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  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letters from Readers- March 2007

    Artillery and Gliders As a recent subscriber to Aviation History, I found two articles in the July 2006 issue of great interest. Regarding Kelly Bell’s feature “Mustang Wrangler George Preddy,” I am quite sure the unit that shot him...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: I’ll Fly Away

    I’ll Fly Away: A World War II Pilot’s Lifetime of Adventures From Biplanes to Jumbo Jets by Jack Race with William F. Hallstead, University of Scranton Press, Scranton, Pa., 2006, $20 softcover. Jack Race soloed in an Aeronca C-3 at...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Glory & Appendicitis

    Endurance fliers Louise Thaden and Frances Marsalis triumphed over exhaustion—and media hype—in 1932. In July 1932, Louise McPhetridge Thaden received a call from Charles S. “Casey” Jones, manager of Curtiss Airport at Valley...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Letters from Readers- May 2007

    More Musical Musings We received a number of letters from readers who were intrigued by Jack Lambert’s “Reflections From the Cockpit,” the collection of aviator songs and verse that appeared in the January 2007 issue. For many it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Pou du Ciel

    History’s first homebuilt entrepreneur named his aircraft after an insect. By the mid-1920s aviation was no longer solely the province of the professional. The man (and woman) on the street desperately wanted to get in on it....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Ace in a Day

    Major Archie G. Donahue shot down five aircraft on a single mission—twice. Major Archie Donahue’s reputation preceded him when he began training a new generation of U.S. Marine pilots to operate the Vought F4U-1D Corsair from aircraft...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Larry Walters (“Lawnchair Larry”)

    July 2, 1982, San Pedro, Calif.— Larry Walters, a 33-year-old truck driver, lofted into the air in perhaps the most precarious way possible—in a Sears lawn chair. Lift was provided by 42 helium-filled weather balloons. Walters reached...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Review: Cheyenne

    Cheyenne originally on TV 1955-63, DVD 2006 (Warner Home Video), $39.98, 5 discs, 780 minutes. This series debuted on September 20, 1955, 10 days after the debut of Gunsmoke, and it wasn’t long before imaginative kids around the nation...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: John Sutter

    John Sutter: A Life on the North American Frontier by Albert L. Hurtado, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2006, $34.95. The man himself may not be as well-known as his fort and mill, but a modern biography of the influential Westerner...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: William Harding Carter and the American Army

    William Harding Carter and the American Army: A Soldier’s Story by Ronald G. Machoian, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2006, $34.95. William Harding Carter saw action, and change, during a military career that began during the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Empire Mine Turned Grass Valley Golden

    Going below for California gold. Bearded prospectors, elbow to elbow, scratch the sands of creek beds in search of nuggets and fine gold. That is the image most likely to come to mind when the California Gold Rush is mentioned today. But...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Comanche Attack on Early Texas Frontier

    Mission built for Apaches targeted. Long before they terrorized American settlers in Texas, Comanches made life miserable there not only for the Spanish colonials but also for the Plains Apaches. The destruction of a Spanish mission near...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The West Was Tough, But He Took the Toll

    Wootton was a shrewd entrepreneur. Even Dick Wootton’s two hunting dogs didn’t want any part of the rabid wolf that had fearlessly entered the trapper’s camp. After Wootton stood up and encouraged the dogs, they went for the wolf,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Virginian Buck Morton in Lincoln County War

    His letter foreshadowed his sad fate. Best known for heading a subposse that killed English-born rancher John Henry Tunstall and, in turn, being gunned down by an opposing “posse” that included Billy the Kid, William S. “Buck”...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Letter from the Editor- February 2007

    Welcome to Weider’s  Wonderful Wild West Never fear, dear reader, the new Wild West is still wild. “And now more wonderful than ever!” exclaimed the old editor, who was not paid (not much anyway) for his ad-lib endorsement....

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Oregon Boot Was Not Made for Walking

    A prison warden invented it. Oregon built a territorial prison at Portland in 1854, and it was adequate for almost a decade. Following statehood and an unpredicted population increase, the original facility became overcrowded, and convict...