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  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Letter from the Editor- June 2012

    Vol.25 No.1 and Other Milestones This issue of Vietnam is the first of our 25th year of publication. In 1988, retired Army colonel and founding editor Harry G. Summers Jr. wrote in the premier issue: “Perplexing and baffling the Vietnam...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- June 2012

    Tapes Give New Voice to JFK’s Vietnam Doubt The last 45 hours of more than 248 hours of declassified conversations of President John F. Kennedy, taped in the White House shortly before his death, reveal a president worried about where...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Travels Against Charlie

    American literary legend John Steinbeck’s last work was a risky assignment as a war correspondent in Vietnam. Nearly three decades after John Steinbeck wrote his 1939 masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath, the 64-year-old Nobel...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Esper and Ut Ride Again

    Long after the war, the AP’s George Esper and Pulitzer Prize–winning photographer Nick Ut turned up to get another scoop in Vietnam. Vietnam’s June 2012 issue, with its remembrance of George Esper and story behind Nick Ut’s...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Horst Faas: An Appreciation

    The death on May 10 of legendary Associated Press photographer and editor Horst Faas prompted hundreds of comments and recollections from his colleagues and friends with a common theme, calling Faas a generous man of considerable humor and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    When Psywar Went So Wrong

    A long-running psychological warfare battle over an alleged Viet Cong martyr grew to resemble MAD magazine’s “Spy vs. Spy” The cultivation of heroes can be critical in a society at war. In early 1967 Barry Zorthian, the head of the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Boys of ’67: Vietnam’s Band of Brothers

    The 160 men of Charlie Company trained together for nearly a year before combat in Vietnam. Only 30 returned unscathed. In May 1966 the United States was ramping up its combat forces by conscripting tens of thousands of young men, many...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Vietnam News -December 2012

    Newly Discovered Vietnam Monument Baffles Pennsylvania Community A monument dedicated on Nov. 11, 1966,“to the men of Delaware County for their valiant service in Vietnam” was recently discovered beneath brush in an old bank parking...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Book Review: Confederate Outlaw

    Confederate Outlaw: Champ Ferguson and the Civil War in Appalachia Brian D. McKnight; LSU Press, 2011, $34.95 Champ Ferguson, part-time soldier and full-time killer, was a very bad man and possibly a paranoid sociopath. That’s clear from...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Great Train Chase of 1862

    Two trains, one track, and 87 miles of hot Georgia pursuit. Union Maj. Gen. Ormsby “Old Stars” Mitchel was, befitting the nickname, an astronomer at the Dudley Observatory in Albany, N.Y., when the war broke out and he resigned his...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Legends: Sing a song of war

    Since the dawn of time, men have waged war, and always there was the music. Horns and drums, lyres and pipes inspired and preceded men into battle; bards celebrated victory, lamented defeat. We know this from Homer, from the Celtic and...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Weakest Link

    In the winter of 1861, Allan Pinkerton’s best agent—Timothy Webster—provided the famous detective with information that helped thwart a plot to assassinate President-elect Abraham Lincoln in Baltimore. A year later, Webster had...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Letters from Readers March 2012

    Against all odds I read with dismay “The Fightin’ Irish,” by Thomas Craughwell (November 2011). While the Irish brigades lost almost half their number in the “Battle” of Fredericksburg, the 13,000 Union casualties at the hands of...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Inventing Military Dog Tags

    Shortly after the surrender at Appomattox, Union Maj. Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and his men stopped to camp near Hanover Court House in Virginia. Just around midnight Chamberlain was roused from his sleep as his horse stirred at its...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Cease Fire: Don’t judge a book by its author’s popularity

    Any recent glance at the non-fiction best-seller list might convince the casual reader that presidential history New York Times is thriving. No fewer than three books about American presidents have ranked at or near the top of the chart....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Just how much can a girl get away with?

    When the Civil War began, no one—neither politicians nor military men—expected to have to contend with women. War, like the politics that made it, was men’s work; women were innocents to be protected. This idea was as old as...