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Ambush and Siege at Paint Rock

In March 1846, Jack Hays and a company of Texas Rangers ambushed a large raiding party on sacred Comanche ground, but the outnumbered Texians soon found themselves under siege.
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We Shall Remain – Interview with Ric Burns and Chris Eyre

Directors Ric Burns and Chris Eyre talk in an exclusive interview about the making of We Shall Remain and the determination to tell the story of Native Americans in a way it has never been told before, neither demonizing nor deifying their subject.
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Letter from American History – June 2009

Despite more than two centuries of broken treaties and displacement by white settlers, Native American tribes have not only survived but they retain the legal status of sovereign nations accorded to them by the nation's founders. These issues are explored in an article by Paul VanDevelder.
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What Do We Owe the Indians?

Paul VanDevelder writes about the troubled history of the 562 Native American nations, their 371 treaties with the United States, and the emerging importance of natural resources found on Native American lands.
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Letter from Wild West – June 2009

Monument Valley, Arizona, has long stood a symbol of the American West, from its early history as a home to the Anasazi and Navajos through pioneer days to its modern-day incarnation as iconic Western film backdrop.
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Letter from Wild West – April 2009

Following the 1864 Elm Creek Raid, Britt Johnson went in search of his family, taken captive by Kiowa and Comanche Raiders. His story would later inspire the book and movie The Searchers.
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Victorio’s War

For Apache chief Victorio, the decision to make war on the United States was a matter of rights and spirituality. Known as the "greatest Indian general" ever, he terrorized settlers and the army, surpassing Geronimo's feats and ferocity.
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Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle

Although usually portrayed as a man of peace, Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle may have been an ineffective leader at best.

By Gregory Michno