nelson Aldrich joined progressive President William H. Taft in supporting a constitutional amendment on federal income taxes because he knew it wouldn’t pass. But Aldrich got it all wrong. THIS YEAR, to the chagrin...

  • American History Magazine

    The Army Vs. The Mob

    When railroad workers ignited a widespread, violent strike in 1877, President Rutherford B. Hayes deployed U.S. troops to end the upheaval—and in doing so strengthened the power of the executive branch. Rutherford B. Hayes was a man...