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Military Technology

  • World War II Magazine

    A Homemade Aussie Submachine Gun

    The unconventional Owen stood up well to the hard conditions of jungle fighting. Army ordnance officers at the Victoria Barracks in Sydney politely showed 24-year-old inventor Evelyn Owen the door in July 1939 when he came calling with the...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Young Physicist Who Blunted the Blitz

    Like many a scientist on the eve of World War II, R. V. Jones wondered if he had made a terrible blunder by offering his brains rather than his brawn to his country. For every Ph.D. lucky enough to be assigned a truly war winning...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man on the Trail of the Nazi A-bomb

    The first five Allied vehicles to enter Paris on its day of liberation from Nazi occupation on August 25, 1944, were tanks of the Free French forces. The sixth was an American jeep. Dodging sniper fire, it cut through back streets and...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Gritty City That Armed America

    Decades ago, when I sailed my small sloop from Richmond, California, into San Francisco Bay, I passed ghostly artifacts of America’s monumental World War II industrial effort. Disused dry docks, rusting cranes, and abandoned buildings...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Jet Race and the Second World War

    The Jet Race and the Second World War By Sterling Michael Pavelec. 248 pp. Praeger Security International, 2007. $49.95. The first true jet vs. jet air war took place over Korea, but jet-propelled aircraft debuted during World War II. The...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Town that Gave Birth to the Bomb

    Los Alamos is misleading. Most New Mexico towns, with their quaint adobe walls, emanate a sense of the past. But Los Alamos on first inspection lacks any feeling of real history. You drive up through some magnificent country into this town...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Ultimate Weapon

    Precision-guided munitions have changed the modern battlefield, and in the process created a new American way of war. On March 30, 1972, as American troop strength in Vietnam fell to a seven-year low—well below the hundred-thousand...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Developing the Fire Team

    Various nations explored ways to deploy automatic rifles before the cosmopolitan fire team found a permanent home in the U.S. Marine Corps. For more than half a century, the rifle squads of the U.S. Marine Corps have been organized with a...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Wiring Vietnam

    Wiring Vietnam: The Electronic Wall by Anthony J. Tambini. Scarecrow Press, Lanham, Md., 2007, softcover $60.00. During the Vietnam War, the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) established supply networks in Cambodia and Laos to support its forces...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam’s Wild Weasels

    A band of daring fliers team up in a classified program to take out the radars guiding their biggest threat—Soviet SA-2 Guideline missiles. Like many American boys who had grown up during World War II, Stan Goldstein was fascinated with...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The More Things Change….

    The learning curve for U.S. forces running convoy operations in Vietnam was steep. A cunning enemy and restrictive terrain required escort units to possess well-understood and rehearsed battle drills, to have mobile and lethal convoy...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: Enemy Rockets

    The VC and the NVA used their improvised rocket artillery with deadly effect. North Vietnamese Army weaponry underwent a dramatic shift during the time I commanded the Combined Materiel Exploitation Center (CMEC), between August 1965 and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The 60th Land Clearing Company ‘Jungle Eaters’

    Choking dust, clouds of stinging insects, biting monkeys, trees and enemy rockets crashing from above, tunnels collapsing under foot— in temperatures reaching 130 degrees—were all in a day’s work for the 60th Land Clearing Company,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The LVTP-5 amtrac pulled its weight in Vietnam

    On December 11, 1967, two Marine provisional rifle platoons moved in on a North Vietnamese Army (NVA) position near the mouth of the Cua Viet River. An attached company of Marine infantry had spotted an NVA platoon the day before. Part of...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: Technology and the American Way of War Since...

    Technology and the American Way of War Since 1945 by Thomas G. Mahnken, Columbia University Press, New York, 2008, $29.50. Thomas Mahnken has achieved the near impossible. He has taken a topic that has consumed several forests worth of...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Model 1842 Pistol Was Lost to Glory

    It was overshadowed by Colt revolvers The powerful .44- caliber cap-and-ball Walker Colt and its lighter-framed, shorter-barreled derivative, the Model 1848 Colt Dragoon revolver, were hits on the Western frontier after the Mexican War....