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Naval History

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: The USS Carondelet

    The USS Carondelet: A Civil War Ironclad in Western Waters by Myron J. Smith Jr., McFarland The seven “City” or Cairo-class ironclad gunboats designed by James B. Eads, Commander John Rodgers and John Lenthall, and modified by Eads and...

  • World War II Magazine

    Teddy Suhren’s Last Patrol

    Long-lost photographs document the final mission of a U-boat rebel. At 9:30 p.m. on July 9, 1942, the German submarine U-564 slipped out of the harbor at Brest, on the northwest coast of France. It was based there in a cavernous bunker...

  • World War II Magazine

    Strange Fortune

    An American sub at the Battle of Midway finds that luck can be a powerful weapon. By the time the USS Tambor departed from Pearl Harbor on May 21, 1942, to battle the Japanese, Robert R. Hunt, torpedo- man second class, had already...

  • World War II Magazine

    What was the Navy Doing in China?

    Spying, weather reporting, training Chinese fighters— and battling foes within. “What the hell is the navy doing here?” That’s how U.S. Navy radioman Richard Rutan was greeted when he stepped down from a C-47 plane in central China...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Underwater Terror

    The plucky Bushnell brothers invented the military submarine, frightened the mighty British fleet, and gave George Washington a bit of hope. LEONARDO da Vinci, a great dabbler in military machines, once sketched designs for a crude subma-...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Navy’s big, green monster

    The first U.S. submarine targeted wretched Rebel ironclads. In 1869, Jules Verne wrote Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, a novel about circumnavigating the  globe underwater, in which he introduced readers to Captain Nemo’s...

  • Military History Magazine

    Arsenal of Venice: World’s First Weapons Factory

    Venice’s maritime power arose from a shipyard that with mass-production techniques, superb organization and skilled workers could launch two new ships a day. In 1202, at the outset of the Fourth Crusade, the city-state of Venice accepted...

  • Military History Magazine

    Tripoli Pirates Foiled

    When corsairs demanded gold from America in return for peace at sea, Thomas Jefferson sent warships instead...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Hell in the Harbor

    Accurate Rebel ‘shot and shell’ terrified Fort Sumter’s garrison. Charleston Harbor, April 1861: Three hours before dawn, a single shell announced the war’s beginning. Suddenly something flashed and boomed ashore. In Fort Sumter...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- February 2011

    Merciful Lie? Convicted War Criminal May Have Saved Allied Lives It was a meeting that may well have changed the course of the war— although not in the way historians have long assumed. Victory seemed to be slipping away from the Germans...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Model Review: Yukikaze

    Japan’s Yukikaze Destroyer The commissioned in 1940, saw action in Yukikaze, a Kagero-class destroyer most of the big battles in the Pacific War. In December 1941, it supported Japanese landings at Luzon. The ship screened troop landings...

  • World War II Magazine

    Red Ramage’s Wild Ride

    An American sub skipper chases an elusive Japanese convoy—and finds unparalleled glory. The commanding officer was hopping back and forth between the lookouts on the radar screen in the conning tower, and the plot table in the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Clean Sweep: A Mine Sweeper’s Journey

    After the war ended, the war against underwater mines went on. One sailor’s story. On paper, in August 1945, and nearly every serviceman wanted to go home. For me and others serving on minesweepers, the war was over the end seemed...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Sea Change- Reinvention of the U.S. Navy

    How the U.S. Navy reinvented itself— and its sailors—during a century of radical change in technology and warfare. Navies, at first sight, appear to be highly traditional, even reactionary, organizations. The 21st-century U.S. Navy...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Catch Me If You Can

    How a crafty German admiral led the Royal Navy on a wild chase across the Mediterranean and changed the balance of power in the First World War. Almost a year into World War I, American diplomat Lewis Einstein met Wilhelm Souchon, a rear...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Fireball at Zonchio

    A ferocious battle with the Turks marked the end of Venice’s sea power. On October 31, 1498, a Venetian merchant, Andrea Gritti, wrote home from the Ottoman capital of Constantinople: “I can’t tell you more about business and...