News Archives | Page 2 of 16 | HistoryNet MENU

News

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- April 2008

    Sainthood for Vietnam War chaplain? Since his death on the battlefield on Sept. 4, 1967, many Marines who knew Rev. Vincent Capodanno have called their chaplain a saint and have offered testimonies to his bravery, compassion and genuine...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A Minor Rebellion

    The scene is a familiar one. A column of American GIs, hunched over from the weight of 80 pound rucksacks, warily works its way through a miasma of dense green foliage, rifles at the ready. Their frightened eyes peer from masks of dust and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- June 2008

    Vietnam: From red to green Even after the Vietnam War ended, the battle against communism continued on. Now, more than 35 years after the end of the war, capitalism appears in many ways to have won over Vietnam. To Americans the country...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- August 2008

    Memorial Wall records now available via the Web The National Archives and Records Administration and Footnote.com have together launched a virtual replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall, making historical records of...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- October 2008

    A most unlikely McCain supporter Although Tran Trong Duyet hasn’t seen Senator John McCain for nearly 35 years, he says he’d vote for him if he could. The 75-year-old met McCain during the former Navy pilot’s incarceration in Hanoi...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam News- December 2008

    Agent Orange Linked to Prostate Cancer Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange have a significantly greater risk of prostate cancer, especially the most aggressive form of the disease, according to a recently released study. The study of...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War- Open Fire January 2008

    Restoration Starts on Mosby Rendezvous Church One of the most significant buildings related to Confederate John Singleton Mosby’s storied career is soon launching an important restoration. During the Civil War, Mount Zion Old School...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War- Open Fire March 2008

    Upper Midwest Civil War Museum Coming in June In June, a new Civil War museum will open, and it won’t be located in Virginia or Pennsylvania, or near a battlefield, or anywhere along the Eastern seaboard. Instead, the museum will sit...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War- Open Fire May 2008

    First-day site at Chancellorsville opens to public In the opening hours of the May 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville, it was not yet clear that Robert E. Lee was about to win one of his greatest victories— but at the greatest cost, with...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Open Fire- July 2008

    1862 Maryland headquarters in dire straits An 1820s house near Burkittsville, Md., that offered shelter to Union troops during the war now sits exposed to the elements and in danger of collapse. The yellow brick, Federal-style house has...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    America’s Civil War Open Fire- September 2008

    Grave robbers desecrate and loot Fort Craig, N.M., cemetery Last year, federal archaeologists exhumed 67 bodies from Fort Craig, a Civil War-era fort in New Mexico, after a looting investigation led them to a house where remains of a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- January 2008

    Bear in the Air Not since the Fairey Swordfish “Stringbag” biplane whacked the Italians at Taranto and crippled Bismarck has an airplane as archaic as the Russian Tupolev Tu-95 Bear strategic bomber threatened the Western powers. Yes,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- March 2008

    Rosie the Riveters Take Flight Yes, there actually was a Rosie the Riveter, one of the famous World War II women war workers. Rose Monroe, a young Kentuckian, went to work at Ford’s famous Willow Run bomber factory in Ypsilanti,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- May 2008

    The Maid of Harlech It’s unusual that somebody comes across the wreck of a World War II aircraft who has the forbearance to not only leave the wreckage undisturbed but to maintain secrecy about its location, and then to search out a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- July 2008

    The Oldest Herk The U.S. Marines traditionally get the short end of the stick when it comes to aircraft. Their planes are often old and outmoded, or variants that the Navy isn’t quite sure what to do with. So it should come as no...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- September 2008

    The Rocket Racing League Do not bet against entrepreneur Peter Diamandis. Crazy as his ideas might superficially seem, he makes them work. Diamandis’ X-Prize Foundation led to the first successful private-venture spacecraft, Burt...